Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

The Crimson Diamond - inspired by The Colonel's Bequest

eviltentacle

Novice
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
7
She’s finished the game, it’s in the testing phase now and finishing off the intro art (yes that is a placeholder :)). It should be released this year.
The demo is easy but there are things in there you can miss. There are also at least 2 deaths in the demo I can think of. Apparently the game has a Laura Bow 2 style questionnaire at the end so while finishing it I guess will be easy, hopefully getting everything right and finding all the secrets will be harder.
 

Modron

Arcane
Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
10,206
Well it does seem like it's coming out this year, but probably after the second quarter since she is retiring the prologue in May: https://store.steampowered.com/news/app/1242790/view/4145072064645876759
The Crimson Diamond: Chapter 1 is retiring May 13, 2024!
Full game is releasing this year!

I'm excited to announce that the full game of The Crimson Diamond is launching this year! To minimize confusion, I will be retiring The Crimson Diamond: Chapter 1 from the Steam store on May 13, 2024. The demo will still be available on The Crimson Diamond's Steam store page!



Thank you for all of your reviews and feedback. I've read all of it and appreciate it very much. I hope you'll enjoy the full game (all seven chapters of it!) when it launches in 2024!

To keep up with developer updates, you can subscribe to my mailing list here: https://www.thecrimsondiamond.com/subscribe.html

To give feedback about The Crimson Diamond, contact: feedback@thecrimsondiamond.com

I also livestream game art development (no spoilers) on Twitch at 8pm Eastern on Tuesdays: www.twitch.tv/a_maplemystery and post the VODs on my Youtube channel: www.youtube.com/c/JuliaMinamata

I'm also on Twitter: twitter.com/JuliaMinamata

A big thanks to everyone, and best wishes!

-- Julia
 

Darkozric

Arbiter
Edgy
Joined
Jun 3, 2018
Messages
1,710
The art is brilliant in this game, and maximum respect for sticking with authentic EGA limitations.

Oh, and text parser!
Yes but what about gameplay and length? I see you're eager to take the visual bait, maximum respect only if the game turns out to be actually good.
 

Rincewind

Magister
Patron
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Messages
2,546
Location
down under
Codex+ Now Streaming!
The art is brilliant in this game, and maximum respect for sticking with authentic EGA limitations.

Oh, and text parser!
Yes but what about gameplay and length? I see you're eager to take the visual bait, maximum respect only if the game turns out to be actually good.
Yeah, I guess we'll have to try and see. But the graphics are spot-on, and that's like 30-50% of a good Sierra-style graphical adventure.
 

Morpheus Kitami

Liturgist
Joined
May 14, 2020
Messages
2,586
The art is brilliant in this game, and maximum respect for sticking with authentic EGA limitations.

Oh, and text parser!
Yes but what about gameplay and length? I see you're eager to take the visual bait, maximum respect only if the game turns out to be actually good.
Based on the author streaming some EGA games and seemingly sticking to walkthroughs a ton there, something tells me that the game is going to be lacking in that respect.
 

Darkozric

Arbiter
Edgy
Joined
Jun 3, 2018
Messages
1,710
Based on the author streaming some EGA games and seemingly sticking to walkthroughs a ton there, something tells me that the game is going to be lacking in that respect.
Yeah I've got the same impression, having a 30% or whatever percent of a sierra game is something that I'm not interested in.
 

El Presidente

Arcane
Joined
Nov 3, 2018
Messages
1,569
Location
Oval Office
The art is brilliant in this game, and maximum respect for sticking with authentic EGA limitations.

Oh, and text parser!
Yes but what about gameplay and length? I see you're eager to take the visual bait, maximum respect only if the game turns out to be actually good.
Based on the author streaming some EGA games and seemingly sticking to walkthroughs a ton there, something tells me that the game is going to be lacking in that respect.
:negative: Didn't know that, oh welp I still want to believe.
 

eviltentacle

Novice
Joined
Nov 3, 2019
Messages
7
The demo gives you a to-do list in your notebook which is EZ stuff, but there are a few things I know of that you can do beyond that - one is quite sneaky and a lot of people will miss. I noticed one or two other things have also been snuck in since the earlier demo that are missable. It gives me some hope that there will be a few puzzles in there besides the beautiful art.
 
Joined
Mar 15, 2014
Messages
696
The art is brilliant in this game, and maximum respect for sticking with authentic EGA limitations.
It is, no doubt about that. Only one thing: EGA games back in the day didn't use to show us the mixed surfaces (the dotted ones) as they were blurred into another shade of the main color they consisted of. It was a brillant trick used by graphic programers back then to give the player the impression of more colors than there actually were there (and more than were technically possible with EGA). CRT-screens did the magic and gave the games that blurred image which created these fake colors (Scummvm lets you actually emulate this effect with a special setting). By mimicking the dotted surfaces in a modern game this is missed. The games of the era were not intended to appear this way on the screen. I'd love if at least there was some kind of CRT-filter to play the game as it would have appeared back then.

Two examples (made with Scummvm):
Screenshot-2024-03-23-212148.png

Screenshot-2024-03-23-212844.png
 
Last edited:

Rincewind

Magister
Patron
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Messages
2,546
Location
down under
Codex+ Now Streaming!
Only one thing: EGA games back in the day didn't use to show us the mixed surfaces (the dotted ones) as they were blurred into another shade of the main color they consisted of. It was a brillant trick used by graphic programers back then to give the player the impression of more colors than there actually were there (and more than were technically possible with EGA).
Sorry but not true. I've researched this extensively when creating my authentic PC monitor emulation shaders for DOSBox Staging.

EGA monitors (and even CGA but to a lesser extent) were *tack sharp* as IBM PC monitors were designed for business applications first and foremost. The primary use case was staring at 80-column text and spreadsheets all day, and if you make 80-column text sharp at 640 pixels of horizontal resolution, pixels in 320 pixel wide modes will appear as quite distinct little blocks.

Consequently, checkerboard dither on EGA art was clearly visible, there was no blurring and blending going on. I can back this up with a collection of photos of real EGA monitors and you can check out my EGA shader examples on our website which are pretty good approximations of the EGA monitor look.

https://dosbox-staging.github.io/

If you think about it, 80-column text on 80s CRT TVs and lesser home computer monitors (which were basically small higher-quality TVs) was very hard to read and quite blurry. Such TVs blurred 320x200 checkerboard dither somewhat, especially via composite or RF input, but still not perfectly.

That's the reason why practically all home computers defaulted or only supported 40-column text. IBM's EGA monitors were digital (yeah, more than a decade before DVI!) and quite expensive, all in the interest of sharp 80-column text. An EGA monitor could cost more than your typical home computer.

I assure you that ScummVM feature is a fantasy setting and it's nothing how EGA games looked back in the day. Even my Philips CM8833-II (basically the same as the iconic Commodore 1084S) I used with my Amiga 500, which was less sharp than EGA monitors, displayed checkboard dither as distinct checkerboard patterns in Sierra ports. I did spend considerable time in Deluxe Paint pixeling, and on Amiga monitors you could indeed make dithering almost "melt away", but you had to use colours close to each other for that. That did not work with the very contrasty, by-the-numbers 16-colour CGA/low-res EGA palette.
 
Joined
Mar 15, 2014
Messages
696
Only one thing: EGA games back in the day didn't use to show us the mixed surfaces (the dotted ones) as they were blurred into another shade of the main color they consisted of. It was a brillant trick used by graphic programers back then to give the player the impression of more colors than there actually were there (and more than were technically possible with EGA).
Sorry but not true. I've researched this extensively when creating my authentic PC monitor emulation shaders for DOSBox Staging.

EGA monitors (and even CGA but to a lesser extent) were *tack sharp* as IBM PC monitors were designed for business applications first and foremost. The primary use case was staring at 80-column text and spreadsheets all day, and if you make 80-column text sharp at 640 pixels of horizontal resolution, pixels in 320 pixel wide modes will appear as quite distinct little blocks.

Consequently, checkerboard dither on EGA art was clearly visible, there was no blurring and blending going on. I can back this up with a collection of photos of real EGA monitors and you can check out my EGA shader examples on our website which are pretty good approximations of the EGA monitor look.

https://dosbox-staging.github.io/

If you think about it, 80-column text on 80s CRT TVs and lesser home computer monitors (which were basically small higher-quality TVs) was very hard to read and quite blurry. Such TVs blurred 320x200 checkerboard dither somewhat, especially via composite or RF input, but still not perfectly.

That's the reason why practically all home computers defaulted or only supported 40-column text. IBM's EGA monitors were digital (yeah, more than a decade before DVI!) and quite expensive, all in the interest of sharp 80-column text. An EGA monitor could cost more than your typical home computer.

I assure you that ScummVM feature is a fantasy setting and it's nothing how EGA games looked back in the day. Even my Philips CM8833-II (basically the same as the iconic Commodore 1084S) I used with my Amiga 500, which was less sharp than EGA monitors, displayed checkboard dither as distinct checkerboard patterns in Sierra ports. I did spend considerable time in Deluxe Paint pixeling, and on Amiga monitors you could indeed make dithering almost "melt away", but you had to use colours close to each other for that. That did not work with the very contrasty, by-the-numbers 16-colour CGA/low-res EGA palette.
No need for sorry! I always eager to learn and correct my rather halfbaked knowledge on these things. Thank you for taking the time to explain it indepth!
 

Rincewind

Magister
Patron
Joined
Feb 8, 2020
Messages
2,546
Location
down under
Codex+ Now Streaming!
For reference, actual photos of an EGA monitor in action. Zoom in to 100% magnification.

oB91PW3.png


36dLv8s.jpeg


MZxwX9E.png
 

AndyS

Augur
Joined
Sep 11, 2013
Messages
449
Yeah, I was going to say that I played all those Sierra games and the dithering was really obvious on my monitor. They were doing it to create extra shading in their images, but it certainly didn't get blurred into a solid image. If it had, I would have worried something was wrong with my monitor.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Back
Top Bottom