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George Ziets opening a new RPG studio - Digimancy Entertainment

agentorange

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5,014
Codex 2012
Guy who mingles with such retards who would want 90% of Codex dead, and are unable to change a lightbulb but wanna change society into mental asylum so they can feel at home, has 0% chance of making based cRPG. Let us stop fooling ourselves. 43 pages of self-gaslighting is enough. /Thread unwatched
should be placed as the banner of this website or something to save everyone the trouble from making all of these countless threads and wasting hours and pages upon pages on speculating about whether or not some game will be good when there is really 0% chance it will be good. it was liberating for me when I realized this myself, around the time when Obsidian was making Tyranny and they had an interview with the writing team, and the writing team member's inspirations were stuff like Marvel comics or Fallout 3 and The Walking Dead TV show; and I had the realization that "oh ok these retards could never possibly make anything I would be interested in, why should I bother even wondering about the possibility." and it has only gotten worse now. it's like giving a bunch of babies a bowl of spaghetti and then everyone stands around and discusses about how there is a totally real chance that these babies will now make us a state of the art skyscraper. it's fucking stupid.
 

The Wall

Dumbfuck!
Dumbfuck Zionist Agent
Joined
Jul 19, 2017
Messages
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SERPGIA
Yeah, when you stop eating up false hope, things are rather simple. Life, politics, women. All is rather simple once you trim all the fat lies told by society and repeated by yourself

I mean it's not like there are no good games or RPGs made recently. King Arthur: Knight's Tale, ATOM:Trudograd, Vagrus, Gothic: Archelos, Elden Ring. Those are from past 10 months alone, and guarantee at least 200h of monocled entertainment. +100 TOP Codex RPGs and many more

If you have any semblance of life, why waste it on being worried wether one more RPG you might even not find time to play in this life will get made or not? Who gives a fuck, tbh. If game is woke or made by woke, I just press SKIP button
 

The Wall

Dumbfuck!
Dumbfuck Zionist Agent
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I'll make thread for my Codex brothers about woke=shit being literally true and how important is for you to understand it's no metaphore but unbreakable law of physics. Sooner you realize that, huge amount of your free time will be liberated and you'll be able to spend it on things that make you richer, better and happier man
 

Alienman

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Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2
Guy who mingles with such retards who would want 90% of Codex dead, and are unable to change a lightbulb but wanna change society into mental asylum so they can feel at home, has 0% chance of making based cRPG. Let us stop fooling ourselves. 43 pages of self-gaslighting is enough. /Thread unwatched
should be placed as the banner of this website or something to save everyone the trouble from making all of these countless threads and wasting hours and pages upon pages on speculating about whether or not some game will be good when there is really 0% chance it will be good. it was liberating for me when I realized this myself, around the time when Obsidian was making Tyranny and they had an interview with the writing team, and the writing team member's inspirations were stuff like Marvel comics or Fallout 3 and The Walking Dead TV show; and I had the realization that "oh ok these retards could never possibly make anything I would be interested in, why should I bother even wondering about the possibility." and it has only gotten worse now. it's like giving a bunch of babies a bowl of spaghetti and then everyone stands around and discusses about how there is a totally real chance that these babies will now make us a state of the art skyscraper. it's fucking stupid.

Nowadays, it's mostly to just talk about how screwed up the game can get, with many threads serving as a warning. Personally though, I do enjoy the history of things (regardless if it turns bad or not), like you can see projects announced and then in real time watch the history slowly taking form, people reacting to it, changes to the project etc. I think Codex is excellent in this way.
 

Roguey

Codex Staff
Sawyerite
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
31,496
Sure, but this dev exists for 3 years and the only thing we know about it is that Ziets is not married anymore.
Whoa, don't confuse George with Brian. George keeps to himself so there's no motivation to go into his personal life. :M
 

Viata

Arcane
Joined
Nov 11, 2014
Messages
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Location
Water Play Catarinense
Sure, but this dev exists for 3 years and the only thing we know about it is that Ziets is not married anymore.
Whoa, don't confuse George with Brian. George keeps to himself so there's no motivation to go into his personal life. :M
Yeah, my bad. I mistook them because of the video posted above. On the other hand, it turned out we have nothing at all about this dev then.
 

Roguey

Codex Staff
Sawyerite
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
31,496
Yeah, my bad. I mistook them because of the video posted above. On the other hand, it turned out we have nothing at all about this dev then.
We know they were working on a game for Paradox that got cancelled.
 

cyborgboy95

News Cyborg
Joined
Aug 24, 2019
Messages
1,760
https://digimancygames.com/news/interview-with-olga-moskvina
Interview with Digimancy Senior Writer Olga Moskvina
May 24
IMG_36832.jpg


1. How did you discover writing as a passion for yourself?

A passion for reading came first, as it does for most writers. The particular catalyst was classic Russian poetry, which I became acquainted with at the same time I was relearning Russian. Like many Russian children, I memorized passages from Pushkin's fairytales before I could read, but when I moved to the United States at age six, I was so desperate to fit in, I rejected the Russian language completely, refusing to speak it even at home. When I was nine, however, my family briefly returned to Russia and then moved to Odesa, Ukraine. My Russian and literature teacher in Odesa was an energetic, outspoken woman in her 50s who absolutely loved poetry. She talked about poets' lives as though she'd known them personally and then read their poems aloud with genuine feeling. I had to memorize and recite poems too (a standard exercise in itself), and she made me repeat every poem however many times it took to get the emotion across, not just the words.

So at ten, I started writing poems in Russian. It was a natural response to a gifted teacher's ability to inspire her students with love for her subject, plus the wonder of rediscovering my native language. As I got older, I wrote more and more, in different genres, and increasingly in English after returning to the United States. By the time I finished high school, I knew writing was simply part of who I was, regardless of my future career path.

2. How / when did you realize you could take that passion and apply it towards a career?

That depends on what you mean. I've considered a number of writing-heavy careers and even sampled a few. Before working in video games, my plan was to complete a Ph.D. in Slavic languages and literatures. I didn't have any illusions about the academic job market, but after years of teaching undergraduate composition, first as part of my MFA program, then as a full-time lecturer, I wanted to devote myself primarily to studies, come what may. It wouldn't have left much time for creative writing, but I've found academic discourse tremendously generative even when it's infuriating. When I think about it, I still feel a pang of regret about not returning to the Ph.D. program, but that brings me to the more relevant part of the answer.

I only realized there was a way for me to have a job where I could apply all my writing skills after I started working on Disco Elysium. My initial involvement in that project was a total fluke. I had only learned six months prior that there was such as thing as video games with interesting stories, dialogue, and item descriptions, and it occurred to me that someone must be employed to write them, but I was certain such opportunities were beyond my reach. You know that mindset—if you haven't been doing something since at least college, all bets are off. Then Disco happened, and I learned that I could write dialogue, figure out structures, and hold a lot of game states in my head, while also infusing a little poetry into the more descriptive nodes (my favorite skill to write was Shivers). I suddenly felt at peace. Like, yeah, this is where I belong.

3. Could you please share with us what your writing process looks like? And what are some of the things that you do to keep yourself growing and evolving as a writer?

My writing process really depends on the task and expectations. Something people may not think about when they imagine a day in the life of a video game writer is how much time one spends on documentation, as opposed to dialogue and other in-game text. Creating worldbuilding documents requires a lot of ideation and research, so that's where one starts—and hopefully doesn't get stuck for too long. Writing dialogue is another beast entirely, and there's also variation depending on what the goals are, how much direction one was given, whether it's a location description, object interaction, or conversation with an NPC. For locations, I may start by visualizing the place as the PC would experience it on arrival, really imagining myself there physically—sights, sounds, smells. For NPCs, I have to figure out the voice first, hear it in my head.

These days, I play a lot of narrative-driven games and discuss them with colleagues. Having gotten into games relatively recently, I still have some catching up to do. Before games, I used to read a lot of books, and I still do on occasion. The average writing quality in games is just not very high, but it's easy to lose sight of that and grow complacent when that's one's only point of reference. Then you pick up a good novel and realize—wow, games are really in their infancy in terms of the emotional and social complexities they have been used to communicate. I love looking at art and films with strong cinematography, on their own but also as nourishment for one's visual imagination. None of this is a replacement for lived experience, though, which for some people may be tending their garden, for others—backpacking across continents. Or for human connection, without which one's resources for compassionately portraying human situations are limited.

4. Do you need to know anything about programming or coding as a game writer? What are some of the skills outside of creative writing that you think could help aspiring game writers succeed in this career field?

You don't need to know how to code, although it may be helpful, especially in a small indie studio where people wear multiple hats. There are plenty of tools that allow one to bypass that need, beyond some very basic scripting, and many studios have in-house dialogue editors. Really, the best thing you can do is pursue a genuine passion outside of games. I've heard from multiple creative leads that they really want to work with people who come from other fields, be it botany or philosophy or engineering because they bring a fresh perspective. And no knowledge is ever superfluous for a writer.

5. What was one of your favorite characters or dialog scenes to write and what was it about this character or dialog that made it so meaningful to you?

While working on DE, I had the most fun writing Cindy the Skull, but ultimately my favorite dialogue was Ruby, the Instigator. It's a very intense, emotional scene, and it took me a while to find Ruby's voice.

(Spoilers ahead.)

Ruby needed to sound desperate, but I also wanted to imbue her with dignity that would contrast sharply with the demeanor of everyone who'd betrayed her—and Harry himself. When you, as Harry, present all your painstakingly collected evidence, and Ruby casually shoots it down, she's acting as a foil for a lot of what's wrong with the world. She's compassionate and honest. You don't get a lot of that in Revachol, not because there's anything fundamentally wrong with the people, but because the political and economic circumstances don't predispose anyone to trust and decency.

(End spoilers.)

Robert Kurvitz, our lead designer, wanted Ruby to sound very American, and that was very helpful direction—most of the characters in DE are off-European. I'm not quite the Ruby kind of American, but I could synthesize the voice from my experience. Still, I wasn't sure I got it right until I heard the VO. When you hear an actor read your lines as you heard them in your head, it's a really good feeling.

6. We all have goals we are working towards in our respective careers and roles, what is one outstanding goal that you would like to achieve in your career?

I feel like I should say "I want to be a lead on a project that's all my own," but that wouldn't be accurate. What's important is that good art gets made, not that one or another person is at the helm. When I was a teenager, it seemed all-important that my name go down in history, as a bulwark against mortality, but I've lived too much life since. I just want to help make more art, which is perhaps even more ambitious.

There's no question in my mind that Disco Elysium is art—we gave a lot of ourselves to make it so—and players have responded accordingly. People who don't usually play video games have contacted me, wanting to talk about DE as a literary achievement or as something that helped them get through a difficult time. When you hear things like that, you realize that you're not important. Moreover, my personal contributions to DE weren't significant relative to, say, those of one of the engineers currently working at Digimancy. I just love being part of a team that can make something better than I myself could possibly dream up. And really—only the work you do with like-minded people ever means anything, whether it's a business or a family or art. And the fun you have in the doing.

Why else bother?
 

vortex

Fabulous Optimist
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
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Temple of Alvilmelkedic
People who don't usually play video games have contacted me, wanting to talk about DE as a literary achievement
The way codex received and honored DE, proves we can be illiterate a bit.
 

LESS T_T

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Oct 5, 2012
Messages
13,444
Codex 2014

Infinitron

I post news
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Messages
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RPG Wokedex Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Kingmaker
https://digimancygames.com/news/companyupdatejune2022

Digimancy Company Update – June 2022​


OQ6HTmCs_400x400.jpeg


It’s 2022… two and a half years after Digimancy first came into being… and I probably should have written something like this sooner.

Since this is our first news update for Digimancy Entertainment, I thought I’d talk about the origins of the studio and what our team is trying to build.

The seeds for what would become Digimancy Entertainment were planted back in 2017. At the time, I had been in the games industry for about sixteen years and had gotten to know Kevin Saunders while working together on Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer and again on Torment: Tides of Numenera. We were joined on Torment by our fellow co-founder, Steve Dobos, who was Torment’s lead engineer and had worked with Kevin years before.

As a team with complementary talents, we recognized that we had a partnership founded on mutual trust and respect, and we believed that by working together, we could build a game studio that would be dedicated to making the games we love most - narrative-focused RPGs.

But “narrative-focused” can mean a lot of different things to different people, so what does it mean to us?

Most importantly, it means we’re a narrative-first studio. When we design our games, we start with a story or character experience. Then we develop game systems to bring our narrative elements to life. The opposite approach is more common in the games industry… and sometimes systems and narrative are developed separately, under the assumption that certain systems (e.g., combat) need to be in every RPG. However, we think a narrative-first perspective can lead to more innovative and immersive games and mechanics.

For us, player choice is inherently tied to narrative games. Many of our team members are rooted in the tabletop tradition, where story isn’t just a linear script – it’s a give-and-take between the storyteller and the players. No medium besides games can easily achieve that, and we want player choices to have real, game-changing consequences in our RPGs.

We also want to transport players to new and original worlds and evoke a sense of wonder and discovery. My own best experiences with games were the ones that introduced me to unfamiliar settings where I felt like a stranger in a strange land. In the best cases, all the elements of the game worked together to transport me to a different reality. That’s what we want our games to do, especially the ones developed for our own internal IPs.

As a studio, we’ve had our ups and downs. At the end of 2021, our publisher-funded project was cancelled. This isn’t uncommon in the industry, but it’s never a fun experience for a team that pours its creative heart into a game.

Nevertheless, we’re still here and hard at work on new things. One of those projects is our own internal RPG, a single-player game set in an original IP. Our team is also developing pitches for new RPGs and RPG-adjacent games. Strong pitches can come from anyone on the Digimancy team. We encourage all our team members to develop a pitch or contribute to someone else’s.We’re collaborating on a couple projects with other studios too, and we’re continuing to look for development partnerships with publishers and IP holders who might be interested in working with our experienced team of RPG devs.

As soon as we can share more about the games we’re making, we will. In the meantime, I want to thank our industry allies, mentors, and partners, as well as our friends, family, and fans. Our journey is just beginning, and we’re happy to have you with us.
 

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