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Jeff Vogel Soapbox Thread

Mustawd

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Joined
Jan 10, 2015
Messages
12,678
Dude is like 50 ppl. Wtf.

Spiderweb Software was founded in 1994, which is ~28 years ago. Dude was probably 22-25 when he started it. So he's probably around 50-53.
 

Hobo Elf

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Nocturne dumpster
So.... if codex opinion is anything to go by, he'll be working for a while.

Didn't he say that Queen's Wish will be his last Original series?

This. I'm positive that Vogel posted his pipeline leading up to his retirement. To be honest there wasn't much to look forward to apart from the Geneforge remakes. Queen's Wish was going to be his last new original series and after that he was going to focus on remaking Geneforge and Avadon (lol).
 

Whisper

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Vatnik
Joined
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Messages
4,070
"There are too many video games"

Common, like 99% of them are shit, either anime or pixel-graphics "made in an hour of free time".
 

Grauken

Blobbers forever
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Messages
8,979
He says "There are too many video games" I hear "There's too much competition"

Why does Vogel hate capitalism?
 

Bastardchops

Savant
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Nov 4, 2015
Messages
497
Does anyone know if Jeff Vogel is going to be releasing the Exile series with VR support?
 

Lord_Potato

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Glory to Ukraine
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Free City of Warsaw
Yeah, he looks a bit older. Always thought he's around 60. I wonder how long he will be working - maybe until he's actually 60? 2019 Queen's Wish, 2021 Geneforge, 2022 Queen's Wish 2, 2024 Geneforge 2, 2025 Queen's Wish 3 and then the rest of the Geneforge games. Did he say something about other games he wants to remake?

Although he's critized widely on the codex as a developer without flashy graphics he always gave me hope! Still impressed how long his studio has been going. +M

When he finishes with Geneforge he'll have time to remake the Avadons. I doubt he would return to Nethergate, he seems to be a bit butthurt about its poor sales back in the day.
 

Lord_Potato

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Does anyone know if Jeff Vogel is going to be releasing the Exile series with VR support?

Imagine having to suffer Vogel's artistic taste in VR!
 

Bastardchops

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baud

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Septentrion
RPG Wokedex Strap Yourselves In Pathfinder: Kingmaker
would "remaking" avadon be anything more than a cash-grab? There doesn't seem to be much difference between that trilogy and his latest games, so there wouldn't be much to change graphic-wise and it's not as if the remake would be ported on other platforms
 

KeighnMcDeath

RPG Codex Boomer
Joined
Nov 23, 2016
Messages
7,439
Each game needs a side by side by side... dissection. Queen's wish was made the way it was so it can be remade in the future. If he used solid QOL and suggestions by the fans he couldn't keep the remake factory going.
 
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Tavernking

Don't believe his lies
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This. I'm positive that Vogel posted his pipeline leading up to his retirement. To be honest there wasn't much to look forward to apart from the Geneforge remakes. Queen's Wish was going to be his last new original series and after that he was going to focus on remaking Geneforge and Avadon (lol).

Where did you hear that he plans to remake Avadon?
 

Nifft Batuff

Cipher
Joined
Nov 14, 2018
Messages
2,282
There will be also several phases of re-remakes. In the next phase the games will be remade as 3D open-worlds. In the next-next phase the games will be remade in pixel art.
 

Hobo Elf

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Messages
13,254
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Nocturne dumpster
This. I'm positive that Vogel posted his pipeline leading up to his retirement. To be honest there wasn't much to look forward to apart from the Geneforge remakes. Queen's Wish was going to be his last new original series and after that he was going to focus on remaking Geneforge and Avadon (lol).

Where did you hear that he plans to remake Avadon?
You're asking too late I'm afraid. It has been a while since I read it and I can't recall where it was anymore.
 

Contagium

Learned
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390
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The most Vogel thing he could possibly say:

Screenshot_20220327-215345-964.png
 

Alienman

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Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2
However, you are meant to play it with a constant bombardment of player messages and also doing web research to figure it out.

Not sure I agree with this.
 

Infinitron

I post news
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RPG Wokedex Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Kingmaker
https://bottomfeeder.substack.com/p/video-game-thoughts-bonus-bag-1

Video Game Thoughts Bonus Bag #1
A lot of fun little things.


Trailer and official announcement coming soon.

Alas, it has been a long time since I updated this blog. This is mainly because of doing a huge amount of development, bug fixing, and PR for our next game, Queen's Wish 2: The Tormentor.

Elden Ring hasn't helped much either.

I'll get into writing again soon, but for now a few stray thoughts.

1. Elden Ring is Undeniable

Elden Ring is a huge success. It's sold a bajillion copies. It got good reviews. (Meaningless!) Based on Steam achievement percentages, players are engaging with this game to an wild extent. (Not meaningless!) It's big news.

I'll write a big thing about it eventually, because how can you not?

A title like Elden Ring is very useful for people who care about video games because it's a valuable reality check. Nobody has worse ideas about video game design than fussy video game designers (myself included), and people who write about games are generally free to say all kinds of nonsense without fear of contradiction.

A massive success like Elden Ring gives a reality check. It should what people actually want and what actually works out in the wild.

Turns out, people want to be made to throw themselves off a cliff to enter the tutorial. Who knew?

I'll say a lot more about this once I've finished the game. All I'll say for now is that we have all been given a brief, blissful respite from "Sure, video games are an art and artists are free to express themselves however they want, but if your game doesn't have an Easy difficulty setting you are a Bad Person!" discourse.


Just beat this boss. All I needed to do was be overleveled and use every broken ability available to me. I am old and bad at games.
2. Inscryption is Terrific

There's this indie game called Inscryption. It's a roguelike deck builder, like Slay the Spire. At least, it starts like that, and then it becomes something totally wild. It won a bunch of awards recently.

I recommend it very highly. Go into it as blind as possible.

It is a truly individual work, clearly the the product of a strong artistic voice voice. Games like this are where indie games shine brightest.

3. Writing About Gloom and Despair

I'm spending a lot of time thinking about these questions:

Suppose a young person wants to write video games for a living. When is it good to encourage him or her?

Someone wants to quit a job to write indie games for a living. How do you tell when this is a good idea?

You've been trying to make art for a living for a while and not getting anywhere. How do you know when it's time to quit?

People don't talk about these questions very often. You can kind of see why. It's a bummer. GDC will never, ever accept a talk on these topics. And yet, they are important questions. A life in art isn't for everyone.

I said a few things recently that got other developers a bit riled up. A worrying number of people told me recently that the answer is always to make games, more games, more more games, don't think about it, just make games, and I don't agree with this.

The thing is, the world right now is in a period of undeniable economic disruption. Our luxury entertainment good industry is overproducing and overextended. The time to be thinking about these questions is now. I’m not asking them about you. I’m asking them about MYSELF.

If writing games in your spare time helps you get through the day, go for it, but don't pretend there's unmet demand. I loved Inscryption, but if it never existed there'd still be 50000 other games to play.

I haven't written a blog post about it yet, because it's a hard question. I'm just saying for not that it IS a question, and you shouldn't be ashamed of thinking about it.


I still have my copy of this I got in 1980. Ran it for my friends. Peak geek experience.

4. Old-School D&D

I've spent a while helping run a 2nd Edition Dungeons & Dragons campaign, like D&D from the 1980s. I really love it. Two thoughts about it:

First. Once you get good and are used to the THAC0 system, the game goes very fast. It's easy to do 10 or 12 fights in a night if people pay attention. For me, newer D&D plays very slowly.

Second. In old D&D, it was expected that characters die a lot. In the old days, we lost characters and rolled new ones all the time. I really prefer it. It keeps the game fresh, it adds excitement, and, as Game of Thrones taught us, unexpected death leads to interesting storytelling.

Yet, I think I'm out of date on this one. New D&D (5th edition) makes death rare and difficult, and this edition is very popular. I think this is just a way in which I've been left behind. Still, being able to sit around the table and eat pizza and rock it like I did as a teenager has been terrific.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2018
Messages
42,684
Yet, I think I'm out of date on this one. New D&D (5th edition) makes death rare and difficult, and this edition is very popular. I think this is just a way in which I've been left behind.
"Very popular"

When I was a wee lad, the recommended player size for many tabletop modules was typically somewhere between 8 and 10, with some going up to 15 players recommended. Before my time, modules typically didn't have any recommended size -- instead the rules recommended 1 DM per 20 players! Now it's 2-5, despite it being played largely online.
Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
:avatard:
 

Tyranicon

A Memory of Eternity
Developer
Joined
Oct 7, 2019
Messages
2,352
Yet, I think I'm out of date on this one. New D&D (5th edition) makes death rare and difficult, and this edition is very popular. I think this is just a way in which I've been left behind.
"Very popular"

When I was a wee lad, the recommended player size for many tabletop modules was typically somewhere between 8 and 10, with some going up to 15 players recommended. Before my time, modules typically didn't have any recommended size -- instead the rules recommended 1 DM per 20 players! Now it's 2-5, despite it being played largely online.
Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.
:avatard:

5e is mechanically more forgiving than 3.5, but fewer deaths is usually due to modern tabletop culture. Tables full of grizzled fat, veteran old, dnd players tend to be highly streamlined wargaming sessions. These days, most younger dnd groups revolve around donut steel OCs that have pages of backstory and do absolutely retarded things that no DM in their right mind would allow. Back in the day we would've just called these people cringelords and kicked them out of the house.

Also explains for trimming down the party size to 4-6. Imagine 15 players all trying to shout over each other for who has the best and most unique characters. There's even non-combat campaigns... at which point I really have to question why you would even use the 5e framework instead of something like Blades in the Dark.
 

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