Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

Infusion Dev Log #7: New Armor Mechanics

Styg

Stygian Software
Developer
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
743
Location
Serbia
Hi guys,

It's that time of the year again. All the stars and planets are in the right position and it's time for an Infusion dev log.

We already showed you the extent to which we upgraded the visual aspects of the engine, but the mechanical changes that I've done so far and am yet to do are just as extensive, and perhaps more radical. I'm going to talk about them one by one, in separate dev logs, as I continue to test, tweak, and refine them.

Our immediate goal with the engine and the game is to (re-)implement a number of items and mechanics, get a few areas together, and get the game in a state where it can be played for real, so to speak. Mainly so I can better asses how all these changes work in practice, but also so we can produce a short demo video and show you the game in action for the first time.



* * * * * * * * * *


So, anyway, let's get to the changes to the armor mechanics and damage resistance in general.

In Underrail, the damage resistance was divided into percentual resistance and flat threshold. Incoming damage would be reduced either percentually or by flat amount, whichever would reduce more damage in any given case. This caused a lot of balancing problems. Threshold was generally either useless or overpowered (especially when stacked in early game), while resistance was hard to progress with armor quality, as its percentual nature made it already scale innately.

All these problems really came to forefront when I was implementing different types of shotgun shells in Expedition. Balancing usefulness of different shells in this system was just impossible and it took a lot of tweaking to make it even remotely decent with liberal use of seemingly arbitrary threshold and resistance ignore factors. At one point I was tempted to just implement a completely different interaction for the shells specifically, but decided against it for the sake of consistency.

Another problem with the old model was that all resistances stacked globally. Meaning: resistances from boots and helmets were equally effective as body armor and they all aggregated when it came to interacting with incoming damage. This made me really hesitant to put a lot of resistances on helmets and boots because, on one hand, I didn't want them to make the high resistance armors completely broken by just maxing (or near maxing) out all the resistances and, on the other hand, I didn't want these items, because of their high resistances, becoming mandatory for characters that use ligher armor in the body slot.

There are other problems too, but these are the main issues, I think.



So how does the Infusion's new system differ from the old one?






In Infusion we're going to have a lot more gear slots, mainly from separating body armor and helmets into multiple component slots. This will provide the player with a lot more damage resistance sources. But unlike in the old system, these resistances will not stack. Instead, they will all interact with any given attack separately. So whenever you're struck somewhere on the body, the game will check what armor covers that spot, and it will interact with that armor piece. If there are multiple pieces, it will go through each of them separately, from the outer toward the inner. E.g. you might have some minor resistances on the overcoat that will interact with an incoming bullet or a stab before your torso armor.

For now, I have no intention to allow the player to choose which part of the target's body they're attacking (Fallout style), but there will be different special attacks / stances that will influence this (e.g. decapitate). Also, elevation and size of attacker and the target will also play a role here. So, for example, attacking someone from an elevated position will give you a better chance to hit them in the head and worse (if any) chance to hit their feet.

Different types of creatures will have different body part arrangements. For humans it is as follows: Head (5%), Torso (55%), Arms (10%), Legs (including the pelvis) (25%), Feet (5%). The number in brackets is the current working chance to hit distribution for a generic ranged attack. These numbers will vary for different attacks and situations, but it should give you some general idea what areas are going to be most important to cover with armor in most situations.





Depending on the armor design itself, it may end up covering one or more body parts. In the example of an armored rig/vest, which is the only crafted armor at the moment that's implemented, in addition to covering the torso, it can also provide some additional protection to arms and legs.



Let's go through the examples above. The armor on the left only provides cover to 80% of the torso part. Like the icon indicates, it does not cover the stomach all the way down. We'll talk about the intricacies of coverage later.

The armor in the middle, however, also sports sleeves and a groin guard. The groin guard covers the rest of the belly in the torso part and also covers the groin area, of course, which falls under the legs part. The sleeves cover the shoulders area of the arms part.

The armor on the right has sleeves, but no groin guard.

Regarding coverage, the way we're going to determine at which point an attack lands in a given body part, and so if it interacts with an armor segment that provides partial coverage, is still under consideration. The tooltip here provides just the coverage percentage, but the icon itself is trying to further illustrate what area of the part is covered. Having 20% coverage in arms at the top (shoulders) is not the same as at the bottom (hands) as both of these can be layered over. It doesn't make much sense that, if you are wearing gloves and shoulder pads, a bullet attack can go through both of these.

The way I treat the coverage number, which is esentially a floating point pair (e.g. 0.8-1.0 for shoulders, 0.0-0.2 for hands), is that 0 is the lowest point of the body part and 1 is the top point of the body part and 0.5 is the middle.



* * * * * * * * * *


Now, if you are an RPG mechanics connoisseur, as you surely must be if you made it this far into the dev log, you might be looking at that armor at the left and thinking how fun it's going to be to get hit by stray bullet to the torso right below your endgame crafting-maxxed armored vest and instakilled 20 hours into your ironman DOMINATING run. And I share your enthusiasm for suffering. However, as this kind of experience might not be pleasurable for most players, there are some additional considerations that I'm going to have to give to this.

One of the mechanics that are in place right now is that there is such a thing as grazing shots, which are basically hits that deal about half as much damage. They occur when the attack roll is within the graze part of the hit chance, the size of which is determined by attack-to-defense ratio. I don't want to get into too much details regarding this right now, as the topic is extensive and this dev log is already too long (it warrants its own). What is relevant for the example above is that the farther you are into the graze area of the roll, the farther the hit lands from the center of the body part.

So, basically, the lethal bullet hit described above would deal half the damage, giving you a better chance to survive. Whether this will be enough to make these situations acceptable, remains to be seen through testing. Just know that I am aware of this potential problem with the system.

So what about other body parts? Are we going to have to cover every bit of our body with heavy armor to avoid the similar scenario? What about getting hit with a plasma gun critical to the pinky toe while wearing tabis? Well, first of all, the chance to get hit in the feet is quite low, outside insects biting you or stepping on caltrops or acid.

Additionally, each body part has its innate damage taken modifier and they are currently set to these values: head - 150%, torso - 100%, arms - 40%, legs - 60%, feet - 25%. So the armor value of your footwear is not nearly as important as your body armor, while if you don't wear a helmet to a gun fight, you're taking quite a risk.

All these numbers are subject to change, of course.



* * * * * * * * * *


The last point I want to cover are the armor values themselves. As you might have noticed, the old format of percentage resistance / flat threshold is gone. What we have now is resistance / soak / material type.

Firstly, ignore these particular numbers, they are just random placeholders. I haven't gotten to writing real component specs yet. That said, let's go through all these values.

Resistance is the first line of defense, so to speak. It is checked against the incoming damage in order to determine what percentage of it will go through the armor. The formula goes something like this (there's also armor penetration, armor bypass and other mods, but for simplicity's sake, we're going to ignore those for now):

damage_done = incoming_damage * (incoming_damage / (incoming_damage + resistance))2



So if the resistance and damage values are the same, the incoming damage is multiplied by 0.25. That is, quarter of it goes through. If the incoming damage is twice the resistance, it's multiplied by 0.43, and for the other way around it's 0.1.

This formula is subject to change, of course, pending testing. But the general idea is that the ratio between damage and resistance is what determines the percentage reduction instead of it being fixed on the item. This makes the resistance much easier to scale/progress.



After the formula above is applied, soak value is deducted:

final_damage_done = damage_done - soak



So, unlike threshold, soak will now be an important stat throughout the playthrough as it is always applied at the very end, reducing already percentually reduced value.

The final property of damage resistance is the material type. I haven't started implementing this yet, but the idea is that this will modify the inputs to the formulas above, and maybe even formula itself, depending on the type of the attack and the type of material. For example, kevlar is going to be really good against bullet attacks, but not that good against other attacks.



* * * * * * * * * *


That's it for now. There are a lot more mechanical changes that are either implemented or are being implemented, so expect more dev logs in the near future. But then again, I always say that and then skip nearly a whole year without posting.

Also, follow me on Twitter, where I post smaller tidbits occasionally.



Cheers.
 

std::namespace

Guest
> shells too hard to balance
> lets make armor even more complex and more random, thats surely gonna make it easier and better!
> roffles!1

This makes the resistance much easier to scale/progress.
its (that particular non linearity here) also make it behave in the same binary way as DT, imho actually worse, you either have it very low and eat most/all damage or have to pull it into absurd territory
gee, it reminds me of something else - oh yeah! evasion in underrail, roffles!

ive just seen in colony ship what separate arm/leg/body armor does -> no thx!
 

agris

Arcane
Patron
Joined
Apr 16, 2004
Messages
6,874
Styg why have feet separate from legs, but hands not separate from arms? I imagine you have specific debuffs in mind for all the listed areas, and I think there's a flavor of hand-specific debuffs that are thematic and work in similar principle to feet-specific debuffs.

Hoping groin shots have a big boost to knock-down!

Edit: love the increase in gear slots / simulation approach btw. Another bonus to making hands distinct from arms: gloves as yet another gear slot.

Edit 2: you could drop torso to 50%, with hands being 5%.
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
https://stygiansoftware.com/infusion/devlogs/7-new-armor-mechanics.html

happening-bunker.gif
 

CHEMS

Scholar
Joined
Nov 17, 2020
Messages
1,563

Another problem with the old model was that all resistances stacked globally. Meaning: resistances from boots and helmets were equally effective as body armor and they all aggregated when it came to interacting with incoming damage. This made me really hesitant to put a lot of resistances on helmets and boots because, on one hand, I didn't want them to make the high resistance armors completely broken by just maxing (or near maxing) out all the resistances and, on the other hand, I didn't want these items, because of their high resistances, becoming mandatory for characters that use ligher armor in the body slot.
It's over, tincuckbros
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,755
so not getting hit in first place will be even more important!
 

Ryzer

Arcane
Joined
May 1, 2020
Messages
5,782
How about making the game... fun instead of seeking the perfect balance of all hell?

When are you going to make a changelog about adding fun to the game?
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
The whole armor system is pretty different, with grazes and a damage calculation formula that de-emphasizes % resistance.
I was actually fearing threshold was getting removed at some point but I should have had faith, it has a different name and it's actually buffed as it applies at the very end, which is even stronger than DT was in the 2D Fallouts where it was applied before DR.
Coverage stat is kind of weird but we did get practice with the concept from riding jetskis in Expedition I guess.
At any rate we've only seen some of the coming Happening, there's nothing about materials yet.

It's over, tincuckbros
It does look like a downgrade but tincucks may be rescued by good soak values on gear, and how the material system works with quality metal components.
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,755
first impression: its ridiculous.

Oh no, my boots are not covering my heels and I happen to be achilles.
Oh no, through rng my opponent scored a hit!
Oh no, through rng my opponent is hitting my foot.
Oh no, through... more rng its hitting my heel.
Oh nvm, its not the center of my foot, so its half the dmg!
Oh wait, feet only incur 40% of the pain.
Am I good then?

I hope that new system will take into account if you are hitting someone from the side, when half of the limbs are covered!
 

Abu Antar

Turn-based Poster
Patron
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
13,645
Enjoy the Revolution! Another revolution around the sun that is. Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Dev Log 7: New Armor Mechanics


← DEVLOGS

2023-11-17

Hi guys,
It's that time of the year again. All the stars and planets are in the right position and it's time for an Infusion dev log.
We already showed you the extent to which we upgraded the visual aspects of the engine, but the mechanical changes that I've done so far and am yet to do are just as extensive, and perhaps more radical. I'm going to talk about them one by one, in separate dev logs, as I continue to test, tweak, and refine them.
Our immediate goal with the engine and the game is to (re-)implement a number of items and mechanics, get a few areas together, and get the game in a state where it can be played for real, so to speak. Mainly so I can better asses how all these changes work in practice, but also so we can produce a short demo video and show you the game in action for the first time.

* * * * * * * * * *

So, anyway, let's get to the changes to the armor mechanics and damage resistance in general.
In Underrail, the damage resistance was divided into percentual resistance and flat threshold. Incoming damage would be reduced either percentually or by flat amount, whichever would reduce more damage in any given case. This caused a lot of balancing problems. Threshold was generally either useless or overpowered (especially when stacked in early game), while resistance was hard to progress with armor quality, as its percentual nature made it already scale innately.
All these problems really came to forefront when I was implementing different types of shotgun shells in Expedition. Balancing usefulness of different shells in this system was just impossible and it took a lot of tweaking to make it even remotely decent with liberal use of seemingly arbitrary threshold and resistance ignore factors. At one point I was tempted to just implement a completely different interaction for the shells specifically, but decided against it for the sake of consistency.
Another problem with the old model was that all resistances stacked globally. Meaning: resistances from boots and helmets were equally effective as body armor and they all aggregated when it came to interacting with incoming damage. This made me really hesitant to put a lot of resistances on helmets and boots because, on one hand, I didn't want them to make the high resistance armors completely broken by just maxing (or near maxing) out all the resistances and, on the other hand, I didn't want these items, because of their high resistances, becoming mandatory for characters that use ligher armor in the body slot.
There are other problems too, but these are the main issues, I think.

So how does the Infusion's new system differ from the old one?



In Infusion we're going to have a lot more gear slots, mainly from separating body armor and helmets into multiple component slots. This will provide the player with a lot more damage resistance sources. But unlike in the old system, these resistances will not stack. Instead, they will all interact with any given attack separately. So whenever you're struck somewhere on the body, the game will check what armor covers that spot, and it will interact with that armor piece. If there are multiple pieces, it will go through each of them separately, from the outer toward the inner. E.g. you might have some minor resistances on the overcoat that will interact with an incoming bullet or a stab before your torso armor.
For now, I have no intention to allow the player to choose which part of the target's body they're attacking (Fallout style), but there will be different special attacks / stances that will influence this (e.g. decapitate). Also, elevation and size of attacker and the target will also play a role here. So, for example, attacking someone from an elevated position will give you a better chance to hit them in the head and worse (if any) chance to hit their feet.
Different types of creatures will have different body part arrangements. For humans it is as follows: Head (5%), Torso (55%), Arms (10%), Legs (including the pelvis) (25%), Feet (5%). The number in brackets is the current working chance to hit distribution for a generic ranged attack. These numbers will vary for different attacks and situations, but it should give you some general idea what areas are going to be most important to cover with armor in most situations.


Depending on the armor design itself, it may end up covering one or more body parts. In the example of an armored rig/vest, which is the only crafted armor at the moment that's implemented, in addition to covering the torso, it can also provide some additional protection to arms and legs.

Let's go through the examples above. The armor on the left only provides cover to 80% of the torso part. Like the icon indicates, it does not cover the stomach all the way down. We'll talk about the intricacies of coverage later.
The armor in the middle, however, also sports sleeves and a groin guard. The groin guard covers the rest of the belly in the torso part and also covers the groin area, of course, which falls under the legs part. The sleeves cover the shoulders area of the arms part.
The armor on the right has sleeves, but no groin guard.
Regarding coverage, the way we're going to determine at which point an attack lands in a given body part, and so if it interacts with an armor segment that provides partial coverage, is still under consideration. The tooltip here provides just the coverage percentage, but the icon itself is trying to further illustrate what area of the part is covered. Having 20% coverage in arms at the top (shoulders) is not the same as at the bottom (hands) as both of these can be layered over. It doesn't make much sense that, if you are wearing gloves and shoulder pads, a bullet attack can go through both of these.
The way I treat the coverage number, which is esentially a floating point pair (e.g. 0.8-1.0 for shoulders, 0.0-0.2 for hands), is that 0 is the lowest point of the body part and 1 is the top point of the body part and 0.5 is the middle.

* * * * * * * * * *

Now, if you are an RPG mechanics connoisseur, as you surely must be if you made it this far into the dev log, you might be looking at that armor at the left and thinking how fun it's going to be to get hit by stray bullet to the torso right below your endgame crafting-maxxed armored vest and instakilled 20 hours into your ironman DOMINATING run. And I share your enthusiasm for suffering. However, as this kind of experience might not be pleasurable for most players, there are some additional considerations that I'm going to have to give to this.
One of the mechanics that are in place right now is that there is such a thing as grazing shots, which are basically hits that deal about half as much damage. They occur when the attack roll is within the graze part of the hit chance, the size of which is determined by attack-to-defense ratio. I don't want to get into too much details regarding this right now, as the topic is extensive and this dev log is already too long (it warrants its own). What is relevant for the example above is that the farther you are into the graze area of the roll, the farther the hit lands from the center of the body part.
So, basically, the lethal bullet hit described above would deal half the damage, giving you a better chance to survive. Whether this will be enough to make these situations acceptable, remains to be seen through testing. Just know that I am aware of this potential problem with the system.
So what about other body parts? Are we going to have to cover every bit of our body with heavy armor to avoid the similar scenario? What about getting hit with a plasma gun critical to the pinky toe while wearing tabis? Well, first of all, the chance to get hit in the feet is quite low, outside insects biting you or stepping on caltrops or acid.
Additionally, each body part has its innate damage taken modifier and they are currently set to these values: head - 150%, torso - 100%, arms - 40%, legs - 60%, feet - 25%. So the armor value of your footwear is not nearly as important as your body armor, while if you don't wear a helmet to a gun fight, you're taking quite a risk.
All these numbers are subject to change, of course.

* * * * * * * * * *

The last point I want to cover are the armor values themselves. As you might have noticed, the old format of percentage resistance / flat threshold is gone. What we have now is resistance / soak / material type.
Firstly, ignore these particular numbers, they are just random placeholders. I haven't gotten to writing real component specs yet. That said, let's go through all these values.
Resistance is the first line of defense, so to speak. It is checked against the incoming damage in order to determine what percentage of it will go through the armor. The formula goes something like this (there's also armor penetration, armor bypass and other mods, but for simplicity's sake, we're going to ignore those for now):
damage_done = incoming_damage * (incoming_damage / (incoming_damage + resistance))2

So if the resistance and damage values are the same, the incoming damage is multiplied by 0.25. That is, quarter of it goes through. If the incoming damage is twice the resistance, it's multiplied by 0.43, and for the other way around it's 0.1.
This formula is subject to change, of course, pending testing. But the general idea is that the ratio between damage and resistance is what determines the percentage reduction instead of it being fixed on the item. This makes the resistance much easier to scale/progress.

After the formula above is applied, soak value is deducted:
final_damage_done = damage_done - soak

So, unlike threshold, soak will now be an important stat throughout the playthrough as it is always applied at the very end, reducing already percentually reduced value.
The final property of damage resistance is the material type. I haven't started implementing this yet, but the idea is that this will modify the inputs to the formulas above, and maybe even formula itself, depending on the type of the attack and the type of material. For example, kevlar is going to be really good against bullet attacks, but not that good against other attacks.

* * * * * * * * * *

That's it for now. There are a lot more mechanical changes that are either implemented or are being implemented, so expect more dev logs in the near future. But then again, I always say that and then skip nearly a whole year without posting.
Also, follow me on Twitter, where I post smaller tidbits occasionally.

Cheers.
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
Yeah I'm not sure why damage-reducing grazes are necessary, when it's fully under your control whether you choose to wear a complete armor suit or one that has holes in the defense. You get what you pay for.
Body part multipliers on the other hand are kind of necessary if you only have one health pool and are trying to simulate body parts, it's very much like Counterstrike in that regard.

Also Styg didn't mention it directly but it seems like shotgun shells will now be balanced by spraying many body parts at once, which is naturally difficult to defend against with this armor system. They have a pretty weird innate ability to penetrate armor even with birdshot shells in vanilla UR.
 
Last edited:

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,755
More inventory autism is always welcome
first impression: its ridiculous.

Oh no, my boots are not covering my heels and I happen to be achilles.
Oh no, through rng my opponent scored a hit!
Oh no, through rng my opponent is hitting my foot.
Oh no, through... more rng its hitting my heel.
Oh nvm, its not the center of my foot, so its half the dmg!
Oh wait, feet only incur 40% of the pain.
Am I good then?

I hope that new system will take into account if you are hitting someone from the side, when half of the limbs are covered!
 

Covenant

Savant
Joined
Aug 3, 2017
Messages
351
The armour system sounds very similar to the one used by Hellmoo (which had some very solid gameplay systems in a swamp of completely cursed content/playerbase/drama), with the exception of the coverage mechanic and having discrete slots instead of having a variable, strength-based capped limit on how much armour could cover any one body part.

Slightly disappointed that it sounds like you probably won't be able to instantly take down armoured behemoths by getting a lucky critical hit to the feet, but oh well.
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
Styg why have feet separate from legs, but hands not separate from arms? I imagine you have specific debuffs in mind for all the listed areas, and I think there's a flavor of hand-specific debuffs that are thematic and work in similar principle to feet-specific debuffs.

Hoping groin shots have a big boost to knock-down!

Edit: love the increase in gear slots / simulation approach btw. Another bonus to making hands distinct from arms: gloves as yet another gear slot.

Edit 2: you could drop torso to 50%, with hands being 5%.
I think it's because feet interact with the ground and ground hazards like acid, while legs do not, so the gear will be different between them. It's a dynamic that isn't really there with hands and arms.

Naturally this makes me think of what would happen if this game has knockdowns and you get knocked down in a pool of acid.
 

Butter

Arcane
Patron
Joined
Oct 1, 2018
Messages
7,812
I think if you're going to this degree of simulation, the logical next step is to get rid of hit points. Damage done to a limb should injure or cripple said limb. Damage done to head or torso should be incapacitating or immediately lethal.
 

Infinitron

I post news
Staff Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
97,694
Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Additionally, each body part has its innate damage taken modifier and they are currently set to these values: head - 150%, torso - 100%, arms - 40%, legs - 60%, feet - 25%. So the armor value of your footwear is not nearly as important as your body armor, while if you don't wear a helmet to a gun fight, you're taking quite a risk.

If you're going to do this, maybe just go all out:

6ae83642ae1387266fee7624ad95d86fbce436cc.png
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
Styg can you confirm that we are getting supermutants who notice that you're blocking their acid pool damage with your boots, so they pick you up and body slam your whole body into the acid for 999 acid damage?
 

ciox

Liturgist
Joined
Feb 9, 2016
Messages
1,315
Additionally, each body part has its innate damage taken modifier and they are currently set to these values: head - 150%, torso - 100%, arms - 40%, legs - 60%, feet - 25%. So the armor value of your footwear is not nearly as important as your body armor, while if you don't wear a helmet to a gun fight, you're taking quite a risk.

If you're going to do this, maybe just go all out:

6ae83642ae1387266fee7624ad95d86fbce436cc.png
It's definitely gonna be "all out" when you have to choose which body part to heal when your health hypo has 12 turns of cooldown.
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,755
Naturally this makes me think of what would happen if this game has knockdowns and you get knocked down in a pool of acid.
or if you take uncanny dodge feat - it clearly shows your character doing parkour around


It's definitely gonna be "all out" when you have to choose which body part to heal when your health hypo has 12 turns of cooldown.
oh no, ive healed wrong leg!
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,755
Additionally, each body part has its innate damage taken modifier and they are currently set to these values: head - 150%, torso - 100%, arms - 40%, legs - 60%, feet - 25%. So the armor value of your footwear is not nearly as important as your body armor, while if you don't wear a helmet to a gun fight, you're taking quite a risk.

If you're going to do this, maybe just go all out:

6ae83642ae1387266fee7624ad95d86fbce436cc.png

What do you think dmg range on weapons is abstraction of? With this system I hope it becomes constant?
 

Tweed

Professional Kobold
Patron
Joined
Sep 27, 2018
Messages
2,891
Location
harsh circumstances
Pathfinder: Wrath
What dirt did Sawyer dig up on Styg to force these changes to the game? Is he holding you at gunpoint? Blink twice for yes.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Back
Top Bottom