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The Codex Reviews: Two World II

Discussion in 'General RPG Discussion' started by themadhatter, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. themadhatter Novice

    themadhatter
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    Given that I recently completed the game and a few reviews have begun to appear, I thought it appropriate to chime in on a thread specifically created to house the thoughts of those stalwart Codexians who managed to complete such (fess up).

    Less a "proper" review, not that the mainstream media sets a high-standard, than a list, my thoughts follow: a solid 7 of 10 game, nothing more, assuming you are sufficiently enlightened to recognize that a 5 on said scale denotes an "average" title.

    POSITIVE:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Improved Graphics - expected of any modern game, yet the results are actually quite stunning. Their use of tessellation was a welcome surprise.

    Improved Engine - the draw distance, supported polygon count, inclusion of higher-level physics, godrays and the like are all excellent but it's the stability that astonishes most. That and the general optimization allow a relatively modest computer to run the program at the same level of complexity as a high-end machine. I personally tested it on both a Nvidia 8800 GT and a 460 GTX (albeit each were running on computers with the same OS and amount of RAM) and found the differences to be negligible. The 8800 tended to choke in high-density areas, such as a crowded street, yet otherwise produced similar results across the board. Of course, the developers proudly boasted of optimizing the game for a steady 30 FPS at all times (for the consoles, naturally) and it's fair game to say that most computer gaming rigs are just as powerful (well, decidedly more so) than your modern console. That's not to detract from the developers' accomplishment, however, given how atrocious other ports/multi-platform titles have been (ala GTA IV, Saints Row 2, et cetera).

    Improved Dialogue - I'll leave it at this: the characters speak actual, coherent English.

    Innovative Magic System - I'll address my negative thoughts on the system below, but for now let it suffice that it allows for a great deal of creative input and customization. Furthermore, it can be legitimately fun to play as a mage, given the myriad options available for causing some genuine mayhem.

    Improved Collision/Pathfinding - From NPCs to monsters the pathfinding is significantly improved over the first, wherein numerous monsters could pile up at the base of a single rock, NPCs frequently clipped through the scenery and other assorted issues cropped up. While this arguably should have been merged into the "Improved Engine" category, the mere fact that the horses no longer behave so erratically as a result merits its own notation.

    Improved Quests - By which I mean that, once or twice (as I recall) you'll take part in a quest that may be resolved via any one of multiple solutions. Now that's forward thinking... if only there was a genre of games that focused on this sort of thing...


    NEGATIVE:
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    Graphics - A fine counterpoint to my praise above must begin with the graphics. While significantly improved, and displaying some genuine skill, they nonetheless suffer as a result of needless and, at times, laborious repetition. Copy-paste design is evident throughout much of the world, from the environment (particularly the dungeons, which are akin to Oblivion in that all are built on the same standard tileset with minor aesthetic changes thrown in to mix things up) to the NPCs. This may be excused by virtue of technological/resource limitations, however, it could easily have been averted by simply trimming down on the world size. Quality over quantity, mates.

    Engine - Bloom - Utilized significantly less than one might expect from a modern game, it nonetheless makes frequent and jarring appearances. Looking at the "sun" is not advisable.

    Engine - HDR - The true bane of TW2's lighting department, the sheer amount of vitriolic comments dedicated to the HDR should be sufficient to convey just how dreadful the developer's implementation is: akin to being hit with a strobe each time you shift from light to darkness or load a new area/save.

    Engine - Tessellation - As noted above, I was surprised they used it ...and disappointed at how sloppily they did so. Understandably it is a relatively "new" feature, making an appearance in few other engines (at present, the only ones that come immediately to mind are the Unigine and GeoMod), hence the inclusion earned it a plus, but when your tessellation causes multiple "rock" walls to warp inward not out, you have a serious problem. Seen most often in the introductory dungeon.

    Engine - Motion Blur - I found the use to be maddening. In classic console-fashion, each movement of the camera is accompanied by blur. As are many combat animations. Indeed, just about any motion will set it off, though the most egregious is the insistence on using it when running. The character runs at what might be dubbed a steady "trot" and his sprint is hardly deserving of the title. Hint to developers: reserve the use of motion blur for legitimately fast characters or objects. In short: is riding a galloping horse with motion blur okay? Yes. Is it okay EVERY bloody time you run at speeds approaching a STAGGERING twelve miles per hour? No.

    Engine - Options - Perhaps the most infuriating aspect of the engine is found in the simple inability of the user to customize much about it. While toggles for the expected options (Resolution, VSync, et cetera) are present, the much needed HDR/Bloom are not, nor is there much differentiation in certain options such as "Shadows" which often impact graphical performance the most. Options to adjust the draw distance of foliage versus characters versus buildings/items/terrain and so on are also missing, to say nothing of the utter lack of a benchmarking utility. While the menu screen may well be used to test certain options (detail level, et cetera) it is impossible to tell what --- if any --- effect you've made upon the performance or aesthetic appeal of the game when you swap the "Grass Distance" down from the default "10/10" nor, by way of a further example, if changing the "Physics" from "High" to "Low" will impair... well, anything! Furthermore, keyboard customization is lacking, as the screen suffers from classic consolitis, with an overly large panel containing a list that could easily have been summed up in one window. That it also lacks support for select mouse input (such as the side-buttons on certain Logitech/Razr models) should be enough said about the lackluster porting in this respect.

    GUI - Horrible! Just atrocious. Again, a feature obviously designed around large-screen television systems and console kiddies, with grotesquely massive icons, no support for drag-and-drop, nor the ability to stack/split items or sell in bulk. That's right, if you want to divest yourself of those twenty useless traps, be prepared to click twenty-freaking-times! The "glass" effect backing the icons is also annoying, given that it both obscures the icon in low light conditions and has a tendency to (at times) intensify or focus the HDR-effect in high-light ones.

    Dialogue - Subtitles - Suffice to say, while the characters are speaking English, they do not always say what the subtitles do, nor are said subtitles as free of grammatical/spelling errors as is expected of a professional studio. Also, while rather nitpicky, I should point out that this is yet another game that failed to pick up the [CC] banner originally hoisted by Doom 3 and Half-Life 2. Kinda sad, actually.

    Magic System - Restrictive - While the system allows for some creativity and improvisation, it should be pointed out how horrendously restrictive it is. A certain aspect of this stems from its inherently unbalanced nature (noted below), namely the Mana limit, but the cut down options also play a pivotal role. For instance, damage modifiers could be stacked in the first game, in addition to stacking the actual spell card. Here, cards alone may be stacked. This renders the creation of early-game mega-spells all but impossible (ideal from a balancing perspective), but similarly impairs the ability to create them come the end-game (which is where it falls apart).

    Magic System - Unbalanced - As a pure mage you will encounter countless situations in which death is the only option. Sadly, it's your death I am discussing. Quest after quest will shove you into small chambers blatantly geared toward a melee build. This means you die, then again, then again, then you mix up your magic and eke out a victory by spamming summons or blasting through all your health potions.
    The flipside is that in the open a pure mage is a juggernaut: unstoppable... at least in the early game.
    That, right there, is the core of the poorly balanced misfit that is the magic system of Two Worlds 2. Early game mages will find that a single, simple spell will allow them to churn through absolutely anything in their path. Anything. This becomes even more egregious if they should be wise enough to increase their mana regeneration skill (which, oddly unlike health regeneration, functions both in and out of combat), resulting in an early game character that --- quite literally --- cannot run out of mana. I ran from one end of the savanna to the other, blasting off fireballs willy-nilly at 98 MP per spell, while recovering 105 MP after each shot.
    Again, the flipside is that the mana regeneration is capped at 105 MP per second. That's it.
    This spells utter doom for the creative aspect of the magic system, as you are forced to abandon your most powerful spell (or, at least, abandon the option of upgrading it) as high-damage versions swiftly mount into the 1000MP-per-shot range. At level 23 I was capable of firing my most powerful fire spell (with the maxed Spell-Cost-Decrease skill) a mere three times ere I ran out of mana. Worse yet, that spell wasn't even fully stacked! I had seven fire cards stacked, along with four missiles (for added speed on the firebolt), yet it still cost in excess of 1000 MP!
    Long story short: as a mage you either rape or get raped. There is no middle ground. My mage-chastity has been violated...

    Quests - Fetch. Kill. Run here, run there, listen to a cutscene in AssCreed fashion (You can move! It doesn't matter at all because you cannot actually DO ANYTHING in them, but you can move!), then run back. Quest Complete! Seriously, that is nine-tenths of the game. The rest is discovering one locked door/tent (how do you lock a tent?) after another, only to have it magically unlocked the instant someone mentions that you should run there, watch a cutscene, kill something, then run back.

    Riding a Horse - Apparently inspired by insipid casual games the developer's opted to remove any shadow of doubt that they and they alone can bollox up riding a horse like none other. In the first Two Worlds horses were drawn to trees like magnets and turned like a Buick without wheels. Here they are ridden via a minigame. Yep, read that again. M-i-n-i-g-a-m-e. The worst aspect of this minigame is not its mere presence, which could very well be worked into a decent mechanic (spur the horse to move, spur too much and get thrown), but the location of the meter that is the only way of determining just how much you've spurred the bloody thing: on the far left-hand side of the screen. What this effectively means is that you'll spend the entirety of your time attempting NOT to replicate the Two Worlds experience of running your horse into a tree as you madly whip your eyes back and forth between where your horse is headed and that infuriating little meter.
    I should also mention that you cannot immediately stop the horse. It has to slow of its own accord. You also cannot turn the horse unless it is moving, save you want to move a full ninety-degrees in one jerky motion.

    Controls - As if to further confirm that this is a Made For Consoles™ game, the developer's have opted for the modern fad of "less is more" when it comes to controls. You know, the Molyneux school of design. Derp. What we, the users, end up with is so: a stealth system that cannot be toggled via its own key, but is utilized by sheathing your weapon and then hitting the Run-key. Equally moronic (but innovative!) is the fact that the Jump-key is also the Use-key. Enjoy the countless times you attempt to pick an herb and, instead, leap over it. Want to open that chest? "Too bad, I'm hoppin' on top of it!" How about stealthing your way into a room, nicking that book on the shelf, then sneaking out? "Sorry, thought you wanted to run in there and jump on the dresser." Grand.

    Loot - Level-scaled.

    Lockpicking - Scaled to the amount you have opened. Once you hit one-hundred or so (lost actual count, which is another negative point, given how annoying the minigame is and how many locksmiths these people apparently employ) every last one becomes either an Advanced or Master lock. It's like being given a little treat every time you opt to pursue more useless level-scaled loot.

    Skills - The vast, overwhelming majority are useless (melee), over-/underpowered (magic) or merely gimmicks (archery). Yeah...yeah, I'm going to leave it at that.

    World Design - There is a massive island. MASSIVE! It is empty. EMPTY!

    NPCs - Quickly: some are immortal. Guards all carry one-hit-kill weapons that are wildly disproportionate to their status/place in the world. They share the classic "hivemind" reaction to any type of trouble, be it an aggressive animal on the proximity of town or you firing a random spell by accident.

    Notoriety - The system that tracks your deviant behavior is horrendously broken. Case in point: load up the game, run down a "city" street and bump into some people. Just brush past them, don't pull a weapon, stop running or attempt to pickpocket them (if you possess the pertinent skill). Watch in awe as your notoriety increases. I was actually gang-raped by multiple guards for doing exactly that. Talk about adding some challenge to a fetch quest. Coolest feature of the game.
    The gang-raping, not the notoriety.

    Story - ...really? It's a quasi-hack and slash game with RPG elements, not Dostoyevsky's magnum opus.
     
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  2. Hobo Elf Arcane

    Hobo Elf
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    The magic system sounds kind of lame. Shame, I might actually skip this game because of that. Never liked playing melee.
     
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  3. Destroid Arcane

    Destroid
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  4. Dyskolos Cipher

    Dyskolos
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    How could anyone think this was a workable idea especially with fucking 50+ keys right in front of you. Thank you xbox.

    You may not be able to answer this but how playable is it compared to the original on release? Since that one ended up mostly palatable after patching maybe this one too will incline a bit.

    Very good review by the way
     
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  5. made Arcane

    made
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    Was about to write down some impressions myself as I just finished the game. I pretty much agree with most of your observations, though your final score is too generous for all the shortcomings you mention. 5/10 is what I'd give it in its current state.

    Way too boring towards the end. No more side quests (if you can call them that anyway) after the azn island, just linear grind for the last 1/3 of the game. Bonus points for OMG PLOT TWIST and somewhat satisfying ending though. 24 hours total, doing most quests and skipping very little dialogue (since some of it is actually quite good).

    The crafting/item upgrade system deserves special mention because it's kinda cool if broken. It works well at the start as you loot tons of junk weapons/armor from humanoid mobs and, provided you put up with incessant clicking, constantly upgrade your gear. As the game progresses you mostly face monsters that drop nothing but the odd tongue or eye so you quickly run out of ingredients while the cost of new upgrades skyrockets. At the end my mid-game weapons were far superior to any new merchant loot because I couldn't afford to upgrade the new stuff. I'm not even sure how mages can upgrade their robes at all because fabric is in such short supply. I guess you could abuse the dice game for infinite money and then buy gear from vendors to break down into parts but... lol noty.
     
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  6. coldcrow Prophet Patron

    coldcrow
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    My impressions:

    getting game @ pirate coven -> Hahal@Facegen -> look@those tits -> cool gfx and engine -> hmm fetchquests,mmo crafting,conosle UI -> ow! my head! the blur and DoF hurts me eyes -> getting massively bored -> uninstalled
     
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  7. CrimHead Scholar

    CrimHead
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    Y'know that's pretty much my reaction to every current gen game I attempt to play :S
     
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  8. Raapys Arcane

    Raapys
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    Can agree with most things, but I think you've missed some when it comes to the magic system. By the end game, I had 20k'ish mana(can't remember level) and something like +5000 damage from willpower. An 8-card Force missile cost 600 mana or so with -50% mana cost skill. You can exceed the 100'ish mana per second regeneration by enchanting items with mana regen.

    There's also little reason to bother with damage missiles; a far better alternative is to just use the way overpowered earthquake/stone shower spell which insta-kills anything, including bosses, for 200-300'ish mana or so. As for keeping it easy in confined spaces, simply use a invisibility spell to get in position before attacking.

    So in short, if you're getting raped as a mage no matter the situation, you're doing something wrong. Magic is way overpowered.
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 1
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  9. themadhatter Novice

    themadhatter
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    Thank you.

    As for playability it is vastly superior. Again, most of this stems from the lack of crippling bugs (or, at least, the appearance of such) yet there is a level of polish in TW2 that was lacking in the original. I'd anticipate that most "patches" will come in the form of DLC and multiplayer balancing.

    Thanks for the input, mate, and you are quite right. As I said, mixing up your magic can definitely change the result of those melee-oriented situations, but ultimately you do end up either overpowered or completely unprepared. In short: I agree with what you are saying, sorry if that wasn't clear.

    First, I'd love to hear those impressions. Apart from sharing my own that was the only purpose in making this thread. I mean, I'd read through the other TW2 threads but they tend to devolve into the usual Codex chicanery.

    As for the score, well, I'd stand by it. Compared against other recent releases I've played (Arcania, FM Evolved, Dead Rising 2 ...good grief what has happened to me?) it surpasses each in myriad ways yet remains devoid of any genuine depth.

    I knew that I forgot something!
    Thanks for mentioning that, hopefully it is addressed in a patch. Having to wait after each upgrade for their little puff-of-smoke animation to complete is infuriating. That and the inability to just upgrade directly to whatever item-level you desire.
     
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  10. RK47 collides like two planets pulled by gravity Patron

    RK47
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    Dead State Divinity: Original Sin
    I really despise the way they locked you away from later skills by making it too expensive to get and rely on some rewards placement when you do quests. I really, really wanted to try out the trapping skills but after 2-3 hours, there's no sign of getting it aside from blowing 12,800 gold on the first town merchant.

    Did anyone manage to even figure out the musician mini-game? First time I tried and the speed owned me. I rather just roll die for 1,000. That's pretty stupid IMO. Why break your own game economy?

    This game is in a real need of modding. Combat is always shitty in practice when 2 out of 3 styles are reliant on 'firing from range, not getting hit'. Playing Ranger at the moment and the only threat was getting 3 hit killed by strong mobs. Otherwise, eat 8 arrows when you come close bitches.

    With such a straightforward upgrading system and botched ranged balance in the combat, the game won't break new grounds. Entertainment wore off after 2-3 hours of one shotting wild animals outside town. And the stealth system that does not allow me to kill any seated monsters with no good reason. After all the trouble of sneaking around, I might as well just unload 8 arrows point-blank.
     
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  11. Jaesun Fabulous Moderator

    Jaesun
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    You seem very passionate about this game RK47.
     
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  12. RK47 collides like two planets pulled by gravity Patron

    RK47
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    I never laughed so much at a bad implementation of extra features, that's all.

    They put a lot of effort into it, but it came out so wrong. I think this is the only game this year where I have to pause a moment to laugh out loud after seeing many wacky things in the game.
     
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  13. Aothan Magister

    Aothan
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    by reliant do you mean it is mostly necessary to avoid melee combat or that most encounters are (too) easily matched with ranged attacks ?

    the first impressions I read from the codex on Two Worlds II did make things sound good in a hack n slash way. Which suits my inclinations often enough. However after which a lot of criticism has been leveled at the game so that I am no longer too sure what can be assumed of these aspects. Of course criticism is fairly typical and I know to be mindful of the usual sentiments.

    even as a hack n slash enthusiast and being relatively easy to please by Codex standard I was a critique of the first game. The combat animations were so ungainly for the setting (i.e. quasi-Shaolin techniques in a medieval fantasy setting) and poorly displayed that I was forced into the practise of magicks ! And, yet always, magic was blatantly, mind numbingly, overpowered..I had to leave.

    now from what I have read, the swordplay in Two Worlds II might warrant interest, so I am curious about the possibility for engaging gameplay if a player does not allow their character to become too easy to use and/or overpowered.
     
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  14. RK47 collides like two planets pulled by gravity Patron

    RK47
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    Early level archery skill unlock = Multishot. Fire X number of arrows at once. This sucks at long range, however, when you consider this could launch upwards of 10 arrows at point blank, and with sufficient upgrades your bows are going to 3 shot kill most encounters, guess what happens? Yep, you just run around till the multi-shot skill is ready then fire your shot gun. 10 arrows right in their face. Dead man.

    Melee is a pain till you get good weapons. Healing potions, blocking, killed while in animation are part of the pain of being in close combat. It doesn't help that there are only 4 stats.

    HP+++++increase HP

    Melee+++++increase melee damage / requirement to use heavy weapons & skills

    Ranged+++++increase ranged damage / requirement to use ranged weapons & skills

    Magic+++++increase magic damage / requirement to use magic staffs & skills

    I did give melee a try, the game allows you to change your attributes in mid-game. So I removed all points from ranged skills, and ranged attribute and moved it to melee and HP.

    While things die quick with a decent heavy hander, you still have to work with weapon switching because certain mobs are resistant to slashing etc, but I found it more productive just to side step those mobs and run. The enemies are hardly able to catch you when you sprint away.

    I invested in 100% damage resistance upon blocking, 1 power thrust for sword, 1 defense break attack, and a spinning area attack. That's it, really. There's not much you can do but block and counter attack. Or initiate a defense break attack when opponent is blocking, then follow up with the thrust. These attacks deal bonus % damage depending on skill level. By level 20 or so, you probably hit 200% damage bonus that things die pretty quick. Some minor skills like Dirty Fighting will blind opponents temporarily, but that only works 20% of the time till you upgrade it, or Humbling Blow 6% chance to knock humanoid to the ground and finish him off.

    All the above are so busy compared to just switching to blunt arrows or sharp arrows + multi-shotting them on the face. There are traps, but really, 10 arrows. What the fuck?
     
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  15. ortucis Prophet

    ortucis
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    After the first two failed tries I just pressed all buttons randomly and actually managed to get some money (10.. I think) at the end of the game. It's a nice concept (playing music for money if you feel like role-playing that much) but completely broken thanks to the minigame probably designed for gamepad.

    Actually, including minigames in videogames should be made illegal in California then the rest of the world. I am playing Divinity 2 again and it's refreshing how opening a fucking lock doesn't require a minigame pop-up while I am in a dungeon killing undead.

    Nothing like defeating the "terror that stalks the land" only to be defeated by a fucking minigame that won't let you get the fucking loot which is inside a fucking wooden chest you can bash open anyway with your mace of doom enchanged with fire gems shat out by a dragon FFS@#*(&$..

    :x
     
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  16. RK47 collides like two planets pulled by gravity Patron

    RK47
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    I tried bashing some locks, but I think the hit-boxes pose a problem. I cannot seem to hit certain locks. Some breaks easily while others refused to budge even with 80% chance. Kinda stupid really, but there really is no uber loot from chests. Disappointing :(
     
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  17. dr. one Augur

    dr. one
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    play the drum.
    it´s easy to perform all songs without a mistake and i regularly got around 2500 auras per show.


    as for the game, great engine, varied gameplay mechanics, very good visuals after tweaking, repetitive and way too simple quest content, poor world/dungeon design, totally unrewarding exploration.
     
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  18. Crooked Bee (no longer) a wide-wandering bee Patron

    Crooked Bee
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    Codex 2013 Codex 2014 PC RPG Website of the Year, 2015 Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire MCA Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    I quit playing TW2 after I got to the main island. :(
    Exploration in this game looked great initially, but then I realized it actually sucked. :( And here I hoped this is gonna be somewhat close to G2.

    The only thing I really liked is the magic system. Not the balance, but the idea.
     
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  19. ricolikesrice Arcane

    ricolikesrice
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    exploration, combat, itemization and character development suck on Oblivion-like levels, stopped playing 9 hours in after being blinded by all the ambition (and of course bloom :lol:) initially this game seemed to have.

    here s why:

    exploration:

    -mostly generic copy paste world design, boring small dungeons
    (from what little i played of oblivion i think it had bigger and more interesting dungeons )

    -randomized, level-scaled (not 100% sure but looks that way) loot
    is not really a good thing to motivate adventurers to go exploring (see oblivion)

    -fairly linear with areas cut off from exploration unless you have the appropiate quest

    combat:

    -i havent spent a single talent point into anything but lockpicking, i.e. no warrior skills, no crafting skills allowing me overpowered equipment or anything like that ..... yet i am (was) button mashing my way through easily playing on HARD difficulty. blocking / using special attacks doesnt appear to be necessary. i admit i quit the game now at lvl 18, but from all i read on various forums it only gets easier from here.
    granted, similar to the first TW you require a bit of timing when going against higher level opponents to dodge their otherwise deadly attacks .... but the same can be said about even the worst codex hated "popamole" whatever games.... and those few higher level opponents are very rare thanks to the mostly linear progression.

    -allowing the player to use health and mana potions for instant effect with no drawbacks whatsoever is really, really retarded (mind you, i rarely needed them but still .... ), what is wrong with those people ?

    -allowing the player to swap entire sets of gear with the click of a button in the middle of combat is really, really retarded (mind you, you dont seem to need it ), what is wrong with those people ? and to even hype it as a great feature :roll:

    -boring enemies with little variety that dont really require the player to think / switch tactics etc.

    itemization:

    -you get lots of junk but its all quantity, no quality. a few of x% stat more here and y% stat more there but no really unique, interesting items, neither in terms of stats nor looks nor history.

    -as already said above, it appears all (or mostly, didnt finish game) to be level-scaled, so you only start finding certain items once you have the proper level.

    character development:

    -is a sad joke. why you would skill anything in the assassin tree for example other than lockpicking is a mystery. while looking through the talents i couldnt find anything that made me go "hey i wanna be lvl 20 right now so i can do this and that ...."

    -as you could already see i didnt touch the magic system at all because i couldnt be arsed too. making your own spells and having lots of variety there sure sounds tempting ... but whats the point if the game is so ridicoulus easy ? i m pretty sure it may be fun but get old pretty fast.

    mind you i didnt talk about story, atmosphere, c&c whatever (from what i saw all of that is pretty bad too though an improvement over TW1). i judged TW2 merely as a hack n slash / exploration game and as that its unfortunately total shit. now i m hoping Divinity 2: Dragon Knight Saga makes up for this disappointment.

    from combat to quest design this game pretty much plays by itself, i was constantly reminded of my (short)time with assassins creed II and not really suprised the game gets rave reviews from the mainstream press.

    that being said i wouldnt be suprised if this turns out to be another SOZ, i.e. totally shit game getting codex credit because "hey, at least its not from beth/bio" with all those who disagree being labeled as skyway-wannabes ;)

    maybe i m spoiled because unlike most of the codex i ve actually played quite a few MMORPGs (uh oh ..... ) and while they may be the devil in other ways (high end raiding, grinding, etc. etc. etc.) its pretty hard to find a MMORPG that DOESNT have more interesting area design/exploration/dungeon/combat/itemization/character-development/combat and even quest design than Oblivion / Two Worlds (2).

    and some of them, like guildwars or DDO ... are even FREE. (besides that, as flawed as AOC/WAR -for example- may be.... you get both for 10 bucks with 30 days free time... beats paying 50 bucks and quitting bored after 2 days in TW2).

    edit: i only played 8-9 hours, quit at lvl 18 as i couldnt force myself to keep playing, obviously i cannot judge the game fully as i havent played through it 5-times. i m sure it gets MUCH better at lvl 19 + and apologize to anyone who s feelings i might have hurt.
     
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  20. ortucis Prophet

    ortucis
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,018
    I found it annoying that you get new equipment (not just with new stats) only after you are awarded something new or find something new in a cave somewhere (which doesn't happen very often.. both cases). So you go through level after level with merchants getting same equipment you are wearing but with +1/2/3/4 level (of equipment).

    This is annoying, mostly because if you spend some points in smithing (which I did as a warrior class setup), you end up upgrading the equipment you carry by yourself anyway and since there is no obvious way to get new loot, you end up buying the upgraded level armor/weapon from merchants in hope of upgrading them further.. only to end up being rewarded by something even better by a ranom side quest (yes, new equipment awards are in obscure side-quests, not main).

    *reads what he wrote*.. Err, what I am trying to say is that the loot in TW2 sucks.

    Anyways, I like some quests, like breaking someone out of prison, playing a bodyguard, etc. They tried to vary them nicely. If you want truly inane quests, go play Drakensang (eg. 6 fedex quests by same guy to same location but you have to come back over and over to get new parcel to deliver).

    As far as level design is concerned, I like it. It looks inspired from Assassins Creed, which is a good thing (AA series has beautiful level design) but too bad they got TOO inspired and copied the "boring NPC's with 2 quest givers per town" bit from AA as well.

    I have read complaints about horse riding but it didn't bother me, got used to it fast. What I DID hate though was the fact that they removed the "horse-fighting" or whatever the hell smacking a person on ground with your weapon is called.. it was fun in the first game.



    PS: WORST FUCKING INVENTORY EVER! I would ignore the console-friendly icon sizes if not for the fact that the background of the inventory is transparent. I end up positioning game camera in such a way that the level with massive bloom on white surface isn't blinding me while I am trying to scroll through 2000 items in my list.

    "Lets make it TRULY next-gen. Lets streamline the background of inventory by making it transparent. That'll put Oblivion to shame."
    - TW2 developer. :retarded:
     
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  21. made Arcane

    made
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Messages:
    5,101
    Location:
    Germany
    That may be true at the start, I don't remember really. But later on merchant inventory scales to your level and you get a new set of weapons/armor every 2 lvls.
     
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  22. ortucis Prophet

    ortucis
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    Messages:
    2,018
    Well, I got this stupid hat a level ago. I have been wearing that armor for like 6 lvls so far (lvl 25 at the moment).

    [​IMG]

    Whelp, too bored to continue, going to uninstall and maybe continue next year or something (besides, had NWN2: MOTB on hold cause of this). I can take only so much of "next-gen" these days.. :M
     
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  23. Fens Ford of the Llies

    Fens
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Messages:
    1,899
    Location:
    pitcairn
    so at least the houses have doors this time... a definite improvement
     
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  24. RK47 collides like two planets pulled by gravity Patron

    RK47
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2006
    Messages:
    28,305
    Location:
    Not Here
    Dead State Divinity: Original Sin
    Yeah it's always disheartening to find a locked door to caves, obviously intended for quests.

    I'm wondering if I missed anything, but why do I have to click 4 times just to make a single potion? And how do I buy stuff in stacks? Clicking 20 times on lockpicks buys drove me nuts. CTRL, SHIFT, ALT clicks does NOTHING.
     
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  25. themadhatter Novice

    themadhatter
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    46
    ...what?
    Is that a poorly executed joke, some obscure meme I've overlooked or did we just play different games?

    As I recall, Two Worlds had doors which -- functionally -- were superior to those of TW2 for one simple reason: they separated parts of the same seamless world, as opposed to Two Worlds 2's use of distinct cells separated by "doors" (ala The Witcher and Oblivion).

    Aye, mate, couldn't agree more.
    Still, the locked tent gets to me the most. I can think of logical reasons why a door might be locked or otherwise impassable, even in a game that boasts a lockpicking system (the lock has jammed, the door is nailed shut, barricaded ...not a real door, whatever), but a tent? How? Did they sew it shut?
     
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