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Development Info Brennecke's Tale: Details on the genesis of Project Eternity

Infinitron

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Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Tags: Adam Brennecke; Obsidian Entertainment; Project Eternity

Project Eternity producer Adam Brennecke is a graduate of DigiPen, a prestigious game development school in Redmond, Washington. The school's website has put up an article about him that reveals, among other things, a bit about the game's early beginnings. Here's an excerpt:

“We were kind of joking even before Double Fine put out their Kickstarter that we should do a Kickstarter,” Brennecke says. “And so it was always on our mind.”​

With support from Obsidian co-founder Chris Avellone and game designer Josh Sawyer, Brennecke encouraged the company’s owners to consider starting their own crowd-funding campaign.​

“So they put me on the project, just by my lonesome self, to gather all the materials needed for the Kickstarter,” Brennecke says. “I had to pitch the project internally to the owners.”​

As part of a multi-day brainstorming process, Brennecke told meeting attendees to bring any game ideas to the table. Three out of the five participants came back with almost the exact same suggestion — to create a traditional fantasy RPG — and the project was green-lit. For the next several weeks, Brennecke worked with a handful of fellow developers to write, film, edit, and score the pitch video for their campaign. Brennecke also developed the various contribution levels and backer rewards.​

In just over 24 hours after launching their effort, Project Eternity reached its target of $1.1 million. The rest of the month-long campaign was a steady climb to become the most-funded computer game on Kickstarter.​

I wonder what those other two ideas were, and who suggested them.
 

Infinitron

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Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Yes, I would not be surprised if Josh Sawyer himself was one of those who came up with a different idea.

Although then again, if Project Eternity is really "Black Hound reborn" then maybe he did support the high fantasy idea.
 

Globbi

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Although then again, if Project Eternity is really "Black Hound reborn" then maybe he did support the high fantasy idea.
It might have been the "generic fantasy idea" first and then "let's make the Black Hound" after they already settled on the first general concept.
 

CappenVarra

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A parable, if you'll forgive me:

Gamist nonsense made me sad. I wanted to grapple with the issue, but the engine apparently doesn't support it. I wanted to bash my head against the door, but was told to invest in lockpicking instead. I picked my head for ideas, and found the solution at last: slam my head with an indestructible soul battery shaped like a book. It worked wonders, and now I want to punch Josh Sawyer even more than before.
 

Indranys

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The most interesting thing from that news is Adam Brennecke as a graduate from 'supposedly' :obviously: game development school.
What do you guys think about it?
Do you think joining a game development school will make the graduates better at designing games?
Do such schools really have a proven benefit or at least positive results for the industry?
Maybe as an primary source of labor for AAA projects/big studios?
Do such schools also teach art, code, write, sound effect and shits in addition to regular game design stuff?
Can they take the role as programmers, artists, writers etc. just like conventional graduates from their respective schools?
aren't they just inferior canon fodders compared to experienced game designers like Sawyer, Cain, and obviously Mr. Todd Howard?

Because I think it's just a waste of time and money.
AFAIK VD, Charles, Wolf Mittag, Dr. Dungeon etc. never have a formal game design education, but they prove themselves with their respective great games.

Because if I want to make a game, here's the thing I'll do:
I'll contract IT graduates to do the codes, writers to to help me with lores, stories, and quests, art school graduates to make the visual components of the game, and so on.
Regarding the game design, I can do it myself because I know what I want to make, the scope of the game. the rules I'll use, etc.
Yes it's just a small indie team and will be different than big professional studios. But still.

And Brenneck couldn't even play IE games properly for fuck's sake!
Please share me your infinite wisdom O Codex! :salute:
 

Infinitron

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Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
He's not a game designer and never has been. He started out as a programmer.
 
Self-Ejected

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game development school.

What do you guys think about it?

dzcZRF.gif
 

mikaelis

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Codex 2013 Codex 2014
Self-Ejected

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Game design is a p. useless degree. It's just a really watered down computer science, all it does is reduce your job options.
 

Indranys

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Game design is a p. useless degree. It's just a really watered down computer science, all it does is reduce your job options.

Yeah that's what I believe too.
That's why I need facts and confirmations regarding this issue.
 

80Maxwell08

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Huh I was actually thinking of asking this same question here. So I'm in college right now and they have a Game Design course (or whatever it's actually called). Should I actually go for that or just do something else like Computer Science (which I've seen mentioned several times on different forums)?
 

Indranys

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Huh I was actually thinking of asking this same question here. So I'm in college right now and they have a Game Design course (or whatever it's actually called). Should I actually go for that or just do something else like Computer Science (which I've seen mentioned several times on different forums)?

Game design for the answer to life, the universe and everything.
Computer science for fame, fortune, future, and women baldness.
:salute:
 

tuluse

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Serpent in the Staglands Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Shadorwun: Hong Kong
Huh I was actually thinking of asking this same question here. So I'm in college right now and they have a Game Design course (or whatever it's actually called). Should I actually go for that or just do something else like Computer Science (which I've seen mentioned several times on different forums)?
For a one off elective course? One class of CS isn't going to get you very far.

If you want to work on video games, you should find an aspect of it you are good at and focus on that. A game design class could be very instructive in helping you to figure out what it is you're good at.
 

80Maxwell08

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For a one off elective course? One class of CS isn't going to get you very far.

If you want to work on video games, you should find an aspect of it you are good at and focus on that. A game design class could be very instructive in helping you to figure out what it is you're good at.

Not one class a whole course. I think it's a degree plan but I honestly don't know a lot about how colleges work.
EDIT: I think the term I was looking for was "degree plan". Still no real idea.
 

tuluse

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Serpent in the Staglands Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Shadorwun: Hong Kong
CS is one of the most valuable degrees you can have. There are never enough programmers. However, not every one can do it (or would enjoy doing it). So it's really up to where your talents are.
 

80Maxwell08

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CS is one of the most valuable degrees you can have. There are never enough programmers. However, not every one can do it (or would enjoy doing it). So it's really up to where your talents are.

I'll keep this in mind. Thanks.
 

Oarfish

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CS is one of the most valuable degrees you can have. There are never enough programmers. However, not every one can do it (or would enjoy doing it). So it's really up to where your talents are.

CS (and related degrees) have the highest rate of graduate unemployment in the UK.
 

Indranys

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CS is one of the most valuable degrees you can have. There are never enough programmers. However, not every one can do it (or would enjoy doing it). So it's really up to where your talents are.

CS (and related degrees) have the highest rate of graduate unemployment in the UK.
:retarded: How come bro?
In my country that title will give you at least a decent job anytime anywhere like a pornstar prostitute!
 

Oarfish

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:retarded: How come bro?
In my country that title will give you at least a decent job anytime anywhere like a pornstar prostitute!

Not sure, there are silly amounts of money in development in the UK as well. At a guess it's because the universities have turned out people who can't code.
 

tuluse

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Serpent in the Staglands Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Shadorwun: Hong Kong
:retarded: How come bro?
In my country that title will give you at least a decent job anytime anywhere like a pornstar prostitute!

Not sure, there are silly amounts of money in development in the UK as well. At a guess it's because the universities have turned out people who can't code.
Allow me to modify my statement then.

A CS degree you're actually qualified for is very valuable.
 

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