Putting the 'role' back in role-playing games since 2002.
Donate to Codex
Good Old Games
News Content Gallery About Donate Discord Contact
  • Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.

Google Stadia - "a game streaming service for everyone"

Fedora Master

Arcane
Patron
Edgy
Joined
Jun 28, 2017
Messages
17,271
I fucking love Google and their services. They're always so high quality and successful.
 

Venser

Erudite
Joined
Aug 8, 2015
Messages
1,428
Location
dm6

Scoop: Two hot games' secret Google connection​

Stephen Totilo

Video game screenshot of teenagers scared in the woods The Quarry. Screenshot: Supermassive, Take Two
Google was involved in the creation of two notable video games in the spotlight this month, before the downsizing of its Stadia gaming operation sent those projects elsewhere, two sources familiar with their development tell Axios.
Why it matters: The games’ Google connections help fill out a picture of what Stadia could have offered, if Google hadn’t abandoned its ambitions in 2021 to create a gaming platform to rival PlayStation and Xbox.
Details: Neither of the games — the well-reviewed horror adventure The Quarry, and comedic sci-fi game High on Life — has been officially associated with Stadia.
  • The Quarry, developed by Supermassive and published by Take Two Interactive, was released on June 10 for PC, PlayStation and Xbox.
  • High On Life, from Squanch Games and a team led by "Rick and Morty" co-creator Justin Roiland, was revealed during a Microsoft gaming showcase last week and is slated for an Xbox and PC release later this year.
  • But Axios sources say both games were projects that previously were being made for Google and presented as signature Stadia releases, meant to draw players to the streaming service.
What they’re saying: Reps for both games declined to directly answer Axios’ questions about the games’ Stadia roots.
  • Supermassive Games “was looking for a publishing partner as the project came to completion,” a rep for Take Two said of The Quarry, noting the publisher was proud to help release the game.
  • Google had announced a partnership with Supermassive in 2020, but neither party had shared details on what they were making. When The Quarry was announced by Supermassive and Take Two this past March, Stadia fans were left guessing if it was the product of that Google partnership.
  • A spokesperson for Squanch offered less context and simply stated which platform High on Life is slated for.
  • A Google rep did not reply to a request for comment.
Catch up quick: Google announced Stadia in March 2019, attempting to shake up the games industry with a device-free cloud-based platform and a line-up of games from a mix of outside studios and internal teams staffed by veteran game designers.
The big picture: In the super-secret video game industry, projects can be in development for years at major companies, with no stakeholders so much as acknowledging them.
  • When a publisher or platform provider begins cutting projects, those games can be lost, or sometimes reemerge in unexpected ways.
https://www.axios.com/2022/06/17/the-quarry-high-on-life-google-stadia
 

Venser

Erudite
Joined
Aug 8, 2015
Messages
1,428
Location
dm6

Scoop: Two hot games' secret Google connection​

Stephen Totilo

Video game screenshot of teenagers scared in the woods The Quarry. Screenshot: Supermassive, Take Two
Google was involved in the creation of two notable video games in the spotlight this month, before the downsizing of its Stadia gaming operation sent those projects elsewhere, two sources familiar with their development tell Axios.
Why it matters: The games’ Google connections help fill out a picture of what Stadia could have offered, if Google hadn’t abandoned its ambitions in 2021 to create a gaming platform to rival PlayStation and Xbox.
Details: Neither of the games — the well-reviewed horror adventure The Quarry, and comedic sci-fi game High on Life — has been officially associated with Stadia.
  • The Quarry, developed by Supermassive and published by Take Two Interactive, was released on June 10 for PC, PlayStation and Xbox.
  • High On Life, from Squanch Games and a team led by "Rick and Morty" co-creator Justin Roiland, was revealed during a Microsoft gaming showcase last week and is slated for an Xbox and PC release later this year.
  • But Axios sources say both games were projects that previously were being made for Google and presented as signature Stadia releases, meant to draw players to the streaming service.
What they’re saying: Reps for both games declined to directly answer Axios’ questions about the games’ Stadia roots.
  • Supermassive Games “was looking for a publishing partner as the project came to completion,” a rep for Take Two said of The Quarry, noting the publisher was proud to help release the game.
  • Google had announced a partnership with Supermassive in 2020, but neither party had shared details on what they were making. When The Quarry was announced by Supermassive and Take Two this past March, Stadia fans were left guessing if it was the product of that Google partnership.
  • A spokesperson for Squanch offered less context and simply stated which platform High on Life is slated for.
  • A Google rep did not reply to a request for comment.
Catch up quick: Google announced Stadia in March 2019, attempting to shake up the games industry with a device-free cloud-based platform and a line-up of games from a mix of outside studios and internal teams staffed by veteran game designers.
The big picture: In the super-secret video game industry, projects can be in development for years at major companies, with no stakeholders so much as acknowledging them.
  • When a publisher or platform provider begins cutting projects, those games can be lost, or sometimes reemerge in unexpected ways.

https://www.axios.com/2022/06/17/the-quarry-high-on-life-google-stadia
 

Duraframe300

Arcane
Joined
Dec 21, 2010
Messages
5,899
So stadia collapsed? How shocking. Does anything run through stadia?
It still exists, but nobody cares.

The games offered through its subscription don't stress hardware at all, so you're better off buying them normally. They also have zero chance against Microsoft and Sony, because those both offer bigger libraries and games you normally can't get on PC or you might actually have a pc not strong enough to play them at the same quality. (XBOX already as they offer XBOX Series X versions and Sony in the future with PS5 versions of games).

Stadia has no market and is just slowly dying.
 

Modron

Arcane
Joined
May 5, 2012
Messages
5,242
Besides Amazon's Luna has it beat since it has both Judgment games. Only reason to ever use a game streaming service since you can't get those elsewhere on pc.
 

As an Amazon Associate, rpgcodex.net earns from qualifying purchases.
Top Bottom