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Wasteland What puts you off the most about Wasteland 3?

I'm most annoyed by


  • Total voters
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Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
I'm most annoyed by the stupid "lol we're FUNNY because it's FUN" characters and overall style.
I hate that!
Followed by their treatment of the Codex und multiplayer.
Backed nonetheless. +M
 

Hobo Elf

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[ x ] Other (Brian Fargo / InExile)

I think he's a scummy guy who saw a chance to exploit starving cRPG nerds one more time to give him the boost he needed to break into the same level of mainstream that Obsidian has dominated for the past decade with their mediocrity. With Wasteland 3 they just dropped the facade of being a studio in the old school RPG business, although that was pretty apparent when you looked at how Wasteland 2 turned out and how Numenera has been shaping up. They're just another crappy studio who have nothing to offer in the way of quality.
 

anus_pounder

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As I mentioned elsewhere, I think WL2 was a boring piece of unoptimized bland junk but WL2:DC was a solid game.
I'm not retarded enough to support a multimillion dollar company through crowdfunding, fuck off. Their business model is shit so I'll wait a few years and get the DC:GOTY:DORITO edition in a shovelware batch sale.
The art looks a bit better, wonder if they fixed the horrible camera angle.

I actually want a MP campaign I can play with my friend so that sounds good. Haven't been following the game too much otherwise.

:D
 

l3loodAngel

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Alll of the above.

Other: I don't like the grafics. Yeah they are top tier quality and massive improvement from shovelwareland 2 but all the screens are overly busy with detail, makes it a pain to look at. Those people should be tied down and made to stare at Fallout/2 screenshots until they get it.
They might die first and hidding bodies might cause Fargo inconvenience.
 

Iznaliu

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The thing that annoys me the most is InXile's basic lack of integrity and competence. TTON's development has been such a farce, with so many broken promises, delays, and mistakes (changing the PC portrait ~10 times? seriously?) that I am very hesitant to support another of Brian Fargo's turds, especially when he has such a history of mismanagement and running companies into the ground. Fargo seems to have no idea who he is selling his games to, simultaneously courting AAA-loving casuals and RPG fanatics. Whether this is incompetence or malice is still up for debate, but it is more than likely a toxic mixture of both.
 

deama

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Fargo was the boss of interplay back in the day right? How'd they produce those games with him around? Or was he just better back then?
 

Wayward Son

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I think it was him being younger and slightly more idealistic/less attached to making the biggest buck possible and having the devs at Interplay also would have helped
 

Severian Silk

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I haven't played an InXile game yet. Am waiting for deep sales/discounts, which haven't happened yet.
 

deama

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I genuinely wonder if Fargo cares. Maybe he's just sitting somewhere in a corner, reading all this RPG codex stuff and sobbing, trying to understand what went wrong.
 

Roguey

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Fargo was the boss of interplay back in the day right? How'd they produce those games with him around? Or was he just better back then?

By the time the mid/late 90s had rolled around, he had pretty much entirely tuned out to what was happening at the company.
 

deama

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Fargo was the boss of interplay back in the day right? How'd they produce those games with him around? Or was he just better back then?

By the time the mid/late 90s had rolled around, he had pretty much entirely tuned out to what was happening at the company.
So he was just smoking a cigar in the background?
 

Deleted Member 16721

Guest
I am interested in Wasteland 3, actually. Wasteland 2 from the short amount I played was a competent old-school RPG that earned the old-school title. I think with Kickstarter RPGs and all these great games we are a bit spoiled or something.

I think W3 will be good for co-op. I don't care if you flamethrow this post, D:OS was a fun RPG to co-op through. It was epic, huge scope, turn-based and resembled a stat-heavy old-school RPG. W2 was similar, and W3 adds co-op. While I'm a bit disappointed that W3 is going to be on a much smaller scope, it will still be one of the few modern CRPGs that features co-op on PC.
 

Wayward Son

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I haven't played an InXile game yet. Am waiting for deep sales/discounts, which haven't happened yet.
Played Wastelan 2 during a free weekend once. Got bored within half an hour. Not upset, not angry, but just bored. I think it's the only game to ever make me feel that sort of boredom.
Edit: And I like the first Wasteland
 

Iznaliu

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Played Wastelan 2 during a free weekend once. Got bored within half an hour. Not upset, not angry, but just bored. I think it's the only game to ever make me feel that sort of boredom.

Took me only 10 minutes.
 

Roguey

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Infinitron

sBwM7mz.png


http://archive.nma-fallout.com/article.php?id=60786
The first real blow to my love of the company came during an all-hands company meeting. Burger Bill and I stood in the doorway and looked at the mass of people gathered. Interplay was expanding exponentially; so large that after this meeting, they would be held in the outdoor atrium. Bill and I had shipped 10th Anniversary only a few months earlier. Brian Fargo addressed the crowd and told everyone that how well the company was doing. But, he especially wanted to point out that the 10th Anniversary was a huge seller, responsible for 60% of the company's sales that quarter. Bill and I stood proud. Brian continued by saying that the 10th Anniversary project wouldn't have been possible if it wasn't for the dedication and hard work of two people. Burger and I grinned in anticipation. Brian continued, thanking two of the marketing ladies who helped to distribute the product. Burger and I stood and gaped. Not to belittle the job of marketing, but after scavenging the code, rewriting executables, creating installers, laboriously digitizing the manuals, for ten whole games, all under a massive crunch, I felt as if I was kicked in the man-bits.

Long before I ever heard the term "Jump the Shark", I began to see some warning signs of Interplay's continued success. I sensed a change in the management. There was a shift from a passion for game making, to a desire to make Hollywood-style cinema. We changed from the old adage of "Shoot for the moon. Here's a nickel." to "How can we make this experience more like watching a movie." It began with Stonekeep (which started as a throwback to the old Bard's Tale, but became a nightmare of "cinematic experience"), and exploded with the Sim-CD series (Interplay's remakes of SimCity, SimAnt, and SimEarth in CD-ROM format with lots of movies) and the horror show that was "Cyberhood" (an interactive movie that became a black hole of funds.)

I remember one producer summit when we first saw the film footage shot for Sim City CD. The idea was that you could click on buildings and see a movie of the people inside living their lives. They were 30 second clips of people watching TV, or sleeping in bed, or doing aerobics, or eating cereal. And there were dozens of these clips; the most boring and mundane things you can imagine. Immediately after seeing this footage, we learned that it cost over a million dollars to film, and there was more filming to do. Considering that most of the games in production had a sub 100K budget, I (and many of the producers there) about had aneurisms. All it took was for this one game to be a train wreck, and the whole company suffers, or even dies.

Had Brian been paying attention, he wouldn't have snubbed his employees or allowed that one title's budget to balloon up so high as to completely destroy them if it bombed.
 

Infinitron

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Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Rogue Well if you're saying him paying more attention would have been good that's a rather different thing from the stupid posts ITT.

lol at the idea that the former CEO of a top publisher cared less about the mass market back then than he does now
 
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Roguey

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Rogue Well if you're saying him paying more attention would have been good that's a rather different thing from the stupid posts ITT.

lol at the idea that the one-time CEO of a top publisher cared less about the mass market back then than he does now

I'm saying he personally didn't have much effect on quality one way or another other than when some meddling on his part would have either been beneficial or detrimental.
 

Fairfax

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Infinitron

sBwM7mz.png


http://archive.nma-fallout.com/article.php?id=60786
The first real blow to my love of the company came during an all-hands company meeting. Burger Bill and I stood in the doorway and looked at the mass of people gathered. Interplay was expanding exponentially; so large that after this meeting, they would be held in the outdoor atrium. Bill and I had shipped 10th Anniversary only a few months earlier. Brian Fargo addressed the crowd and told everyone that how well the company was doing. But, he especially wanted to point out that the 10th Anniversary was a huge seller, responsible for 60% of the company's sales that quarter. Bill and I stood proud. Brian continued by saying that the 10th Anniversary project wouldn't have been possible if it wasn't for the dedication and hard work of two people. Burger and I grinned in anticipation. Brian continued, thanking two of the marketing ladies who helped to distribute the product. Burger and I stood and gaped. Not to belittle the job of marketing, but after scavenging the code, rewriting executables, creating installers, laboriously digitizing the manuals, for ten whole games, all under a massive crunch, I felt as if I was kicked in the man-bits.

Long before I ever heard the term "Jump the Shark", I began to see some warning signs of Interplay's continued success. I sensed a change in the management. There was a shift from a passion for game making, to a desire to make Hollywood-style cinema. We changed from the old adage of "Shoot for the moon. Here's a nickel." to "How can we make this experience more like watching a movie." It began with Stonekeep (which started as a throwback to the old Bard's Tale, but became a nightmare of "cinematic experience"), and exploded with the Sim-CD series (Interplay's remakes of SimCity, SimAnt, and SimEarth in CD-ROM format with lots of movies) and the horror show that was "Cyberhood" (an interactive movie that became a black hole of funds.)

I remember one producer summit when we first saw the film footage shot for Sim City CD. The idea was that you could click on buildings and see a movie of the people inside living their lives. They were 30 second clips of people watching TV, or sleeping in bed, or doing aerobics, or eating cereal. And there were dozens of these clips; the most boring and mundane things you can imagine. Immediately after seeing this footage, we learned that it cost over a million dollars to film, and there was more filming to do. Considering that most of the games in production had a sub 100K budget, I (and many of the producers there) about had aneurisms. All it took was for this one game to be a train wreck, and the whole company suffers, or even dies.

Had Brian been paying attention, he wouldn't have snubbed his employees or allowed that one title's budget to balloon up so high as to completely destroy them if it bombed.
I'm not one to defend Brian Fargo, but in Tim Cain's case he didn't have much choice. In order to please Cain, he would've had to undermine Feargus' authority and allow the FO2 team to stand out with special treatment. Royalty-based bonuses would've made it even worse, because that's a financial type of special treatment that would've set a risky and costly precedent. That doesn't mean Tim Cain was wrong, though. I imagine he was rightfully frustrated with the fact Fallout was a success without Black Isle, and now Black Isle, led by a 27yo with little experience, was taking over and messing with it.
 
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Saduj

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lol at the idea that the former CEO of a top publisher cared less about the mass market back then than he does now

Isn't that what this is saying: "I began to see some warning signs of Interplay's continued success. I sensed a change in the management. There was a shift from a passion for game making, to a desire to make Hollywood-style cinema. We changed from the old adage of "Shoot for the moon. Here's a nickel." to "How can we make this experience more like watching a movie." It began with Stonekeep (which started as a throwback to the old Bard's Tale, but became a nightmare of "cinematic experience"), and exploded with the Sim-CD series (Interplay's remakes of SimCity, SimAnt, and SimEarth in CD-ROM format with lots of movies) and the horror show that was "Cyberhood" (an interactive movie that became a black hole of funds.)"

Not saying he never cared about making money. But when you're younger, it is easier to believe that not deviating from a specific vision will result in a great game and the money will naturally follow. After experiencing some failures, it is easy to fall into the trap of looking at what is currently trendy.
 

Infinitron

I post news
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Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
Those changes happened before Fallout, Planescape and the rest were made. And the reason some of the recent posts ITT are dumb is that all of those Black Isle RPGs were substantially simpler and more mass market-friendly than inXile's only released RPG Wasteland 2, and stuffed with voice-acted talking heads and prerendered 3D cutscenes.
 

FeelTheRads

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And the reason some of the recent posts ITT are dumb is that all of those Black Isle RPGs were substantially simpler

In what? They were certainly lighter is turd collection.

Edit:

and stuffed with voice-acted talking heads and prerendered 3D cutscenes.

Interplay was a big publisher, they could afford or at least they were expected to have stuff like this.
inXile on the other hand is wasting the little money they have and cutting content just to add some shitty voice acting. I think that pretty much shows how much of a AAA wannabe they are.
 
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Mustawd

Guest
Let's not forget console release for a fucking narrative, turn based RPG. Who are these guys trying to fool? I guess themselves into thinking they're AAA...
 

nikolokolus

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Wasteland 2 was a competent enough game, but after 30+ hours I dropped it and just can't make myself go back to it. And while I find many of the design goals of W3 questionable, and the PR debacle with the Codex isn't a great look, it's the string of unreleased games and then going back to crowd-funding that really made me balk. It's not too hard to read between the lines and conclude that the funds from these kickstarters are just funding the Numanuma game and that Fargo is betting he can make enough revenue from its sales to fund Bard's Tale and then hope that there's enough money from that game to fund part of W3. In short it just felt like a risky investment.
 

hivemind

Guest
because w2 was complete shit

however I respect Fargo for being an elder kikemaster able to scam gullible retards not once, not twice, BUT THREE TIMES :salute::salute::salute:
 

Roguey

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because w2 was complete shit

however I respect Fargo for being an elder kikemaster able to scam gullible retards not once, not twice, BUT THREE TIMES :salute::salute::salute:

Four times. Wasteland 2, Torment, Bard's Tale, Wasteland 3.
 

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