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Review IGN reviews Divine Divinity

Saint_Proverbius

Administrator
Staff Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2002
Messages
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Tags: Divine Divinity

<A href="http://pc.ign.com/">PC.IGN</a> has posted up their <A href="http://pc.ign.com/articles/376/376019p1.html">review</a> of <A href="http://www.larian.com/Site/english/divinity/divinity.html">Divine Divinity</a>. The review is very, very postive and gives the game an <b>8.5/10</b>, making the comparason to <b>Ultima VII</b>, as you can see:
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<blockquote>Do you remember that 1992 hit, Ultima VII? It hasn't been seen much since then, because the developers, Origin Systems, used a proprietary form of memory management that conflicts with Windows. But what blew most of us away at the time weren't the great graphics or multiple person parties, but the fact that for the first time we could actually walk through a world that moved and regulated itself despite our presence: a world containing its own weather, day and night cycles, merchants who closed up shop at the end of business and went home, and thousands of items that existed as separate objects?including rakes, baskets, dinner plates and desk stamps. Nothing 2D has approached it since (except for Ultima VII, part 2), but Divine Divinity comes closest.</blockquote>
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It's good to see a CRPG that tries to provide interactive depth with objects once again.
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Spotted this at <A href="http://www.rpgdot.com">RPGDot</a>.
 

Sheriff_Fatman

Liturgist
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
120
The objects thing works well, I thought. I was very pleasantly suprised when I unstacked a pile of crates and found a door behind it. Compared to rolling a 5-6 on a d6, it was a lot more fun :)
 

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