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CDPR Group update - 5 Witcher games, Cyberpunk 2077 sequel and new IP in production.

Hellraiser

Arcane
Joined
Apr 22, 2007
Messages
11,387
Location
Danzig, Potato-Hitman Commonwealth
dunno what they said but stock took a dive
IT stock is mostly about increased revenue forecasts and hype. For example, I closely follow Adobe stock and it's up 58% this year solely because of Firefly which atm barely makes a dent in Adobe's income.
Read: it's a casino.
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,765
dunno what they said but stock took a dive
IT stock is mostly about increased revenue forecasts and hype. For example, I closely follow Adobe stock and it's up 58% this year solely because of Firefly which atm barely makes a dent in Adobe's income.
Read: it's a casino.
my comment is around people with money sentiment around dlc release. Basically all good will is gone as stock price is back to where it was pre phantom liberty announcements
 

Frozen

Arcane
Joined
Jan 1, 2014
Messages
8,402
eccdd9acfadc36bcc70b.jpg

This is interesting - sales of CDPR games by region. US and Europe are equally important markets, with Asia somewhat behind. Perhaps they need Witcher 3 playable on mobile phones.

Who would have thought niggers have such good taste in games.
 

cyborgboy95

News Cyborg
Joined
Aug 24, 2019
Messages
2,793
Nice analyst.

Cyberpunk 2077's redemption is complete, but the future remains murky for CD Projekt

By Robin Valentine
published 6 days ago
Despite a wide slate of games in development, it feels like the company's starting over from scratch.
V looking afraid or confused and pointing to herself in Cyberpunk 2077.

(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

It's official: Cyberpunk 2077's redemption arc is complete. It feels like after three years of flagellation, CD Projekt can finally move on. But I can't help but think the company's future is still murky.
The Witcher 3 was a masterpiece, firmly establishing CDP's original studio, CD Projekt Red, as one of the best RPG development teams of all time. It felt like the beginning of a shining new era for the company—but it was also the end of The Witcher. With Geralt's story finished so completely that we even got to see him retire to a vineyard in the south of France, it was time for something new.
After an eight year wait, we got that, in the form of Cyberpunk 2077—but its launch was such a debacle that the studio had to spend years focused just on fixing both the game and its own tattered reputation. Though 2.0 has successfully turned the game into something closer to players' original expectations, it'll always be remembered as a disaster first and a good RPG second.
That leaves CDP in the unenviable position of having two core brands that are both pretty difficult to build a future for.
With The Witcher, the company is essentially starting over again on hard mode, needing to develop a new cast of characters and hoping they can resonate as strongly as some of the most beloved RPG protagonists ever, drawn from a beloved book series. How strong is people's affection for that world outside of their love of Geralt, Ciri, and pals? CDP's going to have to find out.

The Witcher


(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

And though Cyberpunk 2077's story has only just begun, any sequel will be arriving under a weighty shadow. Any bugs or flaws will be judged twice as harshly; but any reduction in ambition or scope will be seen as a step backwards. The first game was the victim of one of the most intense hype trains we've ever seen, but its follow-up may have an even more difficult time pleasing its audience.
Faced with those two quandaries, I think I'd be regrouping and taking cautious steps. Instead, CDP has expanded with multiple new studios, and announced a huge slate of projects, all so early in development they only have codenames. Let's run them down:

Project Polaris (The Witcher)​

Developer: CD Projekt Red
A full Witcher sequel from the original studio, described as the start of a new trilogy.

Project Orion (Cyberpunk 2077)​

Developer: CD Projekt Red North America, CD Projekt Red Vancouver
The task of making a sequel to Cyberpunk 2077 falls to the new Boston and Vancouver studios.

Project Sirius (The Witcher)​

Developer: The Molasses Flood
A spin-off project from a small studio CDP gobbled up in 2021, previously known mainly for modest survival game The Flame in the Flood.

Cyberpunk 2077 "live action project"​

Developer: Anonymous Content
Is it a TV show? Is it a film? All we know is it will tell "a brand new story" in Night City, though production company Anonymous Content has a good track record.

Project Canis Majoris (The Witcher)​

Developer: Fool's Theory
A remake of the first Witcher game, developed by an external studio but with "CDP's full creative supervision".

Project Hadar​

Developer: CD Projekt Red
A brand new IP, being built from scratch at CDP's original studio alongside Project Polaris. Concept work began in 2021, but even now it seems like it's still at the world-building stage.
Cyberpunk 2077 character Johnny Silverhand with arms crossed looks away from the camera and smiles

(Image credit: Tyler C. / CD Projekt)
That's a lot of projects for any company to spin-up at once, and almost all of them give reason for healthy scepticism. The Cyberpunk 2077 sequel in the hands of the untested US studios; the original Warsaw studio juggling both a new take on The Witcher and creating an entirely new series; a Witcher spin-off that's already been through development troubles before we've even learned its name; a full remake of the first game in the hands of a largely unknown outside developer that's never attempted anything of that scale before. There are no sure bets here.
"Whenever you consider us, you think of us as game developers. That's true but it's not the full truth," said chief commercial officer Michal Nowakowski at an investor's presentation earlier this month. "We want to be popular culture developers."
I get it, every company wants to be a multimedia empire these days, and with the success of projects like the Edgerunners anime and the Witcher TV series (recent casting drama aside), I can understand why CDP would be feeling bold in that vision. But all of that success is built on a core business of games development, and statements like these make me worry the company doesn't realise quite how on the back foot its studios are right now.

Geralt in Bear School gear tossing a coin pouch inn the air


(Image credit: CD Projeckt)

I look at CD Projekt in 2023 and I see a company that's in many ways back at square one, whether it knows it or not. The Witcher needs a whole new cast and perspective; Cyberpunk 2077 needs to redefine what it is and escape the shadow of its own debut; even their core tech is new to them, with a switch over from the Red Engine it's been using since 2011's The Witcher 2 to Unreal Engine that's sure to be a challenge even if the team denies it's starting over from scratch. The company that made The Witcher 3 shouldn't be in the position of having to near-completely rebuild its standing just seven years later, but that's the situation it's in.
I look at that slate of projects, and the thing that I'm most optimistic for is Hadar. A whole new setting, built from the ground up by CD Projekt Red—finally something entirely the studio's own. There's the possibility there for a truly fresh start, free from the baggage of their two current flagships—working with a world designed from day one to complement CDPR's incredible strengths as an RPG developer. It's a really exciting concept. But concept is exactly the stage that project seems to be at still, and given the timeline CDP works on, it could be a decade or more before we get to play it, if it comes to light at all.
I honestly am rooting for CD Projekt, and I'm certainly not foretelling its doom—it's a resilient company that's already endured a lot just to get to this point. It's just hard not to look at the obstacles set before it and see a rather murkier vision of the future than the company itself would like to imagine. After finally climbing the mountain that was rehabilitating Cyberpunk 2077, I'm sure many at CDP are ready for a well-earned break—but I can only see even more hard work to be done ahead.
 

Zeriel

Arcane
Joined
Jun 17, 2012
Messages
13,530
I have to disagree with that dude insofar as seeing "their own content" as being the least likely to succeed. If you look at what made CDPR work, it was them relying on the viability of outside content/settings. Kind of like how Bioware did so much better with 2e Faerun as creative inspiration than they did with Dragon Age. The devs want to believe they are held back by other people's ideas, but time and again we discover, nope, they are actually worse when they don't have something to start with as a basis.

It seems like it should be obvious that people who don't come up with these ideas for a living but execute on other people's ideas are unlikely to be better than the market-tested result of the best creative franchises that already exist simply being mined for new products.

Ultimately this seems to me like the classical hubris and overconfidence that builds up in the gaming industry. They get a few good titles under their belt and think they are geniuses, when they are really just workmanship-like craftsmen, and stepping away from what they were previously good at is what does them in. Sure doesn't help when the people who stay and think they are geniuses are the upper management types, and the craftsmen are the ones driven out or let go from stress.
 

Justicar

Dead game
Glory to Ukraine
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
4,467
Location
Afghanistan
Nice analyst.

Cyberpunk 2077's redemption is complete, but the future remains murky for CD Projekt

By Robin Valentine
published 6 days ago
Despite a wide slate of games in development, it feels like the company's starting over from scratch.
V looking afraid or confused and pointing to herself in Cyberpunk 2077.

(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)

It's official: Cyberpunk 2077's redemption arc is complete. It feels like after three years of flagellation, CD Projekt can finally move on. But I can't help but think the company's future is still murky.
The Witcher 3 was a masterpiece, firmly establishing CDP's original studio, CD Projekt Red, as one of the best RPG development teams of all time. It felt like the beginning of a shining new era for the company—but it was also the end of The Witcher. With Geralt's story finished so completely that we even got to see him retire to a vineyard in the south of France, it was time for something new.
After an eight year wait, we got that, in the form of Cyberpunk 2077—but its launch was such a debacle that the studio had to spend years focused just on fixing both the game and its own tattered reputation. Though 2.0 has successfully turned the game into something closer to players' original expectations, it'll always be remembered as a disaster first and a good RPG second.
That leaves CDP in the unenviable position of having two core brands that are both pretty difficult to build a future for.
With The Witcher, the company is essentially starting over again on hard mode, needing to develop a new cast of characters and hoping they can resonate as strongly as some of the most beloved RPG protagonists ever, drawn from a beloved book series. How strong is people's affection for that world outside of their love of Geralt, Ciri, and pals? CDP's going to have to find out.
The Witcher
(Image credit: CD Projekt Red)
And though Cyberpunk 2077's story has only just begun, any sequel will be arriving under a weighty shadow. Any bugs or flaws will be judged twice as harshly; but any reduction in ambition or scope will be seen as a step backwards. The first game was the victim of one of the most intense hype trains we've ever seen, but its follow-up may have an even more difficult time pleasing its audience.
Faced with those two quandaries, I think I'd be regrouping and taking cautious steps. Instead, CDP has expanded with multiple new studios, and announced a huge slate of projects, all so early in development they only have codenames. Let's run them down:

Project Polaris (The Witcher)​

Developer: CD Projekt Red
A full Witcher sequel from the original studio, described as the start of a new trilogy.

Project Orion (Cyberpunk 2077)​

Developer: CD Projekt Red North America, CD Projekt Red Vancouver
The task of making a sequel to Cyberpunk 2077 falls to the new Boston and Vancouver studios.

Project Sirius (The Witcher)​

Developer: The Molasses Flood
A spin-off project from a small studio CDP gobbled up in 2021, previously known mainly for modest survival game The Flame in the Flood.

Cyberpunk 2077 "live action project"​

Developer: Anonymous Content
Is it a TV show? Is it a film? All we know is it will tell "a brand new story" in Night City, though production company Anonymous Content has a good track record.

Project Canis Majoris (The Witcher)​

Developer: Fool's Theory
A remake of the first Witcher game, developed by an external studio but with "CDP's full creative supervision".

Project Hadar​

Developer: CD Projekt Red
A brand new IP, being built from scratch at CDP's original studio alongside Project Polaris. Concept work began in 2021, but even now it seems like it's still at the world-building stage.
Cyberpunk 2077 character Johnny Silverhand with arms crossed looks away from the camera and smiles

(Image credit: Tyler C. / CD Projekt)
That's a lot of projects for any company to spin-up at once, and almost all of them give reason for healthy scepticism. The Cyberpunk 2077 sequel in the hands of the untested US studios; the original Warsaw studio juggling both a new take on The Witcher and creating an entirely new series; a Witcher spin-off that's already been through development troubles before we've even learned its name; a full remake of the first game in the hands of a largely unknown outside developer that's never attempted anything of that scale before. There are no sure bets here.
"Whenever you consider us, you think of us as game developers. That's true but it's not the full truth," said chief commercial officer Michal Nowakowski at an investor's presentation earlier this month. "We want to be popular culture developers."
I get it, every company wants to be a multimedia empire these days, and with the success of projects like the Edgerunners anime and the Witcher TV series (recent casting drama aside), I can understand why CDP would be feeling bold in that vision. But all of that success is built on a core business of games development, and statements like these make me worry the company doesn't realise quite how on the back foot its studios are right now.
Geralt in Bear School gear tossing a coin pouch inn the air
(Image credit: CD Projeckt)
I look at CD Projekt in 2023 and I see a company that's in many ways back at square one, whether it knows it or not. The Witcher needs a whole new cast and perspective; Cyberpunk 2077 needs to redefine what it is and escape the shadow of its own debut; even their core tech is new to them, with a switch over from the Red Engine it's been using since 2011's The Witcher 2 to Unreal Engine that's sure to be a challenge even if the team denies it's starting over from scratch. The company that made The Witcher 3 shouldn't be in the position of having to near-completely rebuild its standing just seven years later, but that's the situation it's in.
I look at that slate of projects, and the thing that I'm most optimistic for is Hadar. A whole new setting, built from the ground up by CD Projekt Red—finally something entirely the studio's own. There's the possibility there for a truly fresh start, free from the baggage of their two current flagships—working with a world designed from day one to complement CDPR's incredible strengths as an RPG developer. It's a really exciting concept. But concept is exactly the stage that project seems to be at still, and given the timeline CDP works on, it could be a decade or more before we get to play it, if it comes to light at all.
I honestly am rooting for CD Projekt, and I'm certainly not foretelling its doom—it's a resilient company that's already endured a lot just to get to this point. It's just hard not to look at the obstacles set before it and see a rather murkier vision of the future than the company itself would like to imagine. After finally climbing the mountain that was rehabilitating Cyberpunk 2077, I'm sure many at CDP are ready for a well-earned break—but I can only see even more hard work to be done ahead.
Retarted take nigger.
 

Yoomazir

Educated
Joined
Sep 21, 2020
Messages
235
Btw, any news about those people who ragequitted CDPR and went to make their own studio, Rebel Wolves? Last thing I heard was that they were going to make a "AAA" rpg.
 

Maxie

Wholesome Chungus
Patron
Glory to Ukraine
Joined
Nov 13, 2021
Messages
7,013
Location
Warszawa, PL
Btw, any news about those people who ragequitted CDPR and went to make their own studio, Rebel Wolves? Last thing I heard was that they were going to make a "AAA" rpg.
all people who ragequit cdpr and go on to make their own studio tend to flock around discount bin shooters
 

lukaszek

the determinator
Patron
Joined
Jan 15, 2015
Messages
12,765
Btw, any news about those people who ragequitted CDPR and went to make their own studio, Rebel Wolves? Last thing I heard was that they were going to make a "AAA" rpg.
all people who ragequit cdpr and go on to make their own studio tend to flock around discount bin shooters
'ex-witcher dev' is new 'inspired by planescape/bg'
 

KeAShizuku

Novice
Joined
Dec 11, 2023
Messages
83
dunno what they said but stock took a dive
IT stock is mostly about increased revenue forecasts and hype. For example, I closely follow Adobe stock and it's up 58% this year solely because of Firefly which atm barely makes a dent in Adobe's income.
Read: it's a casino.
Depends. Day trading is definitely a casino. But its proven that if you put money in an index fund for 30 years you'll make money.
 

Infinitron

I post news
Staff Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
97,729
Codex Year of the Donut Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire Pathfinder: Kingmaker Pathfinder: Wrath I'm very into cock and ball torture I helped put crap in Monomyth
https://press.cdprojektred.com/en/n...s-in-strength-at-cd-projekt-red-north-america

Cyberpunk 2077 Follow-up, codenamed Project Orion, grows in strength at CD PROJEKT RED North America​

CD PROJEKT RED has announced several high-profile additions to the team working on Project Orion — the anticipated follow-up to Cyberpunk 2077 being headed up by the US and Canada-based CD PROJEKT RED North America.

Project Orion is currently in the early stages of development, with studio veterans previously involved in Cyberpunk 2077 and its spy-thriller Phantom Liberty expansion spearheading the project, including Gabriel Amatangelo (Game Director), Paweł Sasko (Associate Game Director), Igor Sarzyński (Creative Director), Andrzej Stopa (Cinematic Director), Kacper Niepokólczycki (Environment Art Director), Sarah Grümmer (Acting Lead Quest Designer) and Kacper Kościeński (Engineering Director). This group is now part of a larger team based in the newly created CDPR studio in Boston, Massachusetts.

Joining them at this location are industry professionals with years of experience and a variety of well-known and impressive AAA projects:
  • Dan Hernberg is joining the team as Executive Producer. Dan has previously worked as Head of Production at Amazon Games, Head of Production and Product Management at Panic Button, and Lead Product Manager at Blizzard Entertainment — and contributed to such titles as New World, Apex Legends, and Diablo III, among others.
  • Ryan Barnard’s past credits include Game Director at Massive Entertainment and Ubisoft, as well as Gameplay Director at Hitman developer IO Interactive. He will be contributing his skillset as Design Director.
  • Alan Villani is entering the Project Orion team as Engineering Director, having previously lent his technical expertise as VP of Technology on various WB Game products, including technical direction on several Mortal Kombat titles.
  • Anna Megill is an award-winning game writer and author with 20 years’ experience in video games. She joins Project Orion as Lead Writer on the heels of narrative contributions to such titles as Control (Remedy), Dishonored: Death of The Outsider (Arkane), Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora (Ubisoft Massive), Guild Wars 2 (ArenaNet), and the upcoming Fable (Playground Games).
  • Alexander Freed will further bolster the writing for Project Orion. The New York Times bestselling novelist, narrative designer, and comic book writer with over 15 years of game writing experience has previously worked as Lead Writer at BioWare on, among other titles, Star Wars: The Old Republic. He has also written and consulted for various major studios, including DICE, Obsidian Entertainment, Wizards of the Coast, and 20th Century Fox's games division FoxNext.
As work on the follow-up to Cyberpunk 2077, codename Project Orion, enters early stages of development at CD PROJEKT RED North America, the company is currently hiring for various positions across its Boston and Vancouver locations.The full list of job openings is available on the official CD PROJEKT RED website and will be further updated once new openings become available.
 

Justicar

Dead game
Glory to Ukraine
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
4,467
Location
Afghanistan
New lead writer, Anna Megill, is the one behind this cutie:


fable-4-graphics-real-playground-games-550x309.jpg


Can't wait for They Witcher 4.
Rip cyberpunk 2 then she was hired for that Polish writer Marcin Blacha (18 years at Cdpr) is working on witcher 4.

Seems they want murican studio to work on cyberpunk franchise while Polish side will work on the witcher.
 

Moink

Cipher
Joined
Feb 28, 2015
Messages
672
Doing a quick google and it looks like Alexander Freed wrote the Imperial Agent storyline in SWTOR, which is generally considered the best questline in the game.
 

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