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Vapourware Chronicles of Elyria

SmartCheetah

Arcane
Joined
May 7, 2013
Messages
1,085
Motherfucker was grabbing people money for a few years, never showing any serious progress (only some lore and early-before-alpha shit) and he decides to close the project like that. I feel sorry for all those poor suckers who poured money into this project. At first I was pretty hyped, but they went Star Shitizen way, trying to sell in-(not yet existing)game shit all over the place.
Sad fuck. Crowdfunding games like that is a huge mess, seriously. I hope people will learn from their mistakes.
NEVER PLEDGE YOUR MONEY FOR SOMEBODY'S IDEAS. Show the fucking barebones of the game or gtfo.

I wonder what community says. Is there a lot of drama already after that sad post ending with ground breaking news?

EDIT: Actually, there is a lot of drama, but most people seem to realize what sort of shitshow that was.
 
Last edited:

Virgil Brummond

Educated
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Messages
69
Since Jeromy Walsh posted his "State of Elyria: Into the Abyss" blogpost about the cancellation of Chronicle of Elyria, there have been quite a lot of new developments.

Once Walsh heard that the Kickstarter backers decided to file a lawsuit against Soulbound Studios, he did a 180 and claimed that he never actually meant to shut down the project and work would continue:

On March 24th I posted a “State of Elyria” update for our game, Chronicles of Elyria, to our blog. In that post, I informed our community that, due to the under-performance of our recent Settlers of Elyria event and the economic impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic, I had made the hard decision to lay off staff and suspend development. However, it was my aim to leave the blog post with a message of hope that we could find a way to secure additional funding, honor your pledge package rewards, and deliver the game we promised.
...
It was never my intent to permanently end the development of the game, disregard your contributions, or fail to deliver what we promised.

Back in September 2016, Walsh promised to release an audit of his business activities if he failed to deliver. Although it is suspicious that he explicitly references balance sheets and not a full audit. A balance sheet refers to the financial position of company in a specific point in time and does not actually provide historical expenditure information.

Finally, 'No refund' brings with it a stigma of additional risk. But of course, we'll do just as our competitors are doing. In the event that Soulbound Studios is, for some reason, unable to complete development due to a lack of resources, we'll make available our balance sheet so backers can see how the money was spent.

Walsh would go on to claim that he did run an independent audit, but he wasn't able to share the result because of the lawsuit:

Our FAQ was recently updated to cover some of these points, but to address it as much as I’m able, sadly we aren’t in a position to share the forensic audit of our studio. I think at the heart of your question, our backers want to know that the funds they contributed to development were appropriately spent - I totally get that - and all I can say on the subject is that an independent external auditor evaluated Soulbound Studio’s accounts and was entirely satisfied with our companies statements, expenditure and recorded use of funds.

Walsh allegedly decided to switch his effort to the development of "Kingdoms of Elyria", a multiplayer town-builder in the vein of Banished or more closely the multiplayer version of Kingdoms Reborn.

A few videos were released of the work in progress version of KoE, it doesn't seem like he put in any effort:



Over the past ~2 years, Walsh has continued to post blogposts on alleged progress and even released some roadmaps, but he never did deliver anything meaningful.

Towards the end of 2022, the lawsuit against Soulbound Studios was dismissed by US courts. Walsh made some interesting comments on the dismissal:

Last week, the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington dismissed the class action lawsuit which was filed against Soulbound Studios. As a matter of law.

(Sidebar: I considered ending that sentence with an exclamation mark, emojis, and even an excited expletive. But the fact is, there's no punctuation or emoji that adequately conveys how relieved I am by this decision. So, I just went with the classic, informational period.
...
The court decision to dismiss the lawsuit comes as a victory to both all those who have, or will use crowdfunding as a source of seed funding for innovative projects, as well as (and most importantly) the backers of Chronicles of Elyria.
...

With respect to our backers, now that the legal matters are behind us, and the costs finally capped, we can at last, after two years, put 100% of our attention back on the business of making games. And that's exactly what we're going to do!

Walsh never did release the results of the audit that allegedly should no sign of improper behaviour.

Back to the present. Just last week, Walsh released a new blogpost that can be best described as an attempt to position himself as a misunderstood innovator going through the trials of failure. It is worth reading in full if you have time. Some highlights below:

Walsh goes through a massive list of business self help books that he's been reading:

Over the past few years, I have dedicated considerable time to learning. This education came from reading books and reflecting on my choices and experiences from 2016 to the present. The latter was particularly impactful, as I could apply the knowledge gained from my reading to my personal experiences.
...
After reading both the "Obstacle is the Way" and picking up "The Daily Stoic," I was looking up additional quotes on stoicism when, arbitrarily, I encountered another quote that's often incorrectly attributed to Mark Twain:

"The person who does not read has no advantage over the person who cannot read."
...
I began reading as voraciously as I could. Generally speaking, a couple of books a month. Some of my favorites in 2020 were Start with Why, by Simon Sinek, The Hard Thing About Hard Things, by Ben Horowitz, and The Four Disciplines of Execution, by Sean Covey et al.

The first one is because Simon Sinek is a contagious optimist. In reading Start With Why I was inspired to understand what about CoE made people love it.
...
I once again found it hard to move forward, so I returned to my reading. In 2021, three of the better books I read were:
  • Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, Greg McKeown
  • Losing My Virginity, Richard Branson
  • Meditations, Marcus Aurelius

The post includes a lot of musing about Walsh's "experience" as a C-Suite Executive/innovator:

The second, "Losing My Virginity," was a book I started reading as part of a book club I'd joined with other executives.
...
There were fewer nuggets of useful insight from that one and more just a glimpse at the challenges and struggles other CEOs face - including legal struggles and disagreements. Oddly, this helped make my situation seem more palatable. Not that I recommend anyone get sued, but after reading Branson's book, it almost felt like a right of passage.
...
The first book is from Tony Fadell, another CEO who had his share of failures until he eventually developed the iPod, iPhone, and the Nest. Three groundbreaking, innovative products that came only after years of trial and error and multiple failures.
...
But, as I quickly discovered, being a CEO is a full-time job between HR, accounting, PR ...

He blames some of his employees for CoE's failure:

I spent much of my time preparing for development rather than developing, leaving my junior programmer with far too much responsibility. Don't get me wrong. He was smart, talented, and even a former student of mine. But he was still a junior, and I didn't give him the support and oversight that he deserved to grow as an engineer.
...
I made several new leadership mistakes. Because I'd never been a Director before, only a Lead, I still needed to learn how to manage a Lead properly. I overstepped on some occasions and under stepped on others. Ultimately, I allowed the development of the Soulborn Engine to be moved to Node.js/TypeScript against my better judgment. Put briefly, to give my Lead breathing room to do their job and show I trusted them, I abdicated to them instead of delegated to them

Claims that development is going smoother with one (nominal employee) than with a team of ~20:

Given all of that, when in late 2022/early 2023, I found myself the only developer at Soulbound Studios, I decided to lean into my strengths. Stepping back into the Principal Engineering role, I'm in a really good place, and development is finally moving ahead at the speed and in the way I needed it to all along.

The whole thing reads like some sort of parody of silicion valley techbro types.
 

Leinhart

Literate
Joined
Jun 26, 2023
Messages
44
Location
Barranquilla - Colombia
Since Jeromy Walsh posted his "State of Elyria: Into the Abyss" blogpost about the cancellation of Chronicle of Elyria, there have been quite a lot of new developments.

Once Walsh heard that the Kickstarter backers decided to file a lawsuit against Soulbound Studios, he did a 180 and claimed that he never actually meant to shut down the project and work would continue:

On March 24th I posted a “State of Elyria” update for our game, Chronicles of Elyria, to our blog. In that post, I informed our community that, due to the under-performance of our recent Settlers of Elyria event and the economic impact of the global COVID-19 pandemic, I had made the hard decision to lay off staff and suspend development. However, it was my aim to leave the blog post with a message of hope that we could find a way to secure additional funding, honor your pledge package rewards, and deliver the game we promised.
...
It was never my intent to permanently end the development of the game, disregard your contributions, or fail to deliver what we promised.

Back in September 2016, Walsh promised to release an audit of his business activities if he failed to deliver. Although it is suspicious that he explicitly references balance sheets and not a full audit. A balance sheet refers to the financial position of company in a specific point in time and does not actually provide historical expenditure information.

Finally, 'No refund' brings with it a stigma of additional risk. But of course, we'll do just as our competitors are doing. In the event that Soulbound Studios is, for some reason, unable to complete development due to a lack of resources, we'll make available our balance sheet so backers can see how the money was spent.

Walsh would go on to claim that he did run an independent audit, but he wasn't able to share the result because of the lawsuit:

Our FAQ was recently updated to cover some of these points, but to address it as much as I’m able, sadly we aren’t in a position to share the forensic audit of our studio. I think at the heart of your question, our backers want to know that the funds they contributed to development were appropriately spent - I totally get that - and all I can say on the subject is that an independent external auditor evaluated Soulbound Studio’s accounts and was entirely satisfied with our companies statements, expenditure and recorded use of funds.

Walsh allegedly decided to switch his effort to the development of "Kingdoms of Elyria", a multiplayer town-builder in the vein of Banished or more closely the multiplayer version of Kingdoms Reborn.

A few videos were released of the work in progress version of KoE, it doesn't seem like he put in any effort:



Over the past ~2 years, Walsh has continued to post blogposts on alleged progress and even released some roadmaps, but he never did deliver anything meaningful.

Towards the end of 2022, the lawsuit against Soulbound Studios was dismissed by US courts. Walsh made some interesting comments on the dismissal:

Last week, the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington dismissed the class action lawsuit which was filed against Soulbound Studios. As a matter of law.

(Sidebar: I considered ending that sentence with an exclamation mark, emojis, and even an excited expletive. But the fact is, there's no punctuation or emoji that adequately conveys how relieved I am by this decision. So, I just went with the classic, informational period.
...
The court decision to dismiss the lawsuit comes as a victory to both all those who have, or will use crowdfunding as a source of seed funding for innovative projects, as well as (and most importantly) the backers of Chronicles of Elyria.
...

With respect to our backers, now that the legal matters are behind us, and the costs finally capped, we can at last, after two years, put 100% of our attention back on the business of making games. And that's exactly what we're going to do!

Walsh never did release the results of the audit that allegedly should no sign of improper behaviour.

Back to the present. Just last week, Walsh released a new blogpost that can be best described as an attempt to position himself as a misunderstood innovator going through the trials of failure. It is worth reading in full if you have time. Some highlights below:

Walsh goes through a massive list of business self help books that he's been reading:

Over the past few years, I have dedicated considerable time to learning. This education came from reading books and reflecting on my choices and experiences from 2016 to the present. The latter was particularly impactful, as I could apply the knowledge gained from my reading to my personal experiences.
...
After reading both the "Obstacle is the Way" and picking up "The Daily Stoic," I was looking up additional quotes on stoicism when, arbitrarily, I encountered another quote that's often incorrectly attributed to Mark Twain:

"The person who does not read has no advantage over the person who cannot read."
...
I began reading as voraciously as I could. Generally speaking, a couple of books a month. Some of my favorites in 2020 were Start with Why, by Simon Sinek, The Hard Thing About Hard Things, by Ben Horowitz, and The Four Disciplines of Execution, by Sean Covey et al.

The first one is because Simon Sinek is a contagious optimist. In reading Start With Why I was inspired to understand what about CoE made people love it.
...
I once again found it hard to move forward, so I returned to my reading. In 2021, three of the better books I read were:
  • Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, Greg McKeown
  • Losing My Virginity, Richard Branson
  • Meditations, Marcus Aurelius

The post includes a lot of musing about Walsh's "experience" as a C-Suite Executive/innovator:

The second, "Losing My Virginity," was a book I started reading as part of a book club I'd joined with other executives.
...
There were fewer nuggets of useful insight from that one and more just a glimpse at the challenges and struggles other CEOs face - including legal struggles and disagreements. Oddly, this helped make my situation seem more palatable. Not that I recommend anyone get sued, but after reading Branson's book, it almost felt like a right of passage.
...
The first book is from Tony Fadell, another CEO who had his share of failures until he eventually developed the iPod, iPhone, and the Nest. Three groundbreaking, innovative products that came only after years of trial and error and multiple failures.
...
But, as I quickly discovered, being a CEO is a full-time job between HR, accounting, PR ...

He blames some of his employees for CoE's failure:

I spent much of my time preparing for development rather than developing, leaving my junior programmer with far too much responsibility. Don't get me wrong. He was smart, talented, and even a former student of mine. But he was still a junior, and I didn't give him the support and oversight that he deserved to grow as an engineer.
...
I made several new leadership mistakes. Because I'd never been a Director before, only a Lead, I still needed to learn how to manage a Lead properly. I overstepped on some occasions and under stepped on others. Ultimately, I allowed the development of the Soulborn Engine to be moved to Node.js/TypeScript against my better judgment. Put briefly, to give my Lead breathing room to do their job and show I trusted them, I abdicated to them instead of delegated to them

Claims that development is going smoother with one (nominal employee) than with a team of ~20:

Given all of that, when in late 2022/early 2023, I found myself the only developer at Soulbound Studios, I decided to lean into my strengths. Stepping back into the Principal Engineering role, I'm in a really good place, and development is finally moving ahead at the speed and in the way I needed it to all along.

The whole thing reads like some sort of parody of silicion valley techbro types.

This was a very funny read. Thank you.

How can people go through the same cycle with every single "kickstarter" and not realize how dumb it is.

Hype > Take your money > Fuck up.

Waiting for full released game is the safest path for your wallet and hearth safety.
 

Virgil Brummond

Educated
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Messages
69
The Show Must Go On: Jeremy Walsh (aka Caspian) has a PSA: The Soulborn Engine is officially an MMO engine again!

NGCZIqAI_o.jpg


It only took 7+ years:

yW0g3hDZ_o.jpg
 

Myobi

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 26, 2016
Messages
1,432
I need to start a Kickstarter for a whatevertheshitMMO as well, I want free money too.
 

Virgil Brummond

Educated
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Messages
69
Jeromy Walsh decided to at last release his "balance sheet", three years after he announced the closure of his studio.

https://chroniclesofelyria.com/blog/35086/Dev-Journal-July-2023

F9HK5YjV_o.png


Overall, nothing too exciting about this breakdown, but it does suggest that Walsh's studio was constantly on the edge of running out of money every year.

Walsh also goes on to act all surprised about the cost of employee salaries, payroll taxes and (US) healthcare charges which he labels as "hidden costs".

Employment Taxes: This includes all the federal withholdings paid to the IRS, such as withheld income taxes, social security, and Medicare. Employment Taxes is one of those often overlooked hidden costs.

Who could have thought that there are cost involved beyond the net pay that goes to employees?

Walsh claims to have earned 96K per year on a net basis:

While I'm on this section, I wanted to quickly point out that, of the roughly $3.5 million paid to employees in salary, exactly $288,807.59 of that was paid to me from 2017 through 2019 as my salary. To save you the math, that's an average of $96,260.20 per year - less than I took home as a software engineer.

Seems relatively average for a high cost of living region of the US.

But then Walsh did also receive payments via "Owner Distribution":

Owner Distributions: This one is perhaps the most difficult to explain, yet, it is still the sixth most expensive item on the list.

...

For example, suppose you're the sole owner of a hypothetical S-Corp that generates $10 million in taxable income for the year, but your "salary" is only $100k. In that case, you're still responsible for paying household income taxes as though your family earned the total amount.

...

As a result, it's common for LLCs and S-Corps to pay their members/shareholders distributions to help cover the costs of income taxes they owe.

...

As you can see, I withdrew, on average, about $75k per year, which was sent to the IRS. More specifically, I removed $233.5k from 2017 to 2019.

I don't doubt that the "Owner Distribution" money went to the US tax authorities, but I am somewhat skeptical that the annual revenue of his "S-Corp" was taxed as if it was his full income. This doesn't really make sense. If he was earning roughly $2,281 K per year via his S-Corp, only needed to pay $75 K in incomes taxes? That's a 3.3% income tax rate. Even ignoring tax bracket impact and exemptions, this seems low. But perhaps I am ignorant about various US tax schemes.

The "Lessons Learned" section is where thing start getting really interesting.

Crowdfunding Policies & Legislation
Rewards-based crowdfunding is still a relatively new way of raising capital, and the policies and legislation around it are still in flux. Different state and federal organizations view rewards-based crowdfunding differently - generally, whichever way is least favorable to you. For example, the IRS considers it income, not investment. So despite the need to use it for ongoing product development, you'll give the IRS a non-trivial amount

What exactly are you investing in when you drop some money on Kickstarter or in a pre-release cash shop?

Payroll Taxes & Medical Insurance
Salaries are expensive, but there are hidden costs associated with employment. In particular, payroll taxes and medical insurance. As you'll see below, the average cost per employee per year is about 45% higher than their base salary. The most significant contribution comes from Employment Taxes and Health Insurance premiums. Be prepared for that.

There is no way Walsh wrote this with a straight face.

Contractual vs. Residual Capital
....
In contrast, with residual income such as crowdfunding, the amount of money you'll bring in next month, next quarter, or even next year is highly variable. It is vulnerable to community and public sentiment, the economy, and catastrophic events like global pandemics.

Right, when you don't have a product to sell, you are dependent on crowdfunding cash. Interesting insight.

The Cost of Not Hiring
...

But, in 2019, I joined an advisory board to become a better CEO and leader. At one point, I met with the chair to get advice on what to do in this circumstance. I told the chair that I'd had difficulty finding programmers, so I'd specifically hired designers who could act as "Technical Designers" and do some of the work a programmer could do. Should I continue relying on them since they have the skills, or hire more programmers? The chair had me estimate the percentage of time the technical designers did things a programmer could do.

He then pointed out that I was still "paying" for the programmers anyways. It was just being paid to the designers instead. People who were objectively less effective at the role and were spending their time doing that instead of designing. That was slowing down development and increasing the number of months needed to complete the project. He reminded me that each month spent on the project was a month spent paying for everyone in the studio, not just the additional programmer.

Since releasing this blogpost, Walsh has continued to post random devblog that imply that he is taking on and overcoming major technological challenges, but as usual, there is no real roadmap to release.

In his last blog, Walsh did promise a surprise:

Finally, in the spirit of taking some risks in the interest of our mission statement, I've got some surprises in store for all of you that will be announced in the October Development Update.
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
Messages
2,010
Jeromy Walsh decided to at last release his "balance sheet", three years after he announced the closure of his studio.

https://chroniclesofelyria.com/blog/35086/Dev-Journal-July-2023

F9HK5YjV_o.png


Overall, nothing too exciting about this breakdown, but it does suggest that Walsh's studio was constantly on the edge of running out of money every year.

Walsh also goes on to act all surprised about the cost of employee salaries, payroll taxes and (US) healthcare charges which he labels as "hidden costs".

Employment Taxes: This includes all the federal withholdings paid to the IRS, such as withheld income taxes, social security, and Medicare. Employment Taxes is one of those often overlooked hidden costs.

Who could have thought that there are cost involved beyond the net pay that goes to employees?

Walsh claims to have earned 96K per year on a net basis:

While I'm on this section, I wanted to quickly point out that, of the roughly $3.5 million paid to employees in salary, exactly $288,807.59 of that was paid to me from 2017 through 2019 as my salary. To save you the math, that's an average of $96,260.20 per year - less than I took home as a software engineer.

Seems relatively average for a high cost of living region of the US.

But then Walsh did also receive payments via "Owner Distribution":

Owner Distributions: This one is perhaps the most difficult to explain, yet, it is still the sixth most expensive item on the list.

...

For example, suppose you're the sole owner of a hypothetical S-Corp that generates $10 million in taxable income for the year, but your "salary" is only $100k. In that case, you're still responsible for paying household income taxes as though your family earned the total amount.

...

As a result, it's common for LLCs and S-Corps to pay their members/shareholders distributions to help cover the costs of income taxes they owe.

...

As you can see, I withdrew, on average, about $75k per year, which was sent to the IRS. More specifically, I removed $233.5k from 2017 to 2019.

I don't doubt that the "Owner Distribution" money went to the US tax authorities, but I am somewhat skeptical that the annual revenue of his "S-Corp" was taxed as if it was his full income. This doesn't really make sense. If he was earning roughly $2,281 K per year via his S-Corp, only needed to pay $75 K in incomes taxes? That's a 3.3% income tax rate. Even ignoring tax bracket impact and exemptions, this seems low. But perhaps I am ignorant about various US tax schemes.

The "Lessons Learned" section is where thing start getting really interesting.

Crowdfunding Policies & Legislation
Rewards-based crowdfunding is still a relatively new way of raising capital, and the policies and legislation around it are still in flux. Different state and federal organizations view rewards-based crowdfunding differently - generally, whichever way is least favorable to you. For example, the IRS considers it income, not investment. So despite the need to use it for ongoing product development, you'll give the IRS a non-trivial amount

What exactly are you investing in when you drop some money on Kickstarter or in a pre-release cash shop?

Payroll Taxes & Medical Insurance
Salaries are expensive, but there are hidden costs associated with employment. In particular, payroll taxes and medical insurance. As you'll see below, the average cost per employee per year is about 45% higher than their base salary. The most significant contribution comes from Employment Taxes and Health Insurance premiums. Be prepared for that.

There is no way Walsh wrote this with a straight face.

Contractual vs. Residual Capital
....
In contrast, with residual income such as crowdfunding, the amount of money you'll bring in next month, next quarter, or even next year is highly variable. It is vulnerable to community and public sentiment, the economy, and catastrophic events like global pandemics.

Right, when you don't have a product to sell, you are dependent on crowdfunding cash. Interesting insight.

The Cost of Not Hiring
...

But, in 2019, I joined an advisory board to become a better CEO and leader. At one point, I met with the chair to get advice on what to do in this circumstance. I told the chair that I'd had difficulty finding programmers, so I'd specifically hired designers who could act as "Technical Designers" and do some of the work a programmer could do. Should I continue relying on them since they have the skills, or hire more programmers? The chair had me estimate the percentage of time the technical designers did things a programmer could do.

He then pointed out that I was still "paying" for the programmers anyways. It was just being paid to the designers instead. People who were objectively less effective at the role and were spending their time doing that instead of designing. That was slowing down development and increasing the number of months needed to complete the project. He reminded me that each month spent on the project was a month spent paying for everyone in the studio, not just the additional programmer.

Since releasing this blogpost, Walsh has continued to post random devblog that imply that he is taking on and overcoming major technological challenges, but as usual, there is no real roadmap to release.

In his last blog, Walsh did promise a surprise:

Finally, in the spirit of taking some risks in the interest of our mission statement, I've got some surprises in store for all of you that will be announced in the October Development Update.
You have to give it to the guy though, $3m scam, not bad. I doubt I could ever pull that off.
 

Mise

Not The Best Games
Developer
Joined
Feb 6, 2020
Messages
79
500 dollars on furniture on a couple milion dollar project? That's how you know it's a scam.
 

Virgil Brummond

Educated
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Messages
69
15K on PC hardware for ~20 people also seems not optimal.

Walsh is now using those desktops as ad-hoc servers to test his new backend (helps him save on CSP costs):

PuKvVSsu_o.jpg
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
Messages
2,010
15K on PC hardware for ~20 people also seems not optimal.

Walsh is now using those desktops as ad-hoc servers to test his new backend (helps him save on CSP costs):

PuKvVSsu_o.jpg
So how many years later and he is still tinkering with RnD about how to setup a server cluster?
 

mediocrepoet

Philosoraptor in Residence
Patron
Joined
Sep 30, 2009
Messages
12,678
Location
Combatfag: Gold box / Pathfinder
Codex 2012 Codex+ Now Streaming! MCA Project: Eternity Divinity: Original Sin 2
"Owner distribution" before even developing anything? Lol bullshit, what an asshole.

Anyone actually building a business who isn't an idiot won't take distributions until after you have a product that's starting to sell and generate net income. Hell, many don't even take a full salary, if any, just to get things off the ground.

I'm just surprised he's brazen enough to put that out there.
 

Virgil Brummond

Educated
Joined
Jan 23, 2023
Messages
69
Back in early 2023, Walsh claimed that he would release Kingdoms of Elyria, his colony builder side project, by the end of 2023:

That's it for this Q4 State of Elyria update. While we ended 2022 in a rut, we are beginning 2023 with a surge of new energy, a return to more frequent updates and forward progress, and a plan for how we are going to get from where we are now, to where we want to be at the end of 2023.

The most important thing I want people to take away from this is that while 2022 sucked, I won't let us be defined by it. It has prepared us for 2023, which is starting strong, and we will be shipping Kingdoms of Elyria: Settlements this year.

This of course didn't happen. MassivelyOP reports on a blog post by Walsh from Sept. 2023:

“While pushing for a release this year was already looking unlikely, I have come to recognize that rushing the launch wouldn’t be in the best interest of the players or the studio,” Walsh said in a new dev blog, citing Baldur’s Gate 3 as an inspiration for the delay (something to do with polish).

While Walsh showed no progress on KoE, he did organize a series of multi-hour Q&A sessions with fans.

These went as well as you can imagine. In Walsh's defense he was relatively open with fans. KiraTV, a long time "follower" of Walsh/CoE drama, covered the first Q&A session in the series of commentary videos (Parts I, II, III).

There isn't all too much new information. Walsh continues to blame his employees and even partners. He does comment on "Lies Of Delyria", a 1 week re-imagining of Kingdoms of Elyria by an aspiring indie dev:



I will emphasize this question/statement by a lady that doesn't sugar coat anything:



Select quote: "From the beginning of Chronicles of Elyria, until now, you have not met a deadline ... that kind of stings, he doesn't give a shit ...". It's worth checking out their whole convo.

In the second Q&A session in early December, Walsh brings up some other side projects.

He seems to have pivoted back to ElyriaMUD, below is a screenshot of this project from a few years ago (it was never publicly released I believe):

IE80yFjC_o.png


However, this time Walsh claims that ElyriaMUD is dependent on ElyriaChat being ready.

ElyriaChat seems to be some sort of RP chat application.

One of Walsh's few remaining fans comments on ElyriaChat:

Elyria Chat is an in-character roleplay chat system that is used in CoE. So you can rp as your character as it would function within the game. Some people want it and keep asking for it, and Caspian has said it is 95% there already, so he might as well do it. *shrugs*

Since the beginning of 2024, we haven't heard anything about ElyriaMUD or ElyriaChat. We did see Walsh calling for alpha testing of a feedback form:

uJe9UJox_o.png


The questions were pretty cautious, but it was interesting to see that most respondents didn't care much about KoE and showed most interest in the original Chronicle of Elyria:

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Not much interest in ElyriaMUD. :P
 

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