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Serious Sam 4

Discussion in 'General Gaming' started by Belegarsson, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. Unreal Savant

    Unreal
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    Let's take a look at your original post:
    So the game used some environments they had created for a different game, but oh wait, the alpha had different levels that played different that AREN'T the same as the Quake-clone-copied levels in the final game, but actually the final game is just an evolution of that Quake-clone, because game development is gradual and basically you are just talking random shit without actually thinking about it. Oh yeah, and the game has no level design, which is completely uncharacteristic of any kind of Quake-clone. Hm.

    The only way what you're saying could actually be valid is if they did what I said. They clearly didn't, as that would be stupid, which means that the gradual evolution that you mention is the only other possibility. Even though you say that, it contradicts your argument, which is saying that there is some sort of gap separating the gameplay and the level design. But how do you suppose that could even be? What did they do to achieve that? Did one aspect of the game evolve faster than the other (which would only be possible if it were done so in isolation)? Did they perhaps indeed ‘flip a switch’, but only for the gameplay? The answer is that there is no such gap, because the combat and level design are one and the same, and the game that's in the game is what the game actually is. The version of Serious Sam that exists IS Serious Sam, but you seem to have this ideal version of in your head that has no vestiges of its supposed past as a Quake-clone. In fact, everything you've been saying comes from the vague impressions in your mind that have little to do with how the games actually are.

    What is actually known about the game is this: They were creating a game inspired by Doom called ‘In the Flesh’, but eventually decided to change the setting to Egypt and renamed it to Serious Sam. Supposedly, they confirmed that some models and enemies originated from that previous version of the game, but there's nothing said about the level design. Even if some of it could be retained, it's extremely doubtful that much, if any of it, actually made it to the final release, especially considering that not even most of the alpha's maps made it intact, either. None of it matters, anyway, as all of these versions of the game are, well, literally the same game. Whatever is in the final game is what the game is. And really, the alpha is not so massively different as you seem to think it is. It's just a worse version of the game with lots of unfinished stuff. It may have more corridors and other strange things that got cut, but it's still full of large areas typical of Serious Sam and no other game. What kind of Quake are you playing that's in any way like that?
     
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  2. Israfael Arcane

    Israfael
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    How fun is that this game as well as Doom Eternal outed shillman and civvie (and their followers) as people who can't aim for shit and have zero experience in multiplayer arena shooters
     
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  3. Bad Sector Arbiter Patron

    Bad Sector
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    Right, i see you are more interested in memes than actual discussion. Sorry for wasting your time.

    Is it really that hard to understand what i wrote? Here, let me try and summarize it:
    • They started by making a Quake clone
      • They made environments for that game
    • Then over time they went towards the egypt style
      • However they didn't recreate the environments from scratch, instead they converted their existing environments to the new style
    • The alpha version has environments that are largely similar to those of the final game but were also based on those from the early Quake clone time
    • The final version has environments which are stitched versions of those in the alpha version
    • And so my original point: the environments in the final Serious Sam were originally made for another game, they weren't made from scratch specifically for Serious Sam
    FWIW if you play the alpha version you'll see that pretty much all enemy models have been replaced between the alpha and the final version of the game.

    There have been some comparisons from old material, check this video as an example.

    But even without that, Croteam is a small studio, it doesn't make sense for them to throw everything away - which is also exactly what they've been doing all these years with them reusing as much of their previous work as they can (TSE contains levels from SS alpha, SS3 contains monsters made for their failed Doom 4 proposal and their cancelled modern military shooter, SS4 contains assets from Talos, etc).
     
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  4. Unreal Savant

    Unreal
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    Yeah, I bet they totally just totally took some random horror themed levels and turned them into Egypt, somehow. Hey retard, all the visuals would have to be completely remade to fit the new aesthetic, so most of the geometry would be replaced, leaving... what, some completely open spaces? Some generic corridors? I can see how you could convert some things, but when most of the geometry is just background detail entirely specific to the setting, there's little that could be retained. And all that could be is just something you could remake in five seconds anyway. Again, you're acting like they're incapable of making new things for some reason.

    ‘They copied the maps from a different game, actually it wasn't a separate game, it was the same game that evolved, by the way it was a separate game.’

    That's what you've been saying. Liek, Baldurps Gayte is just a bunch of maps from some RTS turned into an RPG, Quake is just a bunch of random environments stitched together, derp derp derp. If it's not true of those games, why would it be true here?

    Not the point, retard. The character designs/concepts were the same, and perhaps the actual models in the alpha were so too. But I don't know, I didn't see it myself (and neither did you), that's just what Croteam supposedly said. Actually, why is it that, according to you, the levels are just some Quake-clone shit, despite that being very unlikely for every reason possible, and yet when they themselves say certain designs came from said Quake-clone, you just go ‘omg the models are different bro herp derp i have autism, you didn't specifically say it exactly right so i win haha i shit my pants’?

    Wow, an ancient screenshot of Serious Sam before they official renamed it to Serious Sam. Clearly evidence of level reuse from an entirely different game (which is still the same game!) and not just some extremely basic structures that could go anywhere. The level in that example isn't even in the final game, lol. Show me an actual screenshot of In the Flesh with its original setting and maybe I'll believe you.

    You can reuse things when they fit your current design without much extra work. If you can, why not? But all you've been doing is assuming shit you actually don't know a single thing about. Perhaps they kept certain environments, to whatever extent that is even possible, but how can you tell? Why does that even bother you? You've still completely and utterly failed to understand my point: Whatever design they settled on is what the game is, and it's pointless to complain about it retaining some aspects of earlier concepts unless you actually have some contradictory expectations of it. In that I could understand it if it were about a sequel, but the original game? That's the very definition of what Serious Sam is. If TFE contains concepts from their ‘Quake-clone’... then that's just part of the game. It's not a foreign element. It's literally just what it is.
     
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  5. Bad Sector Arbiter Patron

    Bad Sector
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    "Somehow" being that they replaced the textures, it isn't like Serious Sam actually *looks* like Egypt, at most it has a pyramid here and there but largely when it comes to the geometry it is just....

    ...open spaces connected with generic corridors, with some columns here and there. The rest is texturework.

    No, i'm not, my point in the entire discussion is that their levels were based on existing levels they had, not that they copy/pasted their levels exactly as they were.

    If you do a bad faith reading of what i'm writing (which is what you seem to be doing so far), i can see how you might read what i write like that. However if you actually try to understand what i'm writing i hope you'll realize that when i wrote "different game" i meant the original game they started with which was, indeed, a different game they wanted to make. That they ended up transitioning to Serious Sam doesn't mean that the game they started with was Serious Sam, in the beginning their game was meant to be some dark horror game with environmental puzzles (they even mention portal puzzles in their home page, but in the alpha you can also see gravity-based puzzles in leftover levels that were removed in the final game).

    You can find it online, search for ss_alpha_cleaned.zip.

    The final levels are certainly not "Quake-clone shit" (which i never wrote), they are based on the alpha levels, themselves being based on the levels from their original Quake clone.

    And that was exactly my point! But to make it more clear and to answer your next question...

    ...i never wrote that anything of that bothers me, this is your bad faith reading of the messages i wrote so far.

    The entire discussion began with me writing that schru was overoptimistic about the effort Croteam put in their level design and as a reason for why, i wrote that their final game uses environments from their Quake clone (and again to be clear, i did not write that their levels are the same as those in their Quake clone - that would be an extrapolation of what i wrote that i did not imply nor would agree with). This was to show that their level designs are generic enough (ie. "basic structures that could go anywhere") to translate from their earlier work to the final game. Obviously there were changes made to it, it isn't like they copy/pasted the environments from one map to another.

    Next time try to not take things out of context and end up with misunderstanding what others are writing, it is a waste of time for everyone involved.
     
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  6. Tehdagah Arcane

    Tehdagah
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    Croteam did nothing wrong
     
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  7. Unreal Savant

    Unreal
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    If you have to go through all the effort of retexturing, why not just make entirely new levels? No matter what you think, one can't just slap some textures on a hell dungeon and be done with it. It HAS to be remodelled. At that point, there's no harm in just making entirely new maps. The amount of extra work that would add is trivial compared to the amount it'd already take to adapt existing levels.

    Kind of like every game ever made. A truly profound statement.

    You don't know that.

    I meant neither of us has seen the game that existed before Serious Sam, so it's not possible to tell how much of it was actually retained into the alpha and the final game. I've fully played both. I don't need a download.

    So it's just back to you making pointless statements that aren't even necessarily true.

    The screenshot isn't evidence that they retextured anything from their previous concepts. It's just apparently an extremely basic version of what is a map that was ultimately cut. What is that supposed to prove? You have nothing to but assumptions. You can't argue against that unless you actually show something substantial instead of repeating yourself. If you think the level design is weak, you don't need to come up with some weird made-up reason for it. Even if it is true, it doesn't matter. So what if they perhaps reused things? What does that have to do with whether the final product is good? It doesn't.

    :hmmm:
     
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  8. Bad Sector Arbiter Patron

    Bad Sector
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    Different people make the texture assets and the levels and it can be easier to adjust existing textures or even replace them with matching new ones than make the new levels, especially when to do the latter you need to be using an unfinished level editor. Also their levels were made using brushes which align textures mostly automatically, you do not need to remodel a level with brushes to replace the textures.

    You write all the time that i do not know and make assumptions, but here you are making assumptions about the triviality of adapting existing levels vs making new levels from scratch.

    I have seen the pre-alpha screenshots, the alpha levels and the final levels as well as their high reuse of assets in later games so i can make an educated guess. After all when you see smoke behind the mountain you do not assume that it is just an unusually high number of strong smokers having a party and wait until you see flames.

    However note that i never wrote anything about how much of In The Flesh version was retained into the alpha version, this is your own assumption and you largely brought the discussion about In The Flesh while i was mainly writing about the alpha version, exactly because -as you write- i do not know much about In The Flesh itself. My reference to the latter was when i wrote that the final game used environments originally created (though obviously altered, see below about the "screenshot") for it.

    First of all i have a feeling you are looking at something different. Check again the timestamp part of the video i linked at, it doesn't show a single screenshot, it overlaps an older screenshot with a newer screenshot which shows how the newer map was evolved from the older map. And that is exactly what is "supposed to prove": that they based their maps based on their earlier maps instead of making them from scratch. Which is also what i am writing repeatedly since the first message you replied to.

    I am only repeating myself because you ignore what i wrote, but yeah you are right, it is pointless to repeat myself.

    I'm not coming up with anything, what i wrote is that they used environments in their final game from an earlier game - which is a fact that can be seen both in the video i posted above and by playing the alpha.

    This is funny because when i wrote "Next time try to not take things out of context and end up with misunderstanding what others are writing" your reply was...

    ...but what else can i think when you write that?

    Not only you took what i wrote out of context and misunderstood what i wrote but you also refuse to even acknowledge it, willfully retaining your misunderstanding.

    I do not mind mind having arguments but i do mind having my time wasted by arguing with someone who doesn't even bother to read what i write, take into account the context of what i wrote and after i explicitly point that out they keep doing what they are doing. This isn't just a waste of time, it is also tiring because i have to point out both the issues with what you write and try to reply to them.

    So let me make this clear. Quoting again, each part:

    It does matter in the context of the discussion to show that their level designs were not made from scratch for the final game of Serious Sam specifically. Why does that matter? Because... well, you know what? Read the part you actually quoted but didn't bothered to read and understand. It is right there.

    Nothing. I have zero issue with developers reusing things, i'd reuse things if i could too. That doesn't mean that the reuse doesn't have implications though. For details, see above.

    No it doesn't, i agree with this and i never claimed otherwise. None of my comments had anything to do with the final product being good or not. In fact i like the Serious Sam series, they're not among my favorite FPS games because i am not a big fan of the arena style of games (like the games i mentioned in a previous post) but i still have fun with them (and the games i mentioned in said previous post).

    But look, if you are going to reply with something that is again based on ignoring what i wrote then i'm not going to bother replying. Repeating myself isn't interesting at all and honestly i do not think there is much left to write on this topic i haven't already written.
     
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  9. Unreal Savant

    Unreal
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    You'd still have to use the unfinished level editor for retexturing anyway.

    I know how level editors work, I can make those kinds of assumptions. I don't know about unknown versions of games, so of that I can't assume. Obviously.

    More like you can't actually see any smoke, it's just a mountain. But since you say there's smoke, it must be true. Right...

    Asset reuse in future games retroactively proves such in older games, interesting logic you have there.

    So anyway, what you're saying is that... the Quake-clone in question was actually the Serious Sam alpha all along? That'd make sense given the things you've been saying, but that's beyond retarded. Yes, those environments made it into the final game, yes, they were retextured (with better textures of the same theme)... but that's not reusing levels from a different game. That's literally the same maps in the same game. Not only is that obvious, but that's... only the most idiotic would bother to make such statements. And when I start arguing with retards, I usually start by assuming that they have common sense (but of course they don't). Why would you be referring to the alpha in such a way? Of course I'm going to assume you mean In the Flesh, what else could you be referring to? What even makes the alpha seem like a Quake-clone? ‘um well they wuz keyz and shiet’ Cool story bro, the coolest one I've ever heard, in fact.

    Again, that's not basing something on an earlier map, it's the same map (or at least it seems to be, as that's not the only time such structures appear, hence my ‘apparently’). Making those early maps and reiterating on them IS the process of making something, ‘from scratch’ or otherwise. You keep repeating it and I keep ignoring it because it's too retarded to even recognize as a point someone would try to emphasize. Do you really think I'd assume they make things with instant perfection on the first try?

    I am only repeating myself because you ignore what i wrote, but yeah you are right, it is pointless to repeat myself.

    Bad Sector never grew up, he was just replaced with separate versions of himself that reused parts of previous Bad Sectors (who are to be viewed as distinct entities). The only difference is his skin, which is why he is a nigger.

    :hmmm::hmmm::hmmm::hmmm::hmmm:

    In the end, you admit that your comments are pointless and only have a meaning when viewed in the particularly autistic way that you see them. Well, thanks for participating, retard. Aaaaaaah yourself.
     
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  10. 2020—when even something as simple and mediocre as Serious Sam is too much to ask of developers.
     
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  11. Zlaja Arcane

    Zlaja
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    I've heard some bad things about the game but then you see footage like this (watch from 3:11:00 to 3:14:00) and go "hmmm.."




    :bravo:
     
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  12. JDR13 Prophet

    JDR13
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    Twas not but a mild skirmish.
     
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  13. Zlaja Arcane

    Zlaja
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    Mixed well with the music. And the music itself reminded me of Dynasty Warriors. :incline:
     
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  14. Tehdagah Arcane

    Tehdagah
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    The final area of the game looks like art
     
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  15. Verylittlefishes Sacro Bosco Patron

    Verylittlefishes
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    Didn't read the thread, is it THAT bad?
     
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  16. udm Arcane Patron

    udm
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    No, game's really good. I cannot understand the "lawl it's too slow" complaints because right after the second major encounter of the first level, the pace picks up immediately. It's not like TFE and TSE also threw you into the heat of things immediately. There are weak spots for sure like the Popemobile segment in Rome, but it's still good old Serious Sam. The only thing I really miss so far are the indoor levels (the first few indoor levels in TFE with their play on lighting were really cool).

    I am hesitant to post more until I finish the game (at Chapter 8 currently on Serious difficulty), but my thoughts so far are best summed up by this review:
    [​IMG]
     
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  17. schru Cipher

    schru
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    All the particular points aside, keep in mind that I've taken back my original comment where I said that SS2 is ‘very casual’ and modified it to ‘relatively casual compared to the other instalments’. It is still a Serious Sam game, but the console influence is apparent.

    Personal preferences are fine, of course, but there's also the objective side of one version of the enemy requiring a bit more complicated response from the player and the other variant being simplified, in line with the over-all flow of combat in SS2. This fits into the general tendency of simplifying things for more casual players or ease of play with a controller.

    About the ambushes around pick-ups, I mentioned it just to express my appreciation for them. It's nothing more, of course.

    I'm fine with including them together in a broad subcategory of arena shooters, but I will insist that they're quite dissimilar in how they play. Shadow Warrior (2013) and Doom (2016) (perhaps the new Wolfensteins too, to some degree) actually seem like a development from Painkiller's formula, but they're related to Serious Sam only in the most superficial sense of possessing arenas. Serious Sam isn't even that strictly bound by the arenas, it's simply what some of its major playing areas are (and in that they're more elaborate than what the other games have), while a game like Painkiller or the new Shadow Warrior takes much more care to lock the player down in a small section while supplying a steady flow of enemies. You move forward in Serious Sam much more briskly and the obstacle to proceeding more often comes from the sheer danger of the enemies coming at you (which isn't it say that SS doesn't have a decent number of arenas that remain closed until you kill everything).

    I know, I just thought it even less relevant to liken Serious Sam to that game. Sure, but that's only if we simplify them to the point of blurring away the contents and arrangements of the levels that affect the gameplay on top of the basic way in which the space is enclosed.

    So the final levels, despite being evolutions of the ‘Quake clone’, play unlike a Quake clone, but because the ‘Quake clone’ label can be attached to them in some way, it must mean that SS's maps were not actually intended for its gameplay concept, but were instead extrinsically affixed to it?

    Either the maps in the final version of the Encounters are substantially different from the alpha version or the alpha maps were thoroughly redesigned with SS's gameplay concept in mind, and in either case Serious Sam has its own specific kind of level design. It's natural that certain map designs can be adapted and reworked, sometimes they contain possibilities for different kind of mechanics that can be drawn out from them.

    This may be true, but it doesn't actually disprove that they ‘stumbled’ on a cohesive formula while developing The First Encounter and were inspired by it in turn to refine it for the final releases.

    The reason Croteam (somewhat) missed the point of SS1 in SS2 was that they developed it for the Xbox with all the considerations attaching to it. SS3 was much closer to the original despite some misfired additions; it even ramped up the difficulty nicely. The realistic dressing of the maps limited the game to some degree perhaps, but they still made it abstract and fitted to the needs of the gameplay where it mattered.

    I brought up the level design originally because you said that the SS games are repetitive and lumped them together with the other arena shooters. The way the levels (and enemy placement as well as horde composition) work in SS is substantially different from the other arena games which, while having their own peculiarities, rely much more on generic AI behaviour that isn't affected much by set piece design or the particular area you're fighting in.

    +

    SS2's smaller map size is totally unrelated to the fact that the earlier SS port to Xbox couldn't handle the map size in TFE from 2001? Those problems would indeed be ‘magically’ fixed on PCs because their technology was five years ahead of that of the Xbox, with standards also being considerably higher on PCs, as popular games like Battlefield 2 required 2 GB of RAM for good performance on higher settings; also, the Xbox had a GeForce 3 series card, while the 7 series was already available for PCs.

    The more elaborate style could have easily been supported by the more powerful hardware, while not leaving out players with weaker PCs as Croteam's Serious Engine 1 and 3 are very scalable, having a broad array of performance settings. If SS2 had a special rendering method that created intrinsic obstacles to having large maps, it was because that method was required for it to work on the Xbox.

    It's also worth noting that major games from 2005 that were released on the PC and the next generation of consoles (Xbox 360, PS3) used very different lighting and shader technology, relatively sophisticated for the time, while SS2 has that ‘matt’ and diffused look (which I personally don't mind and in certain cases even like) that the Xbox and PS2-era games had. What other moderately popular games came out for the PC and the original Xbox (but not 360) that year? Psychonauts, Brothers in Arms, Project Snowblind, among others. They all happen to have that ‘matt’ look that doesn't make use of the newer shader technologies. What a coincidence.

    Well, this is an aside, I just mentioned I also find it questionable how that map pack (AC) is seemingly regarded as a good development of Quake's formula.

    This is mostly repeating the above, but regarding this more specifically, a game released four and a half years later could have easily had more detail while keeping the map size as the computing resources had proportionally increased in all areas.

    They would have had it if they had designed the game for the PC. The large numbers of enemies certainly strained the available resources and limited how much of them could be dedicated to the visual side, but there would have still been room for relative improvement.

    Ha ha, it actually describes all shooters that don't have free roaming in open maps. But that's a bit too general.

    I understand that, but I was also speaking about auto-aim in nineties shooters and how its being a default feature had potentially made some of those games more adaptable to consoles. I was also responding to this part: ‘The auto-aim in 3D PC shooters like Quake, etc is very minimal (it was the "2.5D" games like Doom that had more auto-aim but even that was only vertical)’.

    Well, in a way that's true because first-person shooters are inherently a PC genre. Shooters, in their fast-paced, interactive, free-movement form, came into existence on the PC, within its specific ‘environment’. Shooters on consoles were a simplified and diminutive adaptation of this PC-specific genre and in certain ways it holds true to this day.

    How about System Shock for consoles, Deus Ex for consoles (well, this happened), or Operation Flashpoint? Simpler shooters like Half-Life, Unreal, Counter-Strike, Blood, Quake, or Quake III can feasibly be transposed to consoles but not with all the player agility and level of action they allow for. It's evident in how the more extreme feats possible in those games, like snap precision aiming or fast movement with rocket-jumping, hopping, and taking advantage of cumulative momentum, have no place on consoles. This isn't to say that PC shooters are about these things, but it puts into sharp relief how much further their limits go.

    What makes a ‘PC shooter’ isn't the difficulty specifically which naturally is something variable and game-dependent. The variation in difficulty between various PC games has to do with how their gameplay systems differ or what kind of challenge developers were aiming at on an individual basis. When a game or a set type of game is ported to consoles, in the first place its controls are adjusted for a single standard which is comparatively cumbersome, then there is a more generally-applicable (or rather, in effect, generally-applied) set of expectations of what kind of demographic it should cater to.

    The gamepad support in certain games was an optional, accessory thing and Id Software always recommended trying to play with mouse and keyboard in the manuals. The ‘2.5-D’ games also do not present the same challenges when playing them with a controller.

    It is though. I don't have a bias against Serious Sam II as I in fact like the game and generally don't have a problem with setting aside problems that a shift to a console focus bring, so long as the game is enjoyable on its own merits (I enjoyed Deus Ex: Invisible War). I just point out how SS2 fits into the well-established at the time pattern of compromising once-PC-centric titles for the growing console market. You ‘explained’ things in a contrived manner, ignoring obvious qualitative differences between the games and typical signs of console design.

    They don't need to be played with a controller if their design is PC-centric, in such a case controller support should be an option that doesn't affect anything for those who don't use it, such as the interface or key mappings that combine several actions in one key in a manner typical of consoles. It's fine for console games to retain that when ported to the PC, though the interface issues (sluggish, less responsive cursor, menus and other screens that consist of many pages displaying few things at a time, requiring to be cycled through) are still pretty annoying.

    High-profile games made to be released on the PC and consoles at the same time are not merely made to be playable on consoles, their design is largely affected by requirements of the console market (here I mean both console hardware, controllers, and marketing decisions vis-à-vis that demographic) and those now prevalent console adjustments, stylistic trends, and compromises have been imposed on the PC platform as a general standard, which wouldn't have been the case if consoles hadn't come to carry so much weight. It's reasonable to say that multi-platform considerations have ‘consolized’ (and this includes much of the whole cinematic trend) genres which started out on the PC as part of what this web site terms ‘decline’.

    I'm sure they are playable with a controller. You say they (PC-exclusive games and multi-platform games) are not that different, yet shooters made for the PC first used to be very different, faster, and involved manœuvring that would be awkward with a controller, etc. Shooters designed for the PS1, N64, the Xbox, and PS2 were a lot more static, slower, and ‘homogeneous’ in their gameplay, while the Xbox 360 and PS3 generation brought about the whole aberration of tediously-scripted cinematic shooters that substituted flashiness for involving action (that is, activity on player's part), while also standardized those typical mechanics and features such as regenerating health, screen turning red when hurt, very limited sprint, cover-based shooting, small number of carried weapons (this can have other reasons and be justified, but that's a different thing), etc.

    This doesn't apply to every single game released since this trend started, and when it does, it does so in varying degrees, but it is a discernible trend.

    Indeed, it wasn't just its cover system, it still had to be an appealing game in other respects, but it was the cover system that made its gameplay work so well on consoles and that is why it became a standard.

    I didn't say that the cover system is a necessity for console shooters. I brought it up to indicate how FPSes modelled more closely on PC standards weren't doing so well on consoles, but then came to cover system which took root on those platforms much better and became almost the standard form for console action games (there were first-person shooters which incorporated it too). It happened because consoles as a platform are different from the PC and different forms of gameplay handle better on them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
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  18. Verylittlefishes Sacro Bosco Patron

    Verylittlefishes
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    Pretty sure its baby duck syndrome, but still...I've felt deep emotional connection, a sense of adventure when playing SS:SE fucking 18 years ago. Tried SS2 but was turned away by overall tasteless circus (yes, I know we are talking about Serious Sam series), tried SS3 and was turned away by this weird change of style into Spec Ops realism. Still think that Second Encounter is a tremendous game.

    Should I even try this one? I like Jonas Kyratzes' writing, but this is Serious Sam, not Torment.
     
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  19. Anthedon Arcane Patron

    Anthedon
    Joined:
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    Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    :what:
     
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  20. Unkillable Cat Prestigious Gentleman LEST WE FORGET Patron

    Unkillable Cat
    Joined:
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    Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
    LOL, there's five tons of minigun ammo lying around, and then he uses every other gun in his arsenal before finally catching on.
     
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  21. Unkillable Cat Prestigious Gentleman LEST WE FORGET Patron

    Unkillable Cat
    Joined:
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    Codex 2014 Make the Codex Great Again! Grab the Codex by the pussy
    If it's been a while since you played Second Encounter, you might wanna check out some mods.

    My "go-to"-mod for SE has been Serious Violence 3.0... however the version I'm seeing available for download doesn't match with mine.

    Anyway, if the mod contains the black walkers (as shown early in this video) then you've got the right mod.

     
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  22. Interesting points there.
    Really.
     
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  23. Israfael Arcane

    Israfael
    Joined:
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    Finished the game on Serious a week ago or so, I'd say I liked it but it's very uneven. What is interesting the last level was a breeze (as compared to the canyon in SS3 (an endurance test, really, I've spent probably 2 hours to do that in clean time, not counting reloads and so on) or the pyramid in SS1. Still, I died many times, but it was not frustrating or hopeless, just one or two bad autosaves when I was too carried away with laser spamming), but the mid-game was brutal. I'd say it'd be the hardest SS game (apart from canyon in ss3), but the gadgets even out the odds and basically give you an option to skip hard fights of your choice.


    I'd say black hole would have to be toned down (as it's basically 20 seconds long serious bomb), time warp should be buffed somewhat (it's mostly useless apart from fights with lots of firecracker guys and reptiloids). Some weapons (laser gun with addon mode) feel way too overpowered, I basically mowed down an entire battlefield with one press of a right mouse button (even without popping the serious damage) , others, like the normal shotgun, should probably be buffed (more damage from grenades, maybe?). Also, reload perk is also much more useful than most of the other "skills", it doubles the damage for some guns and makes assault rifle better than the minigun (which may be actually good as it brings some variety).

    PS for all people who experience low fps / micro-stuttering and so on - try to disable streaming system in the serioussam4.ini, it really helps a lot.
     
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  24. Gerrard Arcane

    Gerrard
    Joined:
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    Why does it all look so cheap? Those bullet trails, the trees just disappearing when blown up, the way the explosions just seem to pop-in as well...
    :negative:
     
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  25. DalekFlay Arcane Patron

    DalekFlay
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    Why does a fucking Serious Sam game of all things inspire such lengthy diatribes.
     
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