Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
News Content Gallery About Donate Discord Contact
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

Indie Citizen Sleeper - Narrative RPG set on a space station by the developer of In Other Waters

Grauken

Blobbers forever
Patron
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
8,971
Transhumanism and cyberpunk have often been at odds with each other. Transhumanism is about how technology will uplift mankind. Cyberpunk is about how it will fail to do so and will lend itself to new dystopias.

I see transhumanism more as an offshoot that grew out of cyberpunk. When CP came onto the stage man-machine interfaces and virtual realities were all the rage, but most cyberpunk was just about slightly modifications or upgrades of the human template, where transhumanism went kind of beyond it with more extreme changes and how that would impact societies. Hence lots of cyberpunk takes place in a still recognizable near-earth future, where lots of transhumanism takes place in far future space operas with the whole galaxy as the stage.
 

Absinthe

Arcane
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
3,805
Well they draw heavily from the same wellspring and both concepts can factor into each other, but the overall perspective tends to be different. A lot of transhumanists tend not to like cyberpunk much, and consider it edgy shit for surly teenagers, but transhumanism also often comes off as unwilling to accept the kinds of problems that cyberpunk tends to paint into stark relief. Not to mention a lot of cyberpunk will question the loss of humanity in surrendering your thinking to machines while transhumanism celebrates the machine consciousness as the evolution of the human, opening up amazing new possibilities.
 

Grauken

Blobbers forever
Patron
Joined
Mar 22, 2013
Messages
8,971
A lot of transhumanists tend not to like cyberpunk much

While I mostly agree with your other sentiments, here we have to make a distinction between writers and readers/those that call themself transhumanists or one of its offshoots and for whom it has become almost like a belief system. Writers like Stross, Watts, and some others for example have written transhumanist science fiction that is every bit as dystopic as the best cyberpunk and they usually regard the readers who would love nothing more than life in a transhumanist future very critically. That said, in general, transhumanism comes off as more upbeat or less bleak than cyberpunk. I don't think I've read any cyberpunk that's not a dystopia at the same time
 

Absinthe

Arcane
Joined
Jan 6, 2012
Messages
3,805
Fair enough, and there's definitely room for variation, but that sort of perspective conflict I described does exist. Also, there are cyberpunk stories about finding your own happiness amidst a dystopian world but the dystopian elements are pretty much part of the genre.
 

fantadomat

Arcane
Edgy Vatnik Wumao
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
33,694
Location
Bulgaria
Infinitron can you remove that kwan retard from this thread,would prefer to talk about the game and not read pages of his idiotic retardation that have nothing to do with the game
 

fantadomat

Arcane
Edgy Vatnik Wumao
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
33,694
Location
Bulgaria
That said i finished the game. It is not a bad storyfag game with some sjws shit in it. The worst part is that it seems like the main quest is kind off bugged or maybe unfinished. Because i finished all the side quests and decided to stay on the station,but the game just ends up still going on but with nothing to do in it. Also it is pretty small,i finished it around 5-6 hours.
 

tripedal

Savant
Joined
Feb 22, 2015
Messages
400
Location
Ultima Thule
Played it. Not bad, I like the vibe and aesthetics. Comparisons to DE are pretty misguided, CS doesn't have either the humanity or the sophistication (technical and political) of DE. Kinda fizzles out toward the end.
 

Ivan

Arcane
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Messages
6,462
so far so good

will be back tomorrow for another session:balance:
 

Dodo1610

Magister
Joined
May 3, 2018
Messages
1,978
Location
Germany
I finished it yesterday and though I really liked the art and writing the soundtrack is really elevating the whole experience. Sadly the resource management becomes trivial after a few hours. Despite it's issues this was one of the rare examples where I wish that there was more content instead of being glad that it over. So therefore it's already one of my favourite games of the year.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2015
Messages
1,664
Location
DFW, Texas
That said i finished the game. It is not a bad storyfag game with some sjws shit in it. The worst part is that it seems like the main quest is kind off bugged or maybe unfinished. Because i finished all the side quests and decided to stay on the station,but the game just ends up still going on but with nothing to do in it. Also it is pretty small,i finished it around 5-6 hours.
How much SJW shit? Are we talking "I've got to check these boxes to placate the corporate overlords"-level or, "we need a final solution for the straight, white male question"-level SJW?
 

fantadomat

Arcane
Edgy Vatnik Wumao
Joined
Jun 2, 2017
Messages
33,694
Location
Bulgaria
That said i finished the game. It is not a bad storyfag game with some sjws shit in it. The worst part is that it seems like the main quest is kind off bugged or maybe unfinished. Because i finished all the side quests and decided to stay on the station,but the game just ends up still going on but with nothing to do in it. Also it is pretty small,i finished it around 5-6 hours.
How much SJW shit? Are we talking "I've got to check these boxes to placate the corporate overlords"-level or, "we need a final solution for the straight, white male question"-level SJW?
They are a bit fluent,like being able to run away with an ex soldier and his adopted kid,which is pretty strange since you play as some kind of robot thingy that doesn't have clear sex. But generally it is pretty ok.
 

ERYFKRAD

Barbarian
Patron
Joined
Sep 25, 2012
Messages
23,917
Strap Yourselves In Serpent in the Staglands Shadorwun: Hong Kong Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker
That said i finished the game. It is not a bad storyfag game with some sjws shit in it. The worst part is that it seems like the main quest is kind off bugged or maybe unfinished. Because i finished all the side quests and decided to stay on the station,but the game just ends up still going on but with nothing to do in it. Also it is pretty small,i finished it around 5-6 hours.
How much SJW shit? Are we talking "I've got to check these boxes to placate the corporate overlords"-level or, "we need a final solution for the straight, white male question"-level SJW?
They are a bit fluent,like being able to run away with an ex soldier and his adopted kid,which is pretty strange since you play as some kind of robot thingy that doesn't have clear sex. But generally it is pretty ok.
Is there combat?
 

Ivan

Arcane
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Messages
6,462
gotta say I'm quite enjoying this "day-in-the-life" gameloop. I like how NPCs are gated by the menial jobs you can assign your time to. music has been a wonderful companion as well. having a much better time after I tweaked the scroll speed as well.
 

Morgoth

Arcane
Patron
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Messages
31,033
Location
Apple Strudel Food Inspection GmbH
https://www.gameinformer.com/review/citizen-sleeper/a-sleeper-hit

Citizen Sleeper Review
A Sleeper Hit
by Wesley LeBlanc on May 23, 2022 at 10:53 AM

Reviewed on Xbox Series X/S
Also on Switch, PC
Publisher Fellow Traveller
Developer Jump Over The Age
Release May 5, 2022
Rating Teen

When I booted up Citizen Sleeper for the first time, it immediately enthralled me with its premise. Its dystopian transhumanist pitch – surviving as a digitized consciousness of a human body implanted into a robot designed to work for a mega-corporation – is refreshing in the cyberpunk genre of games. Its slick, clean, and unique art style, coupled with its score, a Tycho-esque take on sci-fi beats, told me I was in for a good time, assuming the gameplay would click. And at first, I wasn't sure if it was going to because its early moments are overwhelming, with a barrage of new mechanics and systems defining the first hour. I was rewarded for sticking with it because all aspects of Citizen Sleeper, including its gameplay, had me hooked after that introduction. Seven hours later, I rolled credits on one of my favorite gaming experiences of 2022.


You awake as a Sleeper, a robot powered by a consciousness that belongs to somebody else. In this instance, it belongs to someone that owes mega-corp Essen-Arp money, and to repay that debt, their mind has been digitized and put inside a machine explicitly designed to work for them; that's the typical life of a Sleeper. You, however, have escaped, and the narrative of Citizen Sleeper begins there, unfolding as you learn to survive and thrive.

The story of Citizen Sleeper is simple: Evade Essen-Arp's bounty hunters who want to reclaim you while securing a future for yourself. Erlin's Eye, a space station that acted as my refuge before becoming my new home, is the backdrop of all this. I love how I became intimately familiar with the quasi-metropolis over time. Citizen Sleeper lovingly forced me to understand this space station as both a map for my objectives and a hub for deepening my relationships with its residents. To achieve this, I needed to complete various objectives aboard Erlin's Eye ranging from paying off one of these bounty hunters to live another day to affording medicine I desperately needed to heal my constantly degrading body.


How that, and nearly every objective, plays out is determined by a unique dice mechanic and its connection to your physical condition. Citizen Sleeper's primary gameplay loop is simple on paper: You're given up to six pre-rolled dice each cycle. The healthier you are, the more dice you get. A six-dice roll carries a higher chance of getting a positive outcome when attempting to do something like earn money or fix a ship. A lower dice count, like a two, comes with an increased likelihood of a negative outcome, which can be pretty detrimental in some cases.

I enjoyed how often this mechanic put me in the hot seat. Do I use a six-dice roll to guarantee a positive outcome for an objective I really need to complete, or do I use it on a job that will net me a lot of money because I need it to afford medicine to replenish my condition? And on that same note, should I use my one die on a safer task or risk it on something that could greatly reward me right now? These decisions colored my entire Citizen Sleeper experience. Some were so stressful, especially those that felt like life or death, that I needed to pause and put the controller down for a few minutes. The way the game's musical score amps up the stress levels in these situations was also devilishly delightful.

Citizen Sleeper uses these moments to take me through every throe of capitalism, which is the true antagonist in developer Jump Over The Age's story. When I first arrived, I struggled to make it through one cycle without feeling completely overwhelmed and unseen. I couldn't make money, so I was unable to buy food, which was necessary to keep my energy up. As a result, my health quickly worsened, and because of this struggle, I couldn't afford medicine. This built on itself until I hit rock bottom, which locked me out of one of my Sleeper's core abilities displayed on a sleek skills screen. I could only unlock it with an upgrade point, which is earned after completing main objectives. But, to accomplish that, I needed some great dice or at least multiple dice. With my condition in the dumps, getting either felt impossible.

cs5.jpg


Over time, I overcame these challenges. Little by little, I earned enough money that I could spend less time obtaining medicine and food and more on actually completing objectives on the horizon. By the end of Citizen Sleeper, I stopped thinking about money, and I was instead focused solely on helping the NPCs around Erlin's Eye that had become my friends and, in some cases, my family. I loved how this narrative arc felt personalized to me because everything that happened resulted from how I chose to use my dice over the dozens of cycles I lived through.

With various narrative options in place, I could have ended up as terrible as the corpos I was trying to take down, but I didn't. I appreciated that Citizen Sleeper allowed for so many narrative branches because the more I played it, the more it felt like my own story. It would have been disappointing to end it pigeonholed into a set ending that didn't align with my actions. If I failed one story, I might see those consequences play out in another. If I succeeded somewhere else, I might open up an entirely new storyline that affects not just one character but also others I met earlier. Above all of this interconnectedness, I was especially blown away by how my in-game actions connected to Citizen Sleeper's themes, which, at its core, is a game about trying to survive under capitalism as an outsider.


In the end, though, Citizen Sleeper is less a critique of capitalism itself, which in its defense has been done countless times in the cyberpunk genre, and more an opportunity to showcase how those under its thumb persevere and succeed despite it. Its hopeful and inspiring message is backed by a branching, heartfelt narrative, and a great gameplay loop, making it tough to put down. Add in its enriching visual style and my favorite musical score of 2022 so far, and Citizen Sleeper is a game I'll be thinking about for years to come.

9

Hmm, it does sound intriguing. I wonder if this another sleeper hit after NORCO. Anyone playing this?
 

Ivan

Arcane
Joined
Jun 22, 2013
Messages
6,462
Citizen Sleeper
strengths: atmospheric, nice audio (ambient and soundtrack).

Disliked the gameplay loop of ticking off chores to get to the stories. It reminded me of Spiritfarer in this regard and why I also dropped that game. The actual verbs the game provides you with which to engage with it were repetitious, didn't make me feel like the skill system/build system was warranted, and I also disliked how the writing told me how the PC was supposed to feel. I did like how the game pulls no punches when you a fail a quest. At the very least, I can say that each time the game told me I had failed a quest, it felt very organic and real/true to the setting. It didn't feel gamey like oh you killed NPC B so now you can't net your prize. The failure states were handled organically and I found them to be satisfyingly real.

It's a neat title with some nice ideas, some neat stories, but much of it was tucked away in a gameplay loop that I found stale, and boring the longer I played.

I'll see how I feel after giving it another boot to see if I stick it out, but even writing these words, I'm not excited to return to it, at least not like I was when I first booted it and was excited at the prospect of this being an RPG/or at least featured stronger RPG elements.
 

Rephyrnomicon

Literate
Joined
May 19, 2022
Messages
23
I actually really enjoyed my time with this one, though I don't give a flying fuck about "wokeism" or whatever it is the average codexian retard is so afraid of these days.
 

cyborgboy95

News Cyborg
Joined
Aug 24, 2019
Messages
1,747
https://store.steampowered.com/news/app/1578650/view/3347877220446060011
THREE NEW DLC EPISODES
Jump Over The Age and Fellow Traveller are thrilled to reveal that Citizen Sleeper will be receiving new story content via three FREE episodic updates, the first of which “FLUX”, arrives in July (date TBC). Episodes 2 and 3 are currently planned for release in October and early 2023 respectively, however dates are still to be confirmed.

THE ROADMAP
8a41c042c9c9128b1912e7a6233166dd00230827.jpg


EPISODE 1: FLUX
In the first episode, FLUX, pressures in the Helion system have brought the first ships of a refugee flotilla to the Eye. You will meet and help those that get on-station before the quarantine locks them out.

These episodes will tell a continuing story across all three updates, expanding on the wider narrative of the Helion System, the star system in which the Eye orbits. Each episode will also introduce new characters, the first of which we are revealing today: Eshe.

INTRODUCING ESHE
7dc158f64a9ebbaef2d003ecff1c4c5dc3979cbd.png


Eshe is a stubborn and driven spacer, whose fate becomes tangled up in that of the refugee flotilla which had begun to arrive at the Eye. Her story will ask the player to choose how to deal with a growing crisis that could threaten the entire station.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Top Bottom