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Giving Caesar 3 a whirl, amusing n00b mistakes

laclongquan

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IncendiaryDevice

What part of

BOW before the Random Number God!

That you have trouble with?

It's the charm of Caesar 3. If you dont like randoms and what easily understood mechanism with no strays, you can try Zeus.
The joy of Caesar3, after a sojourn among Zeus, is to figure out ways to prevent Randoms from fucking us over~:hailcthulhu:
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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Has anyone here played Caesar II before and how would you compare Caesar II vs Caesar III in terms of mechanics, city building and graphics?

I heared it has much better and more involved military aspect and more politics on city, province and Republic/Empire level. Don't know about city building and whether walkers function the same way they do in Caesar III...

Played the first mission of Caesar 2 on Normal difficulty after reading through the tutorial and it played fine. No bugs, no issues. The tutorial didn't tell you everything but the game doesn't have anything gamebreaking as of yet to trip you up from lack of information. The o'pedia is informative and useful and tells you pretty much everything you need to know.

The Bathhouses, theatres and educational facilities don't have any random walkers and the first two don't even need to be on a road.

The random walkers are the firemen, soldiers, taxmen and market traders + when you build a factory houses generate worker walkers with a range of work (but houses don't need to be next to a road).

The Reservoir takes up less squares and the fountains cover a wider area.

Because fewer buildings need roads you build less roads and the random walkers have much less need to travel about. In the first mission I only had 2 roads and one was a big circular around my houses, which the random walkers were happy to walk around. The game still offers the opportunity for more complex road systems to fuck you over but the requirement for roads is so much less that its unlikely it'll happen.

Houses wont collapse from a lack of furniture or pottery (LOL) because there are no requirements houses have other than area status.

You hire the amount of workers you need instead of the game making up the number from hidden percentages. Hiring workers costs Denali.

There are no farms in the city screen, you establish farms in your wider empire and only build the factories in your town.

So far, it's a truly delightful game, with that excellent HoMM era music, highly detailed individual design which must have been miles ahead of the curve in it's day with absolutely tuns of little things to micromanage exactly how you want them, both in the city screen and the region screen.

Where Caesar 3 is just about managing (LOL) random walkers, Caesar 2 is about managing your own personal empire and every little micro-detail that entails, from you own wages to the scouting route of your soldiers. Yes, the scouting soldiers in the regional map do not wander aimlessly about, you actually get a route planner! Revolutionary stuff!

While it's amusing catfood has been rating all of my posts in this thread either retarded or butthurt without ever offering his opinion I find it amusing that he suddenly jumps in at the moment when he knows I'm going to be trying Caesar 2 to try and preempt the obvious conclusion:

Caesar 3 is a broken piece of shit garbage with a one trick pony of random walkers as means to replace any form of difficulty.
Caesar 2 is a proper game, almost completely bug free and something you can fully self-manage right down to the very last detail.
 

catfood

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Yep, I knew you the game would be simple enough for you to enjoy, IncendiaryDevice. Thanks for proving my point. But should you find this one still too challenging for you later on I would suggest that you give this building management game a whirl. It will rock your socks off.
 

The Wall

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Alas, why Caesar IV couldn't have been a baby born from union of Caesar II's empire, province and other macro/micro management (especially non-linear campaign) aspects and Caesar III's charm and unique challenges based on geography and position of city in question while city building with especially walkers being handled in such a way that most buildings spawn walkers (if nothing then at least for the sake of diversity of citizens walking the streets) but you could set their routes though there would be an area of influence around building (for example Engineer's office) away from which they couldn't reach other parts of town and they would have some sort of movement points (which you could increase by spending more money and hiring additional engineers but there would be limit per building) and while you're setting route you can only cover those streets for which you have enough movement points.

Also you could leave to the game to automize this by giving none or some input (like prioritize these types of building inside area of influence etc.).

This is just a rough idea of how I would try to solve the problem of walkers and bridge the gap of having 'popamole' city building and 'too much' randomness with walkers. Also I'd keep and add other random elements of Caesar III (like disasters, price changes by Rome etc.) and they do keep the game fresh and you more involved but biggest issue with them is that player has very little influence over them and he should have more like for example a wasted opportunity in Caesar III is Oracle building which just boosts your standing with all Gods and increases desirability of area. Instead I'd add an option for it to be dedicated to one God and to have ability to predict certain disasters in advance from that God's domain (Oracle of Mars could predict for example any riot or enemy invasion years in advance and their strength etc.).

Don't know what you guys think about some of these rough ideas I have but I think that with some tweaking and good old balancing (not too much balancing though) it would improve any potential sequel tenfold.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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An interesting stack of ideas there Mr. Wall, but it kinda misses the point of the complaints I made.

I'm not complaining about the details of what's in the game nor what's not in the game, I'm complaining that what is in the game doesn't work. That the implementation of their idea was so utterly flawed that it verges on the criminal, either via incompetence or intention.

It doesn't matter what a game has in it. The idea that sphere's of influence are 'popamole' is complete bollocks that catfood made up from his own ass. The idea that random automatically makes a game 'harder' is complete bollocks that catfood has just made up from his own ass. There's no such thing as an ideal combination of mechanics that will create the ideal game, there's simply games that implement their ideas well and those that don't. There's simply games that are more challenging than others because the developers have spent more time tweaking their game to enhance challenges, not because the mechanics make them so. Even the idea that games have to be 'hard' is complete bollocks as well, space invaders was an extremely hard game, you just had to play the 'easy' levels first before you got to the 'hard' levels, because the only thing it needed to make it harder was to increase the speed of the spaceships, you get to a certain point in space invaders and quit because the game has become "ridiculous", not because any mechanics or game design have changed.

After getting to the third mission in Caesar 2 I've had more time to experience the implementation of their ideas in that game as well and I have to say, the developers do seem to have 'issues' with regards to secret information. They certainly have 'issues' with the player being allowed to fully manage their games with all variables known up-front and easily manipulatable. In Caesar 2, for example, they neglected to add a drop-down overlay map of Bathhouse coverage. You get drop-down overlays for entertainment, tax coverage, water, education and etc, but nothing for Bathhouses. For Bathhouses you have to click on individual houses to see if they're covered. A small point, but telling point. A contradiction in intent which shows a lack of 'completeness' in their mindset. That they don't care about rough edges.

But even more concerning than that is that when you have placed all your buildings around your houses and then looked through all of the overlays to make sure all the houses are covered, either from walkers or natural range, and they are, you then suddenly find that one house is levelling-up worse than another house. For no discernible reason. So you click on the house to doublecheck if it's missed something all the other houses are getting, and no, it's list of "what it's got covering it" is exactly the same as all the other houses and it has no minuses for being near undesirable properties. But it just has a lower land value than its neighbours. For no discernible reason. One assumes there must be a reason, but, for whatever reason, the developers don't want to share that information. Because they have 'issues'.

So while Caesar 2 provides evidence of dodgy game development, it doesn't yet appear to be actually broken, just a bit annoying. Caesar 3 was actually not very annoying at all in the department of hiding information, it was usually patently obvious how everything was working (once you'd experienced the game after the rather uninformative tutorials that is), it just had the misfortune of being utterly broken, because, like both games, the developers are terrible at applying the finishing touches to their games and smoothing out the rough edges.

Edit: oh yeah, and no-one likes random disasters in city builders. It's like having a forum troll in your game... which might help you guess what kind of person would suggest such a thing as being a 'good' feature.
 
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Ashery

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You know, I was going to put up another long post explaining the nuances of the game's mechanics (I've been out of town for a week), but I've realized something:

I'm talking to someone who didn't realize houses could be zoned two deep.

I'm talking to someone who misrepresented the idea that they were building housing blocks on a straight road.

I'm talking to someone who didn't read the tutorial pop-up that explained that entertainers walk from their building of origin to their respective entertainment venues.

And that's only scratching the surface.

So, fuck it.

Zones of influence are popamole because they directly encourage cookie cutter/idealized layouts. Yea, the same can be done with walkers, but walkers do allow the player more freedom in that respect. So long as the player actually understands the nuances of the mechanics.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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And I appear to be talking to someone WHO DOESN'T UNDERSTAND THE GAME WAS FUCKING BROKEN. AS IN A BUGGED-UP SACK OF SHIT. AS IN IT DIDN'T FUCKING WORK.

:retarded:

Zones of influence are popamole because they directly encourage cookie cutter/idealized layouts. Yea, the same can be done with walkers, but walkers do allow the player more freedom in that respect. So long as the player actually understands the nuances of the mechanics.

Fuck off you demented fanboy, whatever system you use there will develop ideal layouts, spastic. Walkrers do not add more freedom "in that regard" you blinkered fucking fanboy.

So long as the player understands the mechanics? YOU MEAN THE ONES THE GAME DOESN'T EXPLAIN TO YOU. YOU MEAN THE ONES YOU HAVE TO FIND OUT BY LISTENING TO PRETENTIOUS PRICKS ON INTERNET FORUMS. OR DID YOU MEAN THE ONES THAT WERE ACTUALLY BROKEN, AS IN THEY DIDN'T WORK, AS IN THEY WERE FUCKED-UP.

SO HOW LONG DID YOU WORK ON THESE GAMES? I HOPE YOU GOT A NICE HOUSE OUT OF IT.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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You know, I was going to put up another long post explaining the nuances of the game's mechanics (I've been out of town for a week), but I've realized something:

I'm talking to someone who didn't realize houses could be zoned two deep.

I'm talking to someone who misrepresented the idea that they were building housing blocks on a straight road.

I'm talking to someone who didn't read the tutorial pop-up that explained that entertainers walk from their building of origin to their respective entertainment venues.

And that's only scratching the surface.

So, fuck it.

Zones of influence are popamole because they directly encourage cookie cutter/idealized layouts. Yea, the same can be done with walkers, but walkers do allow the player more freedom in that respect. So long as the player actually understands the nuances of the mechanics.

I tell you what, I'll give you one last benefit of the doubt before writing you off as spastic that can't read and reply properly to this demented pile of verbal diareah.

1) you claim the game offers more variety of builds - and yet all you do is bleat on about straight roads - straight roads where all the buildings have to be in the right place. Youre calling me retarded because I haven't followed your pinpoint description of an ideal road layout. Please excuse me while I try to stop myself laughing myself to death.

2) I quit the game because it was BUGGING OUT and for no other reason - the bugs were with the bathhouse lady and the market traders, both of which have fuck all to do with your post.

3) games often have elements you have to figure out for youself. However, if the sole 'difficulty' of your game revolves around figuring out how the game works then that is lazy 'excuse' design. That is BAD design. I did not find the game 'difficult', I found the game UTTERLY RETARDED. In most of the things it did.

4) I did actually enjoy the concept. It did look like a nice game, except when it was being retarded. I enjoyed many aspects. But it was just so fucking retarded with fuck all to actually do other than manipulate walkers, which are a hilariously stupid idea in the first place.

5) In the previous game walkers ADDED to the sphere of influence of a building. They made the game easier while also adding AN ELEMENT of increased choice to building locations. HOWEVER, by removing all spheres if influnce from buildings and replacing them ALL with walkers, you revert back to a REDUCED choice in layout because of the exact reasons why you're bitching at me... Oh no, one building is in slightly the wrong place! All walkers are is mobile spheres of influence. Which COULD have been a good idea... except for the fact that they were made RANDOM. And it's the random which IRONICALLY jails you to one specific build-style.

6) The game has no inherent base in any form of reality whatsoever:

a) Ladies from bathhouses do not stalk random streets looking for punters to placate. People go to bathhouses. People ask where the bathhouse is when they move in and then don't forget that info.

b) houses do not collapse from a lack of furniture the second that individual house 'runs out'. They go and look for it. They do not wake up one day and see no new furniture in their house and decide to emigrate. Utterly uttrly utterly retarded.

c) Some buildings require training facilities while others do not. Actors have to be trained while priests do not. Gladiators have to be trained while doctors do not.

All of this crap is just pure abstract 'gamey' bullshit. And I repeat what was said earlier in the thread and earlier in this post, if your main point is "don't treat this game like a city builder" then why the fuck is it being sold as a city builder? If the only 'hard' bit of the game is figuring out something that should have been a part of the tutorial or part of that item's wiki entry, then that game is inherently "a bit stupid".

I could write more... but since you haven't even cottoned on to the fact that I quit because of bugs, and bugs alone, what the fuck is the point? You're quite obviouly so busy performing damage control that it's unlikely you'll be reading anything...
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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Yesterday I was thinking of posting to this thread about how much I was enjoying Caesar 2. Yesterday I had what can only be described as a purely blissful day of gaming.

But I thohght it would be stupid to bump this thread and hide this info on a thread about a broken game. Perhaps start a new thread. But no, it seems the fanboyism for C3 is so entrenched that I now have to keep replying to damage control.

What a shame. What a real fucking shame. C2 is so nice. So damn nice...
 

Ashery

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Double snip.

You think the game's broken because you're continuing to try and push a square peg through a round hole.

And no shit walkers give way to idealized layouts, I said that very thing, I just said walkers give the player freedom. Maybe "freedom" wasn't quite the best way to put it. "Dynamic" would have likely worked better. Regardless, the end result was the hope that the different mechanic would push players away from the formulaic city building that so cripples games like Caesar 2. Was it a complete success in that regard? No. But I do find myself building cities based around core mechanics rather than a set script, so it wasn't a failure, either.

To your other post:

1) You don't need straight roads, you need a lack of intersections between buildings that generate walkers and the houses that require services; you need to limit the choices walkers have to make in order to eliminate chance. Complaining that it limits design choices is like complaining that being unable to zone housing in SimCity 2k/3k more than three tiles from a road limits choices. It's a fundamental part of the game's design. You may not like it and you could argue that it's a poor design decision, but you can't bitch about it being broken when you've shown that you don't understand how to work with it.

2) The market "bug" is just generic text it displays whenever it runs out of goods, which will frequently happen if you're not running enough markets since they're not particularly efficient when it comes to gathering goods and distributing them. Bathhouse access dropped off because you expanded the road network and changed the four paths the walker would rotate through enough to prevent your houses from having consistent access.

3) I'd agree with your underlying statement. I'd even agree with it in respect to a certain aspect of C3 that you never bring up (It relates to the very hard difficulty setting). But it doesn't apply for the issues you state.

4) It only feels like that's all you do because you continually struggle with understanding how to manipulate walkers in a simple way: Eliminate choice and you eliminate the randomness.

5) Yes, routes are initially randomly determined, but there will be a rotation of four set paths so long as the road network the walker uses doesn't change (Ie they don't have to make another decision at a new intersection). It ultimately creates a different dynamic than spheres of influence, and once you actually understand how to work with it, is completely functional. Is it perfect? Not at all, particularly in C3 as Pharaoh showed how much improvement could be made with a few small additions. But it's a viable design decision.

6) No game ulimately has any real grounding in reality. They might try to model it, but even an absurdly complex game like Dwarf Fortress doesn't even come close to giving reality the justice it deserves.

Again, you're not posting about bugs. You're posting about what you think are bugs but are ultimately just you continuing to try and push a square peg through a round hole. C3 has genuine issues, some of which can be worked around with minimal issues (Limiting access to goods/services to prevent villas), others bog the game down to the point where I rarely load the game up (The one relating to the very hard difficulty setting), but nothing of what you posted relates to bugs.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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Yes you spastic, i even posted screenshots.

The whole reason I started losing it with the game is because I'd watch marketeers go back to their markets with a full supply and then nothing... read nothing showed up in their depot and zero... read zero items went to houses.

Precisely because i had spammed marketeers and food and pottery it didn't matter - that was already my fucking work around. And it worked fine for 15 game years. Then i look at the markets in the screenshot and they have fuck all in them.

I already know the game is bugged, it just wasn't game breaking. Seeing the markets all of a sudden with fuck all in them elevated it to game breaking, so i uninstalled.

Do you get it yet?

Do you understand what a bug is?

Will you please stop all this utter bullshit about nuance and hypocryical shite about greater build variety with less choice. I've already said, the system was ok in theory but just shite in practice bcause of the random - and hey what, the player base agrees. It would appear that in the supposedly good versions of this system the PROBLEM of random walkers was mitigated away. And no you spaz, spheres of influence are common in the genre because that's how real life works you spastic, not because it's 'popamole' bwhahaha. Of course games abstract, they all fucking do, but they're supposed to be based on some form of logic, you mong.

As for your patronising drivel about caesar2, i don't give a fuck if it's "a bit too repetative", its not like i'll be spending 200 hours on it is it. 15 territories at 3 to 4 hours a territory, game played. I don't play city builders like they're fucking 2000 hour strategy games lmao.

I've done 5 territories and i'm still figuring out new stuff, still new stuff to tweak for the next territory. If i get to 8 or 10 and it becomes same old same old then i wont care as i've nearly finished and will view it as a reward that i've learned how to beat it. Then i'll be onto the next game.

AND HOPING IT WORKS :roll:
 
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Ashery

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I saw the screenshots; that's how I know you just don't grasp how the game plays rather than there being genuine bugs.

I've never seen, let alone heard of, a market bug like you described in all of my eighteen years of playing C3. Combine that with your screenshots, and yea, I'm going to say it's a mistake on your end and not some brand new critical bug on a game that's been broken down and analyzed so much over nearly two decades.

I'm not sure where you're getting that the player base agrees with your analysis. Are there issues with walkers? Sure. Never have I said otherwise. The problem is that you insist that the walkers in C3 are outright broken. It's like complaining that FTL is too reliant on the RNG and that the game's broken because of it, despite the fact that the better players streak 20+ wins on hard while avoiding the overpowered starting ships.

Spheres of influence are fucking realistic? You mean one house won't have access to a school simply because it's located 200ft further down a road?

Fifteen territories at 3-4 hours was just too much for me. Congrats on getting more out of repetition, I guess. Maybe that's why this conversation keeps going on.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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I saw the screenshots; that's how I know you just don't grasp how the game plays rather than there being genuine bugs.

I've never seen, let alone heard of, a market bug like you described in all of my eighteen years of playing C3. Combine that with your screenshots, and yea, I'm going to say it's a mistake on your end and not some brand new critical bug on a game that's been broken down and analyzed so much over nearly two decades.

I don't give a shit if you've never seen the bug before, I can do no more than explain it AND PROVIDE THE FUCKING PICTURES. Yes, I did a brief search of bugs on this game and I'm not surprised you've never heard of it before, practically every thread on the internet mentioning bugs has at least three of you types on it blathering out all this horseshit at anyone who mentions a bug and the fuckers who mentioned the bug haven't a fucking clue how to respond.

I'm not sure where you're getting that the player base agrees with your analysis. Are there issues with walkers? Sure. Never have I said otherwise. The problem is that you insist that the walkers in C3 are outright broken. It's like complaining that FTL is too reliant on the RNG and that the game's broken because of it, despite the fact that the better players streak 20+ wins on hard while avoiding the overpowered starting ships.

No, it's like complaining the designers have completely lost grip on any form of reality and have just mashed a game together that's so utterly disjointed and spasticated that people need to spend hundreds of hours pretending they're playing a really deep game when, in reality, they're just perpetually working out ways to make the game work from zero information, and then patting themselves on the back for unravelling a clusterfuck.

Spheres of influence are fucking realistic? You mean one house won't have access to a school simply because it's located 200ft further down a road?

Funny, because when I made that criticism I got lectured about putting my buildings "in the right place". But oh no, as long as the building is sprouting a walking dice then suddenly it doesn't matter if the building is 50 feet away! Oh, such valid criticism, so relevant! But, yes, that's where the term 'abstract' comes from. You see, a local school will have only a certain amount of SPACE to put kids, class sizes will need to be kept to something approaching rational, unless you want your classroom to be the size of a football pitch. In which case, in big cities, yes, you do indeed get primary schools literally down every road not far from each other, each serving about 1,000-2,000 people (and that's in the modern age, let alone in the past when people could have 16 kids). What certainly doesn't happen is that schools get built and then 4 children run around the streets reminding everyone to send their kids to school; people usually find out where the school is and then send their kids to it, and they don't fucking forget where it is because kids stop running past their fucking house *multiple facepalms*

Fifteen territories at 3-4 hours was just too much for me. Congrats on getting more out of repetition, I guess. Maybe that's why this conversation keeps going on.

The conversation keeps going on because you're a blind fanboy. I'm sorry if you get bored by games that are so well made that you don't need to spend 100 hours of figuring out just what the developers were even thinking. I'm sorry that you get bored by games that are so coherent that you don't need 60 forum posts to even establish if something is even a bug or not. Maybe if you'd spent all those 18 years playing decent games instead of getting addicted to train wrecks you'd have a clue what I was talking about, but, as I said, people like you don't really give a shit what the game is, just so long as you can spend weeks of your life working out the exact walking pattern of a non-random random walker, in a game that's just some filler crap to tide you over to the next proper game, I guess you're happy...
 

KazikluBey

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The entire left side of town is now, obviously, collapsing. So I watch it for a minute to see what's going on. And what do I see? I see a market trader go to the warehouse to buy pottery! WTF? Did it notice me not looking at that side of town for too long and decide I needed to be punished for it? And it was at this point I uninstalled. There's either something incredibly fishy going on here or the game is, quite literally, broken (not the best screenshot, but you can just make out the trader's boy behind the schoolboy at the crossroads) (also, for people tempted to say "crossroads" there is a market trader at the end of each road, they have to walk down the road to get to anywhere else, the crossroads are NOT the issue, market traders are target-led and will always aim for the granary or warehouse):

YPM2a2R.png
This my guess from the info available. I would be interested in loading up the save file if you still have it.

Some of the rules governing market buyers:
Market buyers will prefer to fetch food over goods if there's none at their market.
Market buyers will prefer wheat to other food sources if available. (unfortunately not even the manual tells you this, although it does tell you wheat farms produce twice as much as other food sources (depending on climate), making them preferable anyway)
Market buyers can only fetch one type of good at a time.

Conjecture:
Your granary has come to consist mostly of fruit.

Conclusion:
The market buyers spend most of their time picking up only a unit or two of wheat at a time.

Solution:
Remove either fruit or wheat farms.
Remove and replace the granary to empty it of fruit if you went for wheat production.

Result:
Market buyers can fetch 8 units of food at a time and so will have time over to fetch pottery and other goods.

Lesson:
Only make additional food types available to luxury districts that need it.



As for the bath house on the right side of town and the discussion of intersections generally, it's not like the game doesn't tell you in the intro to the very first mission:
SGFoF3h.png


As for single-wide housing, in the first mission intro they also show double-wide housing:
qhaX29r.png

Plus, in the first mission as soon as a fire starts and gives you access to prefectures they tell you this:
sJcGagF.png

Clearly indicating the viability of double-wide housing, which is more space-efficient than single-file, which is important due to the walker ranges.

And a couple of other things in that long post.

Now, there are certainly important things the game doesn't tell you and when you run into trouble it does a poor job of telling you what the actual underlying problem is and how to rectify that. A number of the less obvious things are covered in the manual; sadly the manual also has a lot of flavour fluff and a couple of pieces of bad advice, primarily in the fluff. But the underlying mechanics and algorithms are rather simple, they work how they're supposed to and in combination create quite complex systems, the managing of which is what provides the fun for those who like the game. Yet you keep banging on about how the game is fundamentally broken because your suboptimal designs that don't take the game mechanics properly into account don't work well/aren't stable.

You simply seem to want to play a different game with different mechanics, which in the end it seems you did. :thumbsup:
 
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KazikluBey

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Oh, and as for other Roman themed city builders. Caesar 4 removed the random walkers entirely. Houses go to fetch their water and food, buildings spread their influence not in an area like C2 but along roads. I bought it and didn't really end up playing it much, but I don't remember why.

There's also CivCity: Rome. I don't remember any details other than a somewhat annoying house-moving mechanic once a house reached a certain development level.
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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Hi, first thing I did once I'd discovered that the GRANARY was accepting NON-GRAIN goods (LOL, lmfao, etc etc etc), was to prevent it from accepting those goods. So no, that has fuck all to do with the situation. Now, on to something called.... reality:

Thanks for the wonderful post explaining some random minutia from the game. However, I'd hate to think you wasted your time on something utterly pointless, so in the best interests of helping you out and doing a good turn I shall remind you, once again, for only about the 12th time now:

I quit because of bugs.

'k.

Hope that helped ;)

We logged that in our head yet? The game's uninstalled. I'm now playing a different game. The full description of the bug that tipped the scale can be found in a previous post and, since you just love working out stuff with zero information and hate things that are fully up-front about everything, I'll let you go looking for that post rather than repeating or linking it. Ooooh oh what fun you'll have, that will be just you're bag wont it. I look forward to your eventual reply where you acknowledge the bug. Tutty bye, till next time :roll:
 
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IncendiaryDevice

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But not simple enough for you it seems. Have you tried the game I linked to in my previous post?

For the 15th time, i quit because it was a bugged up sack of shit. What part of reading are you refusing to read?

I dont give a fuck what you link, nothing will change the fact that i quit because if bugs.

...spastic
 

KazikluBey

Cipher
Patron
Joined
Feb 10, 2007
Messages
784
PC RPG Website of the Year, 2015

Why? The guy has no idea what he's talking about. The city layouts show no understanding of the games, so no wonder he says his cities keep crashing and burning. He says all buildings in Caesar 2 had walkers (most had area coverage). He doesn't realize that yes you can indeed have roads pass under aqueducts in Caesar 3 and so goes off on a few minute long tangent on how stupid the game is for not allowing that.

Yet he says it's the game after Zeus he played the most?

There are legitimate criticisms, most of which we've already been over in this thread, I think.
 

Gepeu

Savant
Patron
Joined
Oct 16, 2016
Messages
986
This video is just embarrassing. Just wow. What a hack.
 

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