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Interview Interview with the Torment Triumvirate at Gamestar.ru

Infinitron

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Tags: Adam Heine; Colin McComb; InXile Entertainment; Kevin Saunders; Torment: Tides of Numenera

The folks at Gamestar.ru scored an interview with Torment: Tides of Numenera leads Colin McComb, Kevin Saunders and Adam Heine. Here are some of the more interesting bits:

What about the gameplay? What can you say about the role-playing system of Tides of Numenera?

Adam: We're adapting the system for Monte Cook's tabletop RPG Numenera. Numenera has a ridiculously smooth tabletop system, with only three character statistics, broad skill definitions, and a strong emphasis on collaborative storytelling. But we won't be creating a computerized version of the tabletop game—that would be too simplistic for a CRPG. Instead, we're working closely with Monte to adapt and add to the tabletop rules in a way consistent with Monte's vision for the game, while still being complex and interesting enough for a CRPG.​

We're still at work adapting it, but what we do know is there will still be three character stats. There will be a defined set of skills, including some skills not found in a typical RPG. And we're working on ways to adapt Numenera's unique GM intrusion and XP mechanics.​

How much the player will be free in choosing what he will do? Will an open world be in Torment: Tides of Numenera?

Adam: It won't be a true open world in the sense that you can go wherever you want in search of the next story thread. But giving the player choices that matter is very important to us. So while the player might not be able to walk all over the world map until they meet certain story beats, they will have a variety of choices of how to reach those beats, each of which will have a significant impact on the story and the world. Additionally, though the story beats may determine which locations the player has access to, they will have significant freedom of movement within those locations.​

How serious our choices and actions will affect the storyline? How many endings will be in the game?

Adam: Like I said, one of our primary goals is to give the player choices that matter. They won't be easy choices either. You might be asked to choose between sacrificing a companion or allowing a village to be destroyed—or you might find a third option which will have consequences of its own. The theme driving the story is "What does one life matter?" and throughout the game, you'll find that your choices and actions matter very much.​

We're still talking about how many endings there will be. Though that might even be the wrong question. The main conflict of the story might have a limited set of ways it can play out, but the ending as a whole will probably be a more organic combination of story pieces, naturally evolved from the way that you played the game.​

There's also a question at the end about the Definition Of An RPG™. Kevin Saunders' reply is that for the purposes of creating a Torment game, it doesn't really matter.
 

crawlkill

Kill all boxed game owners. Kill! Kill!
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Nice dodge, Kevin.


It's the kind of question that unnecessarily divides fans. Why court bitchiness by answering it? Never create a divisive soundbyte.

Does anyone have a quick writeup on how Numenara's tabletop works? I'm semi-up on my indie TT games, but I'd never heard of this bitch until Torment. Is it even out yet? (questions google could and will answer far faster than this board)
 

Septaryeth

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Tags: Adam Heine; Colin McComb; InXile Entertainment; Kevin Saunders; Torment: Tides of Numenera

There's also a question at the end about the Definition Of An RPG™. Kevin Saunders' reply is that for the purposes of creating a Torment game, it doesn't really matter.

Their blog has a more detailed/shortcut version on the definition, but yeah, you can sum it up with "it doesn't really matter".
http://tormentrpg.tumblr.com/post/53829844016/international-interviews-with-the-torment-team

"I don’t worry about definitions very much anymore. I don’t mean that definitions aren’t important — having common terminology is critical to communicating with others. But what makes something an RPG, or not, doesn’t strike me as a very practical thing to consider. Each game is trying to create its own experience for the player and there are so many valid combinations of features and approaches."
 

Oesophagus

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Numenera has a ridiculously smooth tabletop system, with only three character statistics, broad skill definitions, and a strong emphasis on collaborative storytelling

From a Torment successor, I expect nothing less than shit combat
 

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