Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

Return of the Obra Dinn

Tiospo

Learned
Joined
Aug 1, 2018
Messages
129
Just saw the newest trailer. I like the sound of the voice acting, and the visual improvements to the ship and it's crew are always nice to see. Though the release date of 1818 confuses me. Are you just saying 2018 in-universe, or...?
 

Boleskine

Arcane
Joined
Sep 12, 2013
Messages
4,045
https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/...he-obra-dinn-review-prepare-to-be-transported

Return of the Obra Dinn review - prepare to be transported
Stirring stuff.

png

The Papers, Please creator offers up an intricate and mesmerising puzzle game with a rich and detailed sense of place.

Christian Donlan
Features Editor

"You can't stir things apart," says Thomasina, the brilliant teenage mathematician and physicist in Tom Stoppard's Arcadia. Thomasina is talking, I think, about entropy, and entropy is one of those fascinating, dizzying subjects that can make a person wish they had kicked off their Obra Dinn review with a close reading of a Bryan Ferry lyric instead. No matter, Thomasina is talking about the way that the present generally looks like the past after it's been through a blender. She is talking about the force that means we can remember yesterday and not tomorrow. (For more on all of this you could do a lot worse than tracking down James Gleick's wonderful book Time Travel: A History.) Sad stuff, I reckon, because there are so many things you might want to stir apart. Over the course of this morning alone I can think of two or three at least. You can't stir things apart: amazing, amazing line - so rich and funny and direct and unpatronising and profound. I often walk around my house when nobody is there speaking it aloud to myself and the cats. I will probably crochet it on something one of these days.

Anyway, in Return of the Obra Dinn, guess what? You can stir things apart, albeit only temporarily and with very limited agency. This transgression requires magic, which this wonderfully tactile and rigorous game is very happy to accomodate, and this magic is deployed in the name of a great bureaucratic truth. Lucas Pope, who once wrung such drama from the stamps and passports of a border crossing kiosk in Papers, Please, has now delivered a great "insurance adventure", a romance of book-keeping on the high seas, four years in the making. Speaking of four years, in 1803, the Obra Dinn, a merchant ship of 800 tons, 18 ft draught, was lost at sea with all 51 souls (or were there more?). In 1807 it is back, devoid of life, and ready for an audit and an inquest. It's your job to board the creaking ghost ship, starkly, ghoulishly bereft in powdery white lines picked out against a muddy sepia background, and uncover what happened and how much insurance is to be paid out. But with nobody left alive, how do you proceed? Magic. Magic of a most practical kind.

Your first tool is a magical pocketwatch that allows you to interrogate any sun-bleached skeleton you find on deck by revisiting the moment of its owner's death. Actually, you are transported to a moment a few seconds before their death: you hold out the pocketwatch, the hands spin madly (the arrow of time is having a funny spell), the music riffs bracingly, and then the Obra Dinn briskly stirs things apart. What follows is a very short audio drama - always far less than a minute - with the text appearing on the otherwise blank screen to the accompaniment of the spoken dialogue and the creaks and shudders of the good ship. Then, you are suddenly able to explore the very instant of death, frozen in place via a diorama that you can walk around and poke about in.

jpg

The choice of art styles really pays off. This game feels like no other.

What instants! A blast of lightning up in the rigging, the boom and backscatter of a runaway cannon. Nothing in Obra Dinn deserves to be spoiled, but the game is astonishingly good at capturing the strange otherworldliness of human chaos, that rupturing sense of affront at the sheer unlikeliness of what has come to pass. Heads are cleaved, skin is shredded, bones are splintered, and the bystanders! You never saw such bystanding - arrested while running away from calamity, running towards calamity, turning in surprise, or still, touchlingly, sweetly oblivious for a few nanoseconds more.

Next comes the second tool at your disposal, a magical book that breaks the Obra Dinn's damned voyage down into chapters. At the start of the game the chapter headings are all present but the pages are blank. They fill themselves in with each death you uncover - and frequently one death will lead to more, since the pocketwatch can move from a skeleton that's physically survived intact on the Obra Dinn to reveal, one at a time, the ghosts of other bodies, and other moments of death, that preceded them. This book! It doesn't just list the locations of bodies and record the dialogue from the audio clips, it also poses questions, always the same questions, and this is where the game itself comes to life. Who is this? the book will ask when you emerge from the frozen moment of death, and what killed them?

God, there are a lot of people on board. One of the most interesting observations in Obra Dinn is that a ship like this was a little world - dozens of people living together in almost unimaginably sweaty and elbows-to-armpits proximity. These people lived and worked together, and they were drawn from almost all nations of the earth. They made friends and enemies and they kept secrets.

jpg

Pope has done brilliant things with the intersection of human fallibility with the deathless rituals of bureaucracy before, but the game in his back catalogue that Obra Dinn most reminds me of is not Papers, Please, but 6 Degrees of Sabotage, a browser-based affair in which you uncover a saboteur by tracking their movements through varying crowds of suspects. And then, at the end, you have to be confident enough in your deductions to shoot the person you have picked out.

All of this feeds into the challenge of working out who they are. What clues do you have? The dialogue you've heard, for starters: did anyone use any names? Can you link those names to the people in the diorama? But wait, can you infer anything from the uniforms these people are wearing, from the accents they spoke in? Can you cross-reference what you've seen against a crew list in the book that gives names and nationalities? Can you match that to several pictures of life aboard the Obra Dinn that are included? Can you maybe take into account the location of the death, reviewing the maps of the ship's various decks, with helpful notes as to who worked where? Can you freestyle it just a little, assuming that people who are sat together in pictures may have had similar jobs? Actually, does the glossary listing the meanings of the various jobs provide any help?

Long story short, halfway through Obra Dinn I realised that what I was essentially playing was nautical murder Sudoku. In Sudoku - and stop me if you know this one - you must take a 9x9 grid and fill each 3x3 square of it with the numbers 1-9, each occurring only once. These numbers must also occur only once in each row and column of the wider grid. Luckily, there are a few numbers in place at the start to guide you. Amazingly, this is a recipe for genuine fun.

So how do you proceed? In Sudoku, you slice and dice. You deduct that a 4, say, in this row and that column must mean that the only remaining place for a 4 in this section is here. And so it is with Obra Dinn, but you're using accents, jobs, uniforms, and anything else that can be deployed. This man spoke with an American accent - how many Americans are there on the ship? This man claims to have a brother on board - how many brothers can I spot?

jpg

There's nothing quite like Obra Dinn, but if you're in the market for the next closest thing, it's probably 2000 to One: a Space Felony.

Once you've decided who died and what killed them - and the last part is often as tricky to divine as the first - you write them in the book where your answer appears in loose handwriting. Once you have three correct entries, the magical book magically confirms your deductions and the handwriting is replaced by the cold typewriter font of fact. Always these confirmations come in threes, so you can't just spam different names and different reasons for dying, I suspect, and there is a real thrill of satisfaction when you realise - yes! - you're slowly making headway. Over time, these individual deaths, presented in what initially seems like no real kind of order, slowly start to hint at a wider narrative. Keep stirring! There are wheels within wheels here, and ultimately, you can stitch all these scattered deaths together into a wider tragedy of great weirdness and richness, spotting people in early scenes who you've already seen killed in later scenes and realising that there was more to that death than initially seemed possible.

At the same time as the narrative unfolds - and speaking of unfolding, after my first playthrough, I was nowhere near the number of solved deaths needed to unlock the final twist and even now it eludes me - an oddly sensitive portrait of life onboard a merchant ship evolves. Despite the limited palette - perhaps because of it, eh readers? - the Obra Dinn is one of the most fully realised locations I've ever encountered in a game. It has carpenters, animals for slaughter, barrels and crates of mysterious stuff, a whole deck full of cannons.

It is a joy to poke around as the game slowly opens up new spaces. It is a pleasure - and a very harmonious pleasure - to come to an understanding of how different parts of the ship slot together, where people sleep, where they work, where they gather for a game of cards. That powdery white line that draws this bleak world is surprisingly adept at giving a sense of the material reality of the ship - razor sharp on the rarely-used stairs you use to climb aboard, breaking into radar-like speckles when ghosting an outline of waves into life. As your clues mount up and the images in the book become less and less fuzzy, so the world comes into focus. You are not just exploring a place, you are slowly getting a sense for it. What an astonishing game. What an incredible piece of work.
 

Wirdschowerdn

Ph.D. in World Saving
Patron
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Messages
34,774
Location
Clogging the Multiverse with a Crowbar
Review: Return of the Obra Dinn
2018-10-18 09:00:00by Patrick Hancock
19

My favorite game about being an insurance agent


This is the first game that actually made me feel like a detective. I've played tons of games that have tasked me with solving some mystery, only to have it boil down to either not being able to fail ,or just plain easy and boring.

Return of the Obra Dinn forces you to use deductive reasoning and logic without spoon-feeding answers. It also sports a unique visual style and some wonderful little tunes! If you've ever wanted to really think like a detective, this is the game for you. Leave it to Lucas Pope, developer of Papers, Please, to absolutely knock it out of the park...again.

poster-noscale.jpg


Return of the Obra Dinn (Mac, Windows [reviewed])
Developer: Lucas Pope
Publisher: 3909 LLC
Released: October 18, 2018
MSRP: $19.99


The less known about what actually happens in Obra Dinn (or should I say on the Obra Dinn), the better. As players first explore the ship, they will come into the possession of a magical pocketwatch-looking-thing that allows them to "re-live" the moment of death for any corpse found on the ship. Each time, the sounds and dialogue that led up to the event will play and, just as the moment of death occurs, the player is instantly transported to that spot and time. From there, they may explore the surrounding area and examine the scene, frozen in time.

The first time at a scene is limited -- the screen will fade to black soon enough and then it's time to move on. It is possible to re-visit any and all of these memories at will, and there is no time limit in successive visits. The goal is quite simple -- log the names and cause of death for each of the 60 people aboard the ship. This may sound tedious when reading it, but trust me, it is anything but.

Again, I'm not going to give anything away. But the pacing at the beginning of Obra Dinn is a masterpiece. The game gets your attention with a small-scale scene, with bits of intrigue strewn about, then BAM! It hits you with the "OH SH--" moment and instantly changes...well, everything. And just when you think you've got it figured out, BAM! Another crazy moment that comes out of nowhere. Seriously, don't get comfortable in your assumptions.

Return of the Obra Dinn gives players everything they need to succeed. With a handy-dandy notebook in tow, access to things like a list of the crew members, a map of the boat and its route, and crew sketches are readily available at all times. As players explore each memory, they can zoom in on a character and the game will display where they are in the sketches. From there, it's up to the player to mark down who they are, how they died, and who killed them.

Things are decided by choosing from a list. When picking the name of someone, the game will display the list of crew members for the player to select from. Certain verbs are available to choose from when deciding how someone died, and the crew list comes up once again when choosing who the murderer was (if applicable). It's all very intuitive, though navigating the book can feel clunky after each scene has been explored and it's time to cross-reference people and events from different sections.

The mechanics are simple (think Clue on crack), the story is epic and surprising, and there's enough mystery here to keep players guessing for quite some time. After viewing each memory, the player has a chance to basically finish the game, but they won't get the "good" ending. That will take a lot more time. Lucas Pope lists it at anywhere between 6 and 40 hours, depending on your deductive reasoning skills. I still haven't finished every single person and their cause of death, but at the pace I've been heading in, I'd expect to finish up in about 10 - 12 hours. Maybe that's "not enough time" for you to justify a $20 purchase, but considering how exciting and enthralling each moment of Obra Dinn is, I'd say it is absolutely worth it.

clue-noscale.jpg


The visuals harken back to the Macintosh era of graphics, though there are color filters to emulate your favorite old-school one-color screens. Lucas Pope uses this to great effect and certain scenes are absolutely breathtaking. The visuals absolutely had to be clean, as deciphering the cause of death often requires a keen sense of observation (though many times it is very obvious).

Small musical cues are also used perfectly. I didn't notice how catchy these were at first until I found myself mimicking them in the shower. They are only a few seconds long, and I love them all so much! Special shoutouts to the voice actors as well. More than usual, the voice actors accurately representing their characters is of the utmost importance as players may recognize an accent or voice inflection that allows them to pinpoint the identity of someone on the ship. Everyone in the sound department did a tremendous job.

This is a game I can not stop thinking about. I think about it at work -- either remembering crazy moments I didn't see coming, or reflecting on recently discovered information and its implications. This is absolutely a "thinking man's game," and it's one that I hope other developers (or Mr. Pope himself) decide to ape and expand on. Despite the fact that this isn't a detective game, I've never felt more like a dick.

[This review is based on a retail build of the game provided by the publisher.]

527519-header.jpg');


Return of the Obra Dinn reviewed by Patrick Hancock

9.5

Well, holy shit.
 

BlackGoat

Arbiter
Joined
Sep 15, 2014
Messages
505
Played a couple hours of this earlier. It's really good. Had to force myself to stop so I could actually get some work done today.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
Wait, it's out? How did I miss that?

It had been vaporware for years, and I even made a post about it earlier this year.

Possible contender for GOTY 2018 judging by the developer and reviews.

EDIT: Awesome, it's out on GOG as well. D2P for me. :D

EDIT 2: Managed to squeeze in the purchase before midnight, so it's a :d1p: for me.
 
Last edited:

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
There had been 'demos' out for a while, showcasing only parts of the game.

Also, slight correction: I thought I'd made a post about this game in the Current Year. My bad. It was over two years ago.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
Gave it a 'short try', ended up playing it for three hours. It's not as good a game as Papers, Please and is not a contender for GOTY, but it's still a solid murder mystery and a weird enough game to warrant a playthrough.

Its greatest strength is how much immersion and atmosphere it can squeeze into its bizarre presentation. First you get the audio (and subtitles) on a black screen for every death you're 'investigating', and then you get thrown into the freeze-framed moment of death with freedom of mobility, so it's like watching a abstract low-budget version of The Matrix.

Its greatest weakness is that it doesn't appear to have any replayability, unless you're the kind of person who can forget a murder mystery and return to it again some years down the line.

So far I've successfully logged nine fates, as in identified the person in question, how they died and by who (if relevant). I may have identified one or two more, but the game only confirms the fates in sets of three.

Identifying the crew is by far the hardest, and most enjoyable, part of the game. Blue Checkmarks will probably go ballistic when I say that I'm having the best luck identifying people by their gender, their race and their skin color. There's a single black man on the ship, and the crew roster has one man hailing from Sierra Leone, so that should be a slam dunk... but the game does everything it can to push back against this, stating that I haven't gathered enough clues. Uh-huh.

I do have one question where I'd like a clue: One of the easiest fates to identify is the Formosa guard who's executed by firing squad, as his name is spoken out loud and everything. However, what's troubling me is putting down exactly how he died. Obviously he was shot... but there are four men in the firing squad, plus their commanding officer and finally the Captain himself who reads out the sentence. Any idea on who of these I declare as the killer?

A few helpful pointers (non-spoilerish) to keep in mind:

# Check every corner of the ship. You would be surprised how some crew members met their final fate in a remote corner of the ship (like the ship's artist). Also, don't forget to look up.

# Some of the deaths are not related to humans, or corpses. In one case you'll look out a window, and at least one other involves a quadruped.

# The UI is kinda strange is that it sometimes only explains itself after you've done some action. Don't be afraid to experiment.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
Had another go at it. I was grossly wrong in thinking that there was only one black man aboard the ship. That's what I like about this game, it keeps springing surprises.

15 fates identified now, but I'm only accounting for 57 of the crew and the guy in the rowboat is telling me to haul ass because a storm's a-comin. No way, I'm sticking around.

And here's the bad news - this game is a Walking Simulator. Where it differs from most walking simulators is that you actually have to do something here, even though most of it involves sitting with a notepad and solving logic puzzles. In this way Obra Dinn is kinda like Myst.

I've gotten a good feel for the 'plot' of the game now, but a sizeable chunk is still missing, and there's an entire chapter locked away for some reason.
 

Boleskine

Arcane
Joined
Sep 12, 2013
Messages
4,045
https://www.pcgamer.com/return-of-the-obra-dinn-review/

Return of the Obra Dinn review
By Andy Kelly 2 hours ago

The merchant vessel Obra Dinn drifts into port, crewless and mysteriously abandoned, having disappeared some years earlier. You climb aboard, an insurance investigator, and begin to try and make sense of what happened to the crew—with a little help from a magical pocket watch.

This curious, arcane artifact, decorated with an ominous engraving of a grinning skull, lets you visit the moments before a person’s death in an attempt to establish what happened to them. But with the fates of sixty sailors to determine, this is no easy task—especially as Return of the Obra Dinn, a few lean tutorials aside, steadfastly refuses to hold your hand.

This is a first-person puzzle game from Lucas Pope, creator of the acclaimed Papers, Please. It’s completely 3D, but rendered with a bold, beautiful art style that recalls the 1-bit dithered visuals of old Macintosh adventure games. But the Obra Dinn is no less atmospheric for it. In fact, the sense of place created by its hard lines and limited palette is quite remarkable.

As you explore the ship you’ll find piles of sun-bleached bones that used to be the crew, and activating the pocket watch near them will whisk you away to a static, but wonderfully detailed, vignette of the seconds before they died—be it an unfortunate accident, a brutal murder, or something altogether weirder. And it’s here where your investigation really begins.

C2wgw68H6KM83bam22eYth-650-80.png


Determining the cause of death is normally the easiest part, because the evidence is right in front of you. You might see a man recoiling in pain as a shot from a flintlock pistol rips through him, or another taking a fatal tumble down a stairway. But the tricky part is discovering the identities of the people involved, which requires some real detective work.

There are a few ways to find out who someone is. In some death scenes there’s a short snippet of dialogue, and you might hear a name being called out. Or you’ll have to look at where a person is on the ship, or what they’re doing, to establish their identity. It’s safe to assume the guy in the workshop sawing a plank of wood is the carpenter, for example. But then again, maybe he isn’t. Things are rarely that simple in this game.

As well as the watch you have a notebook at your disposal. Here you can cross-reference your deductions with a manifest outlining the roles and nationalities of the crew, an illustration of them all gathered on the deck, and a glossary that explains some of the obscure, archaic nautical terms you’ll have to tangle with: often important clues to who a person is.

Whenever you make three accurate deductions, the notebook etches your conclusions—name, cause of death, and in some cases their killer—into the book permanently. This stops you brute-forcing your way through the game, randomly selecting names for each crew member from the manifest in the hope one sticks. But it also left me feeling at a loss sometimes, with no indication that I was hot or cold with my (sometimes way off the mark) theories.

VTA5988Y7MXCuzw2xBEsq-650-80.png


But then something hits you. You’ll be fumbling around in the lower decks, bouncing your head off the oak hull, when something slides into place in your mind. A moment from a previously-visited death scene that suddenly resonates with the current one. An identifying mark on a sailor. An accent in a dialogue snippet. And in a brilliant Sherlock-style flurry you’ll snap more pieces of the jigsaw puzzle together and make the image a little clearer.

These moments of success are rare, but all the more satisfying for it. A lot of my time with Return of the Obra Dinn was spent wandering the ship, tugging at loose threads, and seemingly getting nowhere. But knowing those moments of clarity were waiting to emerge kept me playing, even as the mind-map I was creating of the crew grew increasingly massive and unwieldy.

The game paints a vivid picture of life aboard the Obra Dinn, and with each chapter—unlocked by exploring and locating more bodies—a larger story begins to take shape. I won’t go into specifics about what befell the crew, because getting to the root of that is the core of the game, but I can say that this has to be the unluckiest merchant ship in the world, with so much chaos and calamity occurring on-board it’s amazing the thing is still floating.

Return of the Obra Dinn is a stunningly clever thing and one of the best puzzle games on PC. It not only presents you with a vast, complex, and interconnected mystery to solve, but trusts in your intelligence enough to let you do it yourself with almost no hints, markers, or guides interfering in the process. Few games have this much confidence in the player, and it’s a deeply satisfying experience as a result, even if I did occasionally feel like I’d hit a dead end.

qSxHRjbjWgVED3U69EK7i9-650-80.png


The Verdict
90
Read our review policy
Return of the Obra Dinn
A beautifully constructed and powerfully atmospheric mystery that you really have to work to solve.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
And finished. Nailed all 60 fates.

At around the 38 fates-mark I started to run into trouble, and resorted to brute-forcing some answers. Like the three Russians. I could determine their fates except for their names, so I just switched those around until it clicked. Then I did the same with the four Chinese topmen and finally the five English seamen/topmen. The English ones took me a bloody hour. After that it was just a case of finishing up the last fates until I hit 58, when I got a message saying I could not do more aboard the Obra Dinn.

The remaining two fates are resolved in a kind of epilogue (the mysteriously locked Chapter 8) that sadly doesn't have the shock reveal factor I was anticipating, but at least it wraps up the story.

The game logged my playtime as 6 hours, 47 minutes, so it's not a long game. But WOW is it a fun ride, especially for puzzler fans.

Return of the Obra Dinn is a meticulously master-crafted puzzle game, in an era where getting it done fast and sloppy is the de facto standard. Its unique graphical style, brilliant audio work and planned-out-to-the-last-detail level of quality makes this short ride a memorable one. Obviously only puzzle fans and wannabe-detectives need apply here for the gameplay. I'd give this game a 8.5-rating for puzzle lovers, but only a 7 for those that are not.

A few helpful hints:

# Don't forget who sent you the book and stopwatch.

# Some identities can be determined by catching people in their quarters... but keep in mind that 'quarters' here is a loosely-defined term.

# Accents and grammar are a BIG thing to keep an ear out for. You'll want to play this one with headphones.

# It's OK to profile crew members along stereotypical lines for races, ethnicity and gender, but don't go too far with it or you'll screw up.
 
Last edited:

Obatzda

Novice
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
1
I thoroughly enjoyed the game as well. I've been looking forward to it for quite some time ever since I played the demo. It's the video game version of one of those books of logic mysteries. Very tightly designed and the visuals are incredibly atmospheric. Felt similarly that Chapter 8 was perhaps a little bit lacking.

Since the game is clearly carefully designed down to slightest detail, it seems unlikely that much actual brute forcing is required. I never ran into that issue with the Russians or the English Seamen, but I did end up having to do so with the Chinese Topmen. I'd be curious to know if anyone found out a way to deduce their names.

There's a little detail about the Russians:
Only one of the Russians is a Topman and based on where he is in certain scenes you can identify him pretty straightforwardly which makes it a 50/50 between the remaining two
The English Seamen are a bit more involved:
When the Danish guy is killed his murderer mentions that it's revenge for his brother with the rope. This refers back to the incident in the first chapter were some one is crushed by cargo which locks those two in to being the Peters brothers. Brennan is called out to after the midshipman is stabbed in the escape chapter and that same dying midshipman gives you a clue regarding the second Peters brother's fate. That leaves two remaining English Seamen so another 50/50.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
Congrats on your first post, lurker.

I reached the same conclusion but could only base it on assumption, no hard facts. Still, I was quick to sort out the Russians because I did it the exact same way as you did.

I noticed the part about the brothers as well, my only problem was figuring out which was which. Brennan being called out was unconfirmed for the longest time, I needed to eliminate the other person present first.

The dying midshipman doesn't give you a clue about the second Peters brother's fate. No, he tells you the fate of the midshipman whose first name is Peter. Once you learn the fate of the third midshipman you can discern their names and fates.

The topmen are the bigger problem, with two Englishmen and a Scotsman and pretty much no info about them. That's what took me so long.
 

Unkillable Cat

LEST WE FORGET
Patron
Joined
May 13, 2009
Messages
27,432
Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
Video says that the game's attention to detail is a strong point... then complains that the game's attention to detail makes the game too challenging.

Video also uses the word "problematic" in that regard.

:nocountryforshitposters:

The only purpose the video serves is to be another +1 that likes the game. Considering that nine out of every ten Steam Curators I see recommend the game - that's turning into a very large bunch.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Back
Top Bottom