Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

System Shock Skin Deep - In space anyone can smell your farts

Spacer's Nugget

Learned
Patron
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
442
Strap Yourselves In
Hey, finally popping my "thread creator" cherry! I couldn't find one about the game on this prestigious forum of ours, so I thought "why not me?". Without further ado: Skin Deep!



When insurance corporations want to keep valuables safe, they freeze you and stow you onto their cargo starships. And when space pirates board the starship and trip the silent alarm, you unthaw, take a deep breath, and handle the situation.

Skin Deep is an immersive first-person shooter about sneaking, subverting, and sabotaging. You're outnumbered, outgunned, and have no shoes. Welcome aboard, operative.





Skin Deep is being developed by Blendo Games, mostly by one Brendon Chung, of Quadrilateral Cowboy fame, on the Dhewm 3 engine (a port of id Tech 4), and also making use of the DarkRadiant level editor (both with a few alterations).
 

Spacer's Nugget

Learned
Patron
Joined
Feb 23, 2021
Messages
442
Strap Yourselves In
https://www.gameinformer.com/interv...weird-fps-experience-where-cats-are-in-charge

Interview: Skin Deep Offers A Weird FPS Experience Where Cats Are In Charge
by Liana Ruppert on Jul 29, 2021 at 02:21 PM

What do you get when you have a team that just really wants to make a really weird shooter? A really weird shooter where cats are in charge. That's exactly what the team over at Blendo Games is doing, under the publishing umbrella of Annapurna Interactive, with its newest title called Skin Deep. There's sneezing, there is getting weird stuff stuck to the bottom of your feet, and there is the need to survive while trying to escape a group of pirates after being frozen on a cargo ship by an insurance firm run by ... cats. Yeah.

We sat down with Brendon Chung, the head of Blendo Games, to talk more about the studio's latest title. Coming off of creating some wild experiences like Atom Zombie Smasher, Thirty Flights of Loving, and more, Skin Deep fits right into the growing library of oddball experiences that are just about having fun. Not every game has to have a billion subplots, not everything needs to be super complicated to be enjoyed. With Skin Deep, it's about having fun, the thrill of a shootout, and not taking life too seriously.

So what is Skin Deep? It's a world where insurance corporations keep valuables safe, including people, they free you and store you into cargo starships. That's you. You're frozen. Everything is fine and dandy until a group of pirates decide to board the ship and throw everything into mayhem. It's up to you as the player to unthaw and throw yourself into the chaos using weapons and good 'ol fashioned stealth to try to survive in this sandbox. It's goofy but also challenging, providing the perfect blend of gameplay styles to make Skin Deep stand out.

So where does inspiration like this come from? "I grew up playing a lot of FPS games," Chung tells us. "I got my start making a game by doing maps for like Doom, Quake, Half-Life - things like that. So I've done a lot of FPS stuff, story games like Gravity Bone, but I haven't done anything where you just straight-up shoot people. A traditional FPS game and I love this genre, so I wanted to make it, and I did."

Chung continues, saying, "For me, I am a big Far Cry 2 booster, I just like how games like that play. I kept thinking this is like, playing an FPS for the first time. This is great stuff. So I kind of wanted to play with different ideas of like, what FPS could do like what I've always wanted to see an FPS and like, what are things we could do with a player body? And what are the things that a player's body can be and do and smell like? I just wanted to play with those ideas with questions like 'What are they? What do they felt like this?'"

He also adds that there is one additional component that he hopes players enjoy: "Oh, you can smell those games, which we're very proud of. We have tech that lets you climb into a trash chute and get ejected into outer space. And then when you kind of float out of space and climb back into the ship, there's a big message it says you are smelly, and then you will waft out green smell clouds from your body. And bad guys will smell you and they will track you down by your green smell clouds. And we have different systems for getting yourself clean again. So we're very excited to let people play with this."

The smell component is just one of the many oddities this game has, including the "sneeze system" that builds up when crawling through ventilation shops in an effort to play around with all of the things a body can do in-game. It's pretty interesting, and definitely a unique venture!

With Annapurna, as a publisher, doing so much to increase visibility for indies in the gaming space, I wanted to find out exactly how Chung feels about the current spotlight given to independent studios. "I used to work in the AAA space for about five years," he tells Game Informer. "And then in 2010, I went independent. And I think from my experience, I always feel that whenever I release anything, is just a giant crapshoot. I think sometimes things catch on, sometimes things don't. Like, sometimes I'll play a game that's like, really, really good. And then I'll read a report later that, like, this game didn't really sell very well. I'm like, what? How did this happen? And I'm gonna be honest, I don't fully understand. I mean, I think part of it is just that there are just so many games out there. And, there's so much free stuff now. I couldn't play this, this incredibly well-made game that's totally free, and I don't need to pay any money for it."

He adds, "There are a lot of new things happening. There are lots of like, free stuff for game pass stuff or whatever. So I think there's definitely a lot of things to figure out. I think my general approach to making stuff is that some things catch on, some things don't. And because there's just so much stuff out there. Sometimes things just kind of get lost in the wind. I think we're making something really cool. So I'm hoping I think the best I can hope for usually is like I hope this finds the audience of people that like this kind of thing. That was something like funny and lighter and like plays with ideas. But I think beyond that there are some things are sometimes like out of our control, which is a bummer, but I don't know."

We don't mean to alarm you, dear reader, but games are - in fact - hard to make. I know! Crazy, right? But they are! And that's something Chung talks about, as well. "I think that one thing that sometimes doesn't always get through [to people] is that games are hard to make and that when you want to make a game, you have to create each bit, you have to make all the parts of it. I think it can sometimes feel to some people that like, oh, you think I could just make this game in three months and it actually will take you two years, or whatever. But I think sometimes it's hard to understand that. It's not just like putting a puzzle where you put the pieces down, it's more of you don't know where the straight line goes, if it's even a straight line. It's more like a very, very squiggly line of like, 'ok, let's try this.' So it's a lot of different ideas that you first have to try and fail. And then you find the thing that works. And I think when people say yeah, I can make this in three months they might not be wrong, but coming up with all of these ideas and making them work takes a lot longer than that."

Skin Deep will be on Steam only, though future platform releases are being considered.
 

Wirdschowerdn

Ph.D. in World Saving
Patron
Joined
Nov 30, 2003
Messages
34,781
Location
Clogging the Multiverse with a Crowbar
Skin Deep is being developed by Blendo Games, mostly by one Brendon Chung, of Quadrilateral Cowboy fame, on the Dhewm 3 engine (a port of id Tech 4), and also making use of the DarkRadiant level editor (both with a few alterations).

Interesting choice. Commendable for not going with the unwashed Unreal/Unity masses. Will wishlist.
 
Self-Ejected

Netch

Self-Ejected
Joined
Jul 22, 2021
Messages
92
Saw a trailer for this a while ago and wasn't interested as it looked like a bit of a mess, probably in large part due to the poor trailer itself. These new trailers on the other hand actually look intriguing. I'd like to see some raw gameplay, since it still seems a bit vague (seeing the game's systems doesn't really tell me what you're actually meant to do or what it would be like to play it). Overall though this is starting to look cool, I'm definitely gonna keep an eye on it.
 
Last edited:

udm

Arcane
Patron
Joined
Aug 14, 2008
Messages
2,768
Make the Codex Great Again!
Just to share my 2c, I remember playing the older Blendo Games titles back when I was still using Gamersgate: Atom Zombie Smasher, Air Forte, and Flotilla. However, I found them to be very mediocre and shallow. Brendon had some good ideas, but the execution always fell short.
 

Child of Malkav

Erudite
Joined
Feb 11, 2018
Messages
2,678
Location
Romania
When is this supposed to come out? Jesus Chist all these games, Monomyth, Peripeteia, Neverlooted Dungeon, Skin Deep, Corpus Edax, Shadows of doubt and I'm only 1 man. Not mentioning BG3, Amnesia, Shadow Gambit and more.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Back
Top Bottom