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Wildermyth - procedural storytelling tactical RPG

Lhynn

Arcane
Joined
Aug 28, 2013
Messages
9,250
I also got that event and I wonder if something happens if that character dies.
Yep, you got no option about it, the character dies and becomes a protector, which i have no idea what it does in game. The girl that died on mine became a fox guardian, so maybe its a fox related event in the future?
 

Zed Duke of Banville

Dungeon Master
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Oct 3, 2015
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if I just ignore it, this will go away and not be in every video game right?

We have people in this same thread, praising this SJW sh1t.

Wont even pirate this one for free.
Not to defend the inclusion of the unnecessary options, but by default every randomly-generated player-character is cisnormative and heterosexual. For that matter, every PC in my first campaign was randomly designed with an appearance fitting the typical fantasy pseudo-medieval setting, as were the initial party in my second campaign, although later in the second campaign the randomizations broadened somewhat.

I also got that event and I wonder if something happens if that character dies.
In the epilogue to the campaign, I received a relevant post-script for that character. Not sure if anything happens if the character perishes prematurely.
 

Thac0

Time Mage
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Apr 30, 2020
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this good?

You need to put in the work.
If you get emotionally attached to your characters it is great. You can write their little stories, see them interact and grow and change.
If not it is boring, the raw mechanics for combat and even the actual game of taking control of the map before a time limit runs out is mediocre to garbage.
I made the mistake of hastily pressing random on the characters until I got halfway decent ones the first time, for a proper experience you should fully customise and name them, a bit like pen&paper characters, in order to get invested in them.
 

baud

Arcane
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Septentrion
RPG Wokedex Strap Yourselves In Pathfinder: Kingmaker
Wont even pirate this one for free.
Do you pay for your other pirated games though?

well, I sometime buy games I've first pirated (like this one, for example)

Fighters: Your fighting force, these are the heavy hitters, the tanks, the vanguard. They will easily rack up the most kills. They retire at a young age though, and arent good at scouting, so you kind of have preemptively start working on one or two new recruits. A weak fighting force on the last chapter will be crippling if you dont prepare. There are several ways to make these guys into monsters in the field, but you need to have a plan and stick with it, and get lucky with the options you get on level up.

Hunters: they fit the rogue/ranger archetype got access to hiding, but are otherwise pretty weak both in terms of offense and defense. You still need them to scout zones faster and are nice to have in a few encounters, having 1 per team seems to be the sweet spot.

Last time I played in April, I found that Hunters way better than fighters, mostly with the attack from stealth, that bypass any armor. And since most enemy are melee fighters, being able to kill them before they reach you is way better than killing them in melee; though I had also lost my first fighter early in the campaign and the replacement never caught back the rest of the party (I think that's a weakness of the game, newer recruits forever lag behind the older members)

Not to defend the inclusion of the unnecessary options, but by default every randomly-generated player-character is cisnormative and heterosexual. For that matter, every PC in my first campaign was randomly designed with an appearance fitting the typical fantasy pseudo-medieval setting, as were the initial party in my second campaign, although later in the second campaign the randomizations broadened somewhat.

And you can change the appearance of your party as you wish

the actual game of taking control of the map before a time limit runs out is mediocre to garbage.
Seriously? Devs still think timers are a good idea? Hard pass.
Timers are a good idea. Besides, its not like theres a lose condition behind these, game just gets harder.
yeah, I remember failing to complete an objective in one campaign, it might have made the rest of the campaign harder, but it didn't prevent me from finishing it. So it's mostly a balancing act between clearing all the sites on the map for loot, xp, ressources and LP and bee-lining for the objective to avoid the enemy gathering too many buffs
 

Lhynn

Arcane
Joined
Aug 28, 2013
Messages
9,250
Last time I played in April, I found that Hunters way better than fighters, mostly with the attack from stealth, that bypass any armor. And since most enemy are melee fighters, being able to kill them before they reach you is way better than killing them in melee; though I had also lost my first fighter early in the campaign and the replacement never caught back the rest of the party (I think that's a weakness of the game, newer recruits forever lag behind the older members)
While hunters with rogue are pretty decent (I tend to outfit them with throwing axes so they have 2 heavy hitting attacks per round), your fighters are the ones taking the blows and dishing out the real damage, field control builds with spears are amazing, axes will chomp through bosses in one or two hits, etc.
Light armor + stunt trinkets + water elemental weapons are great for fighters too.
 

mediocrepoet

En français: poètemédiocre!
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Combatfag: Gold box / Pathfinder
Codex 2012 MCA Project: Eternity Divinity: Original Sin 2
Generally I found that the value of any of the classes depended partially on map composition (e.g. What materials the adept had to work with), the playstyle I was taking, and what skills RNG graced me with. I characters in each class that got beastly in slightly different ways and other times where the same class sucked, but they were always fairly useful in one way or another. The different equipment types available to find and craft had a decent impact as well.

(This is all from EA, YMMV)
 

Catacombs

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Timers are a good idea.
How? I'm talking about campaign-wide time limits. I'm probably in the minority of people who like to go through campaigns at his own pace. I'm fine with timers on an objective/level basis.
 

Lhynn

Arcane
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Aug 28, 2013
Messages
9,250
How? I'm talking about campaign-wide time limits. I'm probably in the minority of people who like to go through campaigns at his own pace. I'm fine with timers on an objective/level basis.
There are no campaign wide timers (At least in the 4 campaigns ive played through, still got the last one to take care of). Theres a chapter in the first campaign where you have a time limit, but it isnt a hard limit, story changes if you dont resolve the matter before the deadline, makes shit different later on (Dunno if harder).
In the same campaign, 3rd chapter i believe, theres also a sort of time limit where the rain wont stop and territories get inundated, the more you take to go to the final fight the less resources you will get at the end of the chapter, but it hardly matters as it is the last chapter.

There are also the generic campaigns without a main story, they have no limits either.
 

Catacombs

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How? I'm talking about campaign-wide time limits. I'm probably in the minority of people who like to go through campaigns at his own pace. I'm fine with timers on an objective/level basis.
There are no campaign wide timers (At least in the 4 campaigns ive played through, still got the last one to take care of). Theres a chapter in the first campaign where you have a time limit, but it isnt a hard limit, story changes if you dont resolve the matter before the deadline, makes shit different later on (Dunno if harder).
In the same campaign, 3rd chapter i believe, theres also a sort of time limit where the rain wont stop and territories get inundated, the more you take to go to the final fight the less resources you will get at the end of the chapter, but it hardly matters as it is the last chapter.

There are also the generic campaigns without a main story, they have no limits either.
Thanks for the detailed answer. The other post made it sound, to me, way worse than it actually is.
 
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Zed Duke of Banville

Dungeon Master
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this good?
Combatfags need not apply. Unfortunately
It's really those of us invested in exploration who should enjoy this game the least, as the combat is passable (though overly simplistic) and the game's focus is on procedural story-telling. Fortunately, I find enough charm in the writing and aesthetics for it to be worthwhile.

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Fredward

Scholar
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Aug 18, 2015
Messages
113
This game is delightful. I would advise against micromanaging every aspect of your characters' story and kinda let stuff happen to see who you get attached to, sometimes it's surprising. Although I say this while micromanaging a family of heroes where the mom's a white raven, the dad's a werewolf and the son gave his heart to a giant forest creature.

Difficulty works at two bisecting levels: the combat level and the campaign map level, you can adjust them independently. The longer your campaign is (ie three chapters vs five chapters makes a big difference) and the longer you take on the overland map (monsters get random boosts regularly, new cards get added to the decks and they also launch incursions to retake tiles) the harder your time will be. On longer campaigns your most experienced heroes are generally your oldest and they'll start retiring around chapter 4/5 which can leave you with a bunch of green recruits for the hardest fights of the game, so you need to juggle between clearing more tiles to level them vs allowing the baddies to get more and more powerful.

Individual builds are flexible, not crazily so but there's generally not 1 correct way of building a class type. They also overlap with the transformations the game has, becoming part-mountain is good for warriors for example, crow is good for rogues. Mystics are a bit left out here because the only transformation that gives a potency/spell damage bonus is the skeleton. But I'm anal and always wanna complete a transformation once started while there is no obligation to do so and usually it's best not to.

Writing is stylistically charming and the way the dialogue changes based on your toons personality is kind of impressive. Bit overly reliant on humor in the smaller, interpersonal events sometimes but overall fine. I've only done two of the structured campaigns so far and the stories there have been competent, curious to see if they get better since I think they're placed chronologically as they were finished by the devs.

I also think modding might be a straightforward affair but I'm not 100% sure about that one.
 

Van-d-all

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Jan 18, 2017
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Standin' pretty. In this dust that was a city.
Played if for few hours and I find it meh. Since I'm a story/combatfag hybrid enjoying both in equal measure I just expected more. From the bottom up - I don't mind the artstyle, I'm used to simplified shit, in fact it's pretty nice to see characters accumulate loot being visibly displayed. The typical 2AP combat is quite uninspired, and since every event everywhere ultimately leads to it, it just gets boring, as it's pretty slow paced, despite the tiny maps. The fact that enemies gain bonuses after every fight seems more like a gimmick, and quite quickly I just stopped paying attention to it. One thing I liked is the wizard mechanics requiring interfusing map elements to cast spells instead of doing it directly.

I'm sceptical of procedurally generated stuff, as while it can be done nicely (Elite/Frontier), more often it's not. Still, like with AIDungeon I was curious. Brunt of the game relies on short comic book stories, few panels long, sometimes with choices, some of which can include tests. The overall tone is rather modern-ish and lighthearted, slightly skewed towards a folklore setting. I ran through about 50 of them, and honestly I'm amazed by people who praise it - I didn't find anything overly good in neither writing or plot. Sure, it's nice how it changes wording to reflect character traits/hooks and whatnot, but after some save scamming and going through few of the same storylets with different choices it seems to mostly shoehorn player into same-ish outcomes, Talltale style.

In the end, what bored me, was the formulaic approach to gameplay - go to region, get a storylet, fight, rinse and repeat. Overarching plot elements, time management and region control try to alleviate it somewhat, but I can't imagine going through another campaign with this same, exact structure.
 
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Infinitron

I post news
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RPG Wokedex Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Kingmaker
https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2021-07-09-wildermyth-review-a-proper-rpg-marvel

Wildermyth review - a proper RPG marvel
Never trust a dream you dream in moonlight.

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Years pass as tales are written in this dazzling game of tactics and narrative, choices and memories.

Wildermyth's heroes don't look like heroes. Not at the start, anyway. With their simple felt-pen facies, dots for eyes, kinked line for a mouth, they look like the chattering cast from a '90s newspaper comic strip, like Judge Reinhold captured by a funfair caricaturist, or like the cheery helpers that I might once have found inside an Usborne kids book that's trying to teach me about the nitrogen cycle. At first, this was a little odd, a little off, even. I'm going off on a searing adventure down into the flaming mines of lord whatever and I'm taking these rickety Dilberts with me?

Many hours in, I've started to suspect that the visual design of Wildermyth's heroes is actually something very close to genius. This is a complicated, potentially rather dense game - an RPG tactics affair, with a focus on procedural narrative and character development, character bonding. Look for depths, and the ground falls away obligingly in every direction. But Wildermyth never feels complicated. Its stacked brilliances never seem to teeter around you. And for a player like me, hesitant, inpatient, perhaps a little dim, this is important. Wildermyth has riches, glorious riches, but it also wants you to stick around long enough to find them. It's wonderfully complex, but it's also simple to start playing, and simple to get your head around. Wildermyth, and Wildermyth's art, understands the importance of being approachable. You know, like a children's Usborne book that's teaching you about the nitrogen cycle.

It's more fun than that, and that's not to knock Usborne. In truth, I suspect Wildermyth is more fun than almost any game out there at the moment. I have been told to play this many times over the last year by colleagues and friends who are far smarter than me. Then they would start to describe Wildermyth, and I got a bit afraid. What awaits? Nothing less than the classic dungeons and dragons experience. A party, a quest, a bunch of nasty creeping things in the way. Twists! Loot! Choices! Lineages! Get at it. But listen: there is nothing to be afraid of. There is only joy, only treasure.

I am going to start with what initially seems to be the center of things - and a wonderful center it would make. As a tactical RPG, Wildermyth is firmly in the XCOM mould, which is to say it takes Firaxis' brilliant two-actions-per-turn template and spins it outwards into magic. XCOM could have been a frightening proposition in itself, but that two-actions business was inspired. Move your toy soldiers around. Go on. What can they do? Two things: move once, and shoot, or move twice and not shoot. Two points to spend per turn. That's the basics, a moveset that both promised mastery and threatened entrapment, a moveset that left you alone with your own tactical skills and shortcomings, and it was impossible not to get your head around that.

It's such a simple template that it copes very well with the kind of attendant complexity that makes these games truly tactical, and truly worth playing. When it's time for your party to battle in Wildermyth, you're all dropped into a little papercraft grid, folded card cut-outs providing the Mary Blair prop-trees and rocks and elven arches, as well as thickets of flame and hideous monsters and your own team even, each hero a millimeter thick, if that, but so full of heart. Turn by turn you move around, discovering enemies and attacking them, discovering enemies and being attacked. There are classes and melee weapons and ranged weapons and magic, most of which hinges on bringing rocks and trees and other parts of the scenery to life and turning it to your cause. You can hit someone with an axe, sure, but you can also blast a discus of stone from a pile of rocks, or turn tree bark into hot shrapnel and fling it at your foes. In Wildermyth, you can kill someone, and I am giddy just to type this, with a bookcase. And your enemies can kill you with a bookcase in return! And that's just the magic part. That's just magic users.

There are deeper complexities, but they reveal themselves over time. Placement is important because you can flank enemies for a greater chance at damage. Placement is also important because if you line up with your allies you can create a wall, for extra protection. That second move, if you put both your action points into movement, will leave you exposed, so think about cover. Think about lines of sight and any area-attacks that enemies bring. One absolute beast I loathe to see shambling towards me on the battlefield brings a whole annulus of sorrow, staining tiles around them a burning red that does an itchy, low-level kind of grief. So think about target-prioritisation too.

Combat's thrilling and full of taxing moment-to-moment choices as you advance across the elbowy terrain. It may be paper, but there's a sense of crunch and impact that makes it feel real - or fantasy real, which is probably even better. And in that peculiar way specific to turn-based tactics games, it's all richly storyful, too. So many sudden rescues, shocking twists in your fortune dictated by nothing but hidden dice rolls and movement ranges. Oh, the things that happen out there in the papercraft dungeons and vales!

Survive battles and you get loot - new weapons, new armour and trinkets. And you level up. This means your party members get to pick from a range of new passive and active skills, randomly shuffled, almost all of them brilliant. Want to deal more damage as you lose health? No problem. Want a spell-caster to be able to summon roots that clutch as well as discuses of stone and shredded bark? You got it. My favourite is a perk that allows you to go into the Wildermyth equivalent of overwatch at the end of every turn, regardless of what you spent your action points on. Emboldening. It's my favourite today, anyway. Who knows about tomorrow.

These skills tie into the rest of the game, the game played between the battles. And this is where Wildermyth has properly got to me.

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Every weapon can be renamed, every enemy comes with flavour text that is genuinely flavourful.
Campaigns are divided up into chapters - three for a short campaign or five for a proper belter. There are a handful of authored campaigns to start you off and then you can clump together procedural stuff pretty much until the sun explodes. But here's the thing: even the authored campaigns are filled with procedural stuff. You can play them again and again and they will feel different.

They'll feel different because you create different characters for your party for one thing. Alongside a range of classes you also get the important stuff: bookishness? Greediness? Hotheadedness? I went into battle with a bookish hothead, and let me tell you, it was very different to heading out with a goofish romantic. Different because of the things they do along the way - the bookish hothead was always making up stories and falling out with people - but also different because it was a prompt for me to think about these felt-pen characters a bit differently. Honestly, I was shocked to fight through five chapters with Bode Elderquill, who I would personally have diagnosed as a brotherly dreamboat by the end of it all, to find out that he was in fact a cowardly greedwagon. In the gap between how I saw him and how the game saw him, he became writable, he started to truly live.

So yes, your party matters - as you plod through your adventure they will forge alliances, fall out, develop rivalries and fall in love. One generation gives way to the next, which has its own challenges, its own possibilities. But the story matters too, the big beats - let's find out what this mothman is up to! - along with procedural scrapes along the way.

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Such lovely writing: 'Tree trunks gather around like gawkers.' 'The forest bleeds to black.'

Take the mothman journey. It is a story about families, almost Shakespearian, but in between the big moments Wildermyth shuffles the paper and throws out mini-narratives. My main hitting-person guy heads into a dale and comes face-to-face with himself! A copy! Or is he the copy? A nice idea, but it's made brilliant with a choice: fight or flee, or talk? Come to understand the copy, if you risk it?

Another character spent a while trying to get a gem out of a wall or something only for it to explode and become embedded in their face. Another answered the call of the wolf god and became a wolf. These feel like spoilers, for which I apologise. But they won't be spoilers, really, because you may not see these things for hours as you play, and if you do encounter them, your characters will be different, the way you respond to things will be different.

What unites these stories is consequence and possibility: the chain of "buts" and "therefore" never ends. Like a good DM, Wildermyth understands that big choices should lead to an unexpected twist and more story, rather than the end of a story. Wildermyth flows.

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The music is stirring and romantic - sawing strings and medieval intrigue.

I'm still not done. The story unfolds as you move back and forth across a procedural map, scouting territories to find new combat encounters, or townships to fortify or turn into factories for the economy you need to level up your equipment. Time matters, because Wildermyth tells its stories in days and months and years as you travel from one area to another, or as you stop to build a path across a mountain or a bridge over a river. Your party matters because if you divide your forces to uncover more of the map you may end up creating weaknesses. The map matters - it's so dynamic. Enemy forces flock and multiply and stage incursions on your territory, just as the enemy unit types themselves may grow stronger or weaker depending on your actions in battle. This world, as Melville said, is a moving one. He wasn't talking about Wildermyth, but I reckon he'd have been up for a few games. The bookish romantic.

There is victory and sorrow here and genuine camaraderie as you learn more about your party, go through more with them, and inevitably - this itself is always a choice, rather beautifully - lose some in battle. I love the way Wildermyth embraces huge stretches of time, not just the time it takes to build a bridge - tricky if you have to complete a chapter before the summer's gone - but in the way that between chapters of the adventure you earn years of peace, and then you get to see what happens to your players during that peace. By the end of a yarn, you have been through things with these characters, and crucially they have changed. They're older. They've known love and loss. Granted, some of them are now wolves. Some of them even have pets!

Even this is not the end. My favourite screen in all of Wildermyth is the My Legacy screen. It's where the heroes you've taken through campaigns come to hang out afterwards - even the dead ones. You can take them back into new campaigns where new stories and new choices and new dangers awake. And you can look through their stats and their histories and see how much they've been through up until now. The skills and perks, sure, but also the campaigns they've been on. The relationships they've had. The things you now think of when you think about them. It never has to end. The leveling, the deepening, never has to end.

It's sort of like Mii Plaza, the My Legacy screen. And like the Miis, that carefully accommodating art style does a lot. Doesn't it? I look at Chass Hitch, my goofy romantic, my level 2 warrior, my 43-year-old heroic flirt, and I seem to see nuance in the black dots of his eyes, in the slow greying of his beard. He looks tired but optimistic. He has beaten crab-things and mechanical beasts. He met himself in the woods and did quite well out of it. At least I think it was the him-him I ended up with after that encounter. This art style, with its perfect MOR blandness, is ideal for projection - it's the place where the game and the player meets, to accommodate everything the character has done and everything they may do in the years to come. And that, ultimately, is Wildermyth.
 

azimuth

Educated
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Messages
82
I don't agree that the game's combat is shallow. There are a lot of cool builds and interactions between characters.

However, the coolest part of the game is the way each character takes on a strong unique roguelike flavour.
 

0wca

Learned
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Jan 27, 2021
Messages
300
Location
Not here
The game was pretty disappointing to me.

The combat is decent, the artstyle is OK, but the biggest gripe I have is the procedural storytelling. You're basically on rails for 70% of the time, as far as your choices are concerned and the game decides certain things on your behalf way to often. When you do get a choice to do something it's pretty superficial as I've intentionally made a new playthrough after completing the first campaign and selected many different choices in comparison to the first playthrough. I got many samey results with some small deviations and I think the C&C in this game is grossly overrated.

It's more of a fairytale storytelling than an actual RPG because player agency is secondary to crafting a fairytale story that the developers want to tell. The gear is also fairly limited only offering a few upgrades and then you're pretty much done gear wise.

There's nothing in this game that screams uniqueness and everything seems bland and similar including the C&C, the story itself and the fact that you can only be varying types of a goody-two-shoes guy, with very little room for anything else.

Shame, was hoping it would deliver more.
 
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