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KickStarter Kickstarter Watch.

Kz3r0

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Two projects that for now I won't put into the cash grabs but can end there pretty soon:
Aura Tactics
Martin Brandt II on Feb 22
Almost two years past the deliverable date, fantastic!

Dysis
MasterKane on May 17
No real version update for over a year and, moreover, Chris posting once in three or more months even in twitter, and even if he heve some online presence now, I cannot reliably detect it. There's still hope that at some point project will be revived in full glory, but as of now it can be condidered on hold.

Both five thosnd dollars projects, I am accepting suggestions on establishing a minimum threshold for projects to be listed, one hundred thousand dollars seems the bare minimum to me.
 

himmy

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New Europe
I am accepting suggestions on establishing a minimum threshold for projects to be listed, one hundred thousand dollars seems the bare minimum to me.

While I understand the desire to implement something like that, it would allow all sort of projects that are actually relevant to people on the Codex, like Paper Sourcerer or Telepath Tactics, to fall through the cracks and would work against the spirit of this thread.
 

Alchemist

Arcane
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Jun 3, 2013
Messages
1,439
Both five thosnd dollars projects, I am accepting suggestions on establishing a minimum threshold for projects to be listed, one hundred thousand dollars seems the bare minimum to me.
Two of my favorite Kickstarter successes I backed were well under $100k:

Paper Sorcerer: $13,151
Malevolence: $33,506

Both of those had initial goals of $5-6k.

Small indies and one-man teams can do that - depending on the scope of their project. Also some projects are just final polish to a mostly done game (like Lords of Xulima), so their target will be comparatively low too.

Honestly though, I don't really look at the main list in the OP of this thread. I just watch this thread for new posts to see what's new and what people have found. So whether it makes the list or not doesn't matter much to me.
 

Kz3r0

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Last edited:

Galdred

Studio Draconis
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[Steve gets a Kidney but I don't even get a tag.]

kaizoku

Arcane
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Feb 18, 2006
Messages
4,129
Would love for the Nexus guys to try the KS again.

But I doubt it will happen. The main guy seemed pretty butthurt about not succeeding. Maybe he lost money in the process.
 

almondblight

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Aug 10, 2004
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So she told the guy she was horrible during the campaign and he still went with her?

Furthermore, Agness keeps claiming that I ruined her reputation. And yet in an email dated 3 June 2013, Agness openly admits to having a bad reputation in the Japanese games industry and warned me that she might ruin my campaign due to her bad reputation.

Then on 4 Jun 2013, Agness openly admits that the Japanese public have a dislike for her, and spoke negatively about her, even before my Kickstarter. She cannot blame me for her bad reputation - it has always been toxic. In fact her reputation was so bad in Japan, she left her job at DeNA. Agness openly admits that she resigned from DeNA, because her manager said that she's "not the kind of person they want as a part of the organisation."

When you raise $117,000 for a project you might want to spend 5 minutes finding someone who's not psycho to work with.
 

kaizoku

Arcane
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Feb 18, 2006
Messages
4,129
Would love for the Nexus guys to try the KS again.

But I doubt it will happen. The main guy seemed pretty butthurt about not succeeding. Maybe he lost money in the process.

Of course, those flash kickstarter videos would cost a few thousand to produce.

IIRC they actually started developing the new game. They showed some of new features in some of the videos/interviews.
 

Infinitron

I post news
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RPG Wokedex Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker [Steve gets a Kidney but I don't even get a tag.] Pathfinder: Kingmaker
Tormentum - Dark Sorrow: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/tormentum-dark-sorrow

Torment-inspired adventure game? Goal is $9000.



20140529044559-Grafika_na_indie_czesc_1_03.jpg


  • Dark adventure from the border of dream and reality
  • Unique, hand-drawn illustrations
  • 3 lands, differing in terms of architecture, weather, and creatures dwelling in them
  • Moral choices which will have an impact on the game’s end
  • A variety of riddles integrated into the game in a form of different locks, traps, gates, etc.
  • Outstanding soundtrack with more than 20 tracks
  • Characters with unique personalities, which will help or try to prevent the hero in reaching his goal
  • Incredible atmosphere
  • Languages: English, Polish
  • 4-6 hours of gameplay

Greenlight: http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=262150511
 

Blaine

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Grab the Codex by the pussy

Infinitron

I post news
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Messages
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RPG Wokedex Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker [Steve gets a Kidney but I don't even get a tag.] Pathfinder: Kingmaker
http://www.theverge.com/2014/6/3/5775548/kickstarter-s-next-campaign
Kickstarter’s next campaign
The original crowdfunder is loosening its rules and opening the floodgates


IMG_9391.0_standard_1020.0.jpg


When NBC Nightly News aired a segment last week about the revival of the public television show Reading Rainbow, the anchor didn’t pause to explain where the money came from. “Longtime host LeVar Burton launched a Kickstarter campaign to bring it back,” correspondent Janet Shamlian gushed, as the camera showed numbers ticking up on the project’s funding page. “His goal was $1 million in 35 days. He had it in 11 hours.”

In the past, Shamlian would have explained that Kickstarter was a crowdfunding website, or perhaps “a new kind of social network helping artists fund their projects,” as the network explained it in 2011. No longer. People know what Kickstarter is now – the term is eight times more popular on the internet than the generic “crowdfunding” – and they know how it works. They understand that projects don’t get funded until they hit their goals, they realize they won’t get their money back if the project fails, and they get that Kickstarter is not supposed to be a store.

Kickstarter has raised $981 million on its way to becoming a household name. Yet that money comes from a small number of projects: just 62,932 campaigns have been funded. If everyone has the potential to be a creator, as the crowdfunding movement would have us believe, there are many, many more people to reach.

ready.jpg


That’s partly why the company is announcing two major changes today aimed at presenting a "simpler, friendlier Kickstarter," in the words of co-founder and CEO Yancey Strickler. First, the rules for creators have been simplified from about 1,000 words to less than 300, and previously banned products are allowed back on the platform. Second, projects can now opt to "Launch Now" and bypass Kickstarter’s approval process.

At first, the changes may seem like a capitulation to market forces over principles. In January, Indiegogo raised $40 million from its own investors, the largest financing round for any crowdfunding startup, in part because its liberal acceptance policy has allowed it to grow fast. Campaigns on Indiegogo aren’t vetted, and its rules are ultra-simple: anything that isn’t illegal or dangerous, goes. "Indiegogo has no opinions," founder Slava Rubin told The Fiscal Times. "It has no judgment." Indiegogo has hosted more than 200,000 campaigns in more than 200 countries compared to Kickstarter’s 149,541 in five countries.

By contrast, Kickstarter has always seemed a bit restrictive. "Everything on Kickstarter must be a project," the old rules began. "Every project on Kickstarter must fit into one of our categories." The rules prohibited ultraspecific things like sunglasses, bath and beauty products, hardware projects that offered rewards of more than one item, and software projects not run by developers. Charities and "fund my life"-style campaigns were blocked. Instead, Kickstarter emphasized its goal of funding creative ventures with a shareable result. When Kickstarter rejected writer Brenda Winter Hansen for trying to raise money for workshop tuition, she went with Indiegogo.

kickstarter_office.jpg


Under the new rules, Hansen’s campaign might pass. In general, Kickstarter will now only prohibit things that are illegal, regulated, or dangerous, Strickler says. Pretty much anything else will fly, he says, as long as creators are honest about what they’re doing. Charity, genetically modified organisms, and misleading photo-realistic renderings are still forbidden under the new rules, but sunglasses, bath and beauty products, and many items that were banned over time are back on.

Strickler has never been happy about the fact that a creator’s Kickstarter experience starts with an approval process. "You always hate saying no to someone," he says. "[But] for a brand or a community to have definition, there have to be rules. Every website in the world has a list of what’s on topic and what’s off-topic. But you want those to be as broadly defined and clearly understandable as possible, and I don’t think that’s always been the case."

k3.jpg


Kickstarter’s human approval process was never billed as an endorsement — it consisted of a simple check for rule violations that could take as little as five minutes. That check will now be done by an algorithm that looks at keywords in the campaign, the creator’s track record on Kickstarter, and other metrics to create a profile of the project and compare it to similar projects that have been approved, rejected, flagged, and removed. If the campaign passes the algorithmic check, the creator can choose to either launch without a human review or request feedback from the Kickstarter team.

This will speed up the approval process for new campaigns and give staffers time to work in more depth with creators, Strickler says. Kickstarter was already approving 78 percent of new campaigns, and 44 percent of those get fully funded, according to the company.

If the history of the company were divided into eras, Strickler would say there are roughly four. The first would be 2002 to 2009, Before Kickstarter, when Strickler and his co-founders Perry Chen and Charles Adler were dreaming up the site. The second would be 2009 to March of 2012, Before Double Fine — the first "blockbuster" project that collected more than $3 million for a video game and raised expectations for funding levels. The next would be After Double Fine, which saw the famous "Kickstarter is not a store" blog post and a number of multimillion-dollar projects.

This would be a new one, Strickler says. We’ll call it the Mature Era. The site is "the premier place" for crowdfunded projects, Strickler says, and the company boasts a brand recognition and community of repeat backers not found on other sites. Even though Indiegogo has surpassed it in size, Kickstarter’s campaigns are much more likely to meet their goals and have raised more money total.

The question is whether Kickstarter can loosen up its rules without compromising its cachet and attracting scams, crazies, and purveyors of schlock. "The world has changed in response to Kickstarter and we’re changing with it," Strickler says. Hopefully that doesn’t mean being overrun by knock-off Ray-Bans.
 

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